New Job and Done with Rideshare FOREVER

IGotDrive

Active Member
After months of looking, I finally got a new job that's pretty good. At the point right before I got the job, I was looking at the Taco Bell now hiring signs and wondering which ones I should apply to.

I actually did my last ridedhares in November and moved on to the delivery gigs. In that month, I got into an accident on my way to a pick up (didn't have to report it as a commercial trip, thank goodness). I had already signed up for a couple of the delivery apps and realized I could use the rental my insurance company gave me to do deliveries, which was a bit of a savior. But DoorDash (specifically) was actually a waste of time and gas because that's pretty much all you were making enough money for - your gas to do the job.

Before then, I had been working CRAZY hours doing rideshares in one of the busiest places in the country, used all of the tricks (no pickups over 2-3 miles, drove in areas where people tipped most (I actually was fortunate to get tips every 2 to 3 rides on some days, which I believe has a lot to do with my outgoing personality), didn't wait more than 5 minutes for pick ups, avoided Targets/malls/etc. and trips into zones where I couldn't make pick ups, etc. etc. etc. - you name it, I did it, and read this and another site (but especially this one) religiously for pointers on how to make the most money. Additionally, there are always pings where I worked, whether it's at 4am on a Tuesday morning or during the weekends, so there was no shortage of rides depending on how far you were willing to go for a pick up. I even slept in my vehicle some weekends, getting 6 hours of sleep at a time when sometimes both apps (Uber/Lyft) would kick me off for going over the 12-hour limit (which was really about 13-14 hour limits). I easily did 80-100 hour weeks so I couldn't understand how, like @FormerTaxiDriver♧ , I was slowly going into deep debt. Well, I could understand how, but I couldn't understand how it was legal. That $250 for those long days were actually less than $75 after expenses.

I wrote on message boards, Glassdoor, and Indeed, among all of the fraudulent reviews, to warn others and I even wrote to government officials including the governor about it to let them know what's going on, and I was disgusted that a governor I voted for who actually said in his campaign that he would address rideshare worker issues, instead, spent a considerable amount of time having emergency meetings about the "L" train (which they ended up doing nothing about) and actually has been all about congestion pricing that would actually hurt drivers - it is clear he (Cuomo) has sights on future offices, and my family, some of my gig worker friends and their families, and I have already vowed that we will never vote for him again.

I had done IC work before in other industries, so I couldn't believe that this type of scam work even existed LEGALLY in the US. As an American, I find it highly hypocritical that the US has chastised labor practices in other countries, like sweatshops, when it exists in broad daylight in modern day in this country through rideshare and some other gig companies.

People say they're grateful for these gig companies and that they were helpful to them in their times of need - I truly do respect others opinions and perceptions, but I am not grateful to them at all. I am actually pissed about their unethical practices and the false representations they have given about the money that is made doing this kind of work, and I feel that if I had been honestly informed, I would've gone straight to Taco Bell (or similar) in the first place and wouldn't have lost all of those hours, taken on all of that risk (including with my health), beat up my vehicle, and had the type of debt I have now. Thankfully, I realized all of this before the point where I had to go bankrupt or worse, before I became homeless like I've heard about some other rideshare drivers, but I sure did get those food stamps and emergency funds to pay my rent that I was eligible for while driving for Uber and Lyft. I never would have believed that I would be in that predicament legally working the equivalent of two to three weeks each week.

I still have my license in another industry that is now picking up again, so I will be doing that part-time in addition to my new job until I pay off my debts. I will never use Uber or Lyft as a patron unless it is for an emergency where I have no choice, and for that instance, if it ever occurs, I collect their free ride coupons (so they wouldn't be profitable) and would be sure to tip my driver well and oversee any reasonable imperfections in their service because I have first hand knowledge of what they're likely making and the risks they're taking for the service they're providing; however, although I don't want to hurt rideshare drivers, I'm more likely to take a cab in that situation because it's hard for me to stomach patronizing those companies.

I'm going to take the opportunity and time I now have with this new job to take whatever classes and get whatever licenses/certifications I can get in industries that are steadily in need and provide decent pay so that I will never be in a position to have to do anything like Uber, Lyft, or DoorDash again.

After the exploitation by these companies, the next worst thing were some of the passengers and restaurant workers I encountered (not the majority of them, but way too many of them). Since I am aware of how this affected my view of people, I will try not to let it affect the way I treat people but I can't un-see what I've already seen. I definitely hope it doesn't affect the way I supervise people in my new role, and I hope for their sakes, they don't unreasonably bad-mouth rideshare drivers in front of me - yes, that wouldn't be fair, but as I've heard time and time again on this site, especially from passengers, that life's not fair sometimes. I won't say which industry I now work in and if I ever get to supervise one or some of those passengers and figure out who they are, it would be poetic justice. And no, I did not put the gigs on my resume - do you seriously think I would've gotten the job if I did?
 
Last edited:

TheDevilisaParttimer

Well-Known Member
After months of looking, I finally got a new job that's pretty good. At the point right before I got the job, I was looking at the Taco Bell now hiring signs and wondering which ones I should apply to.

I actually did my last ridedhares in November and moved on to the delivery gigs. In that month, I got into an accident on my way to a pick up (didn't have to report it as a commercial trip, thank goodness). I had already signed up for a couple of the delivery apps and realized I could use the rental my insurance company gave me to do deliveries, which was a bit of a savior. But DoorDash (specifically) was actually a waste of time and gas because that's pretty much all you were making enough money for - your gas to do the job.

Before then, I had been working CRAZY hours doing rideshares in one of the busiest places in the country, used all of the tricks (no pickups over 2-3 miles, drove in areas where people tipped most (I actually was fortunate to get tips every 2 to 3 rides on some days, which I believe has a lot to do with my outgoing personality), didn't wait more than 5 minutes for pick ups, avoided Targets/malls/etc. and trips into zones where I couldn't make pick ups, etc. etc. etc. - you name it, I did it, and read this and another site (but especially this one) religiously for pointers on how to make the most money. Additionally, there are always pings where I worked, whether it's at 4am on a Tuesday morning or during the weekends, so there was no shortage of rides depending on how far you were willing to go for a pick up. I even slept in my vehicle some weekends, getting 6 hours of sleep at a time when sometimes both apps (Uber/Lyft) would kick me off for going over the 12-hour limit (which was really about 13-14 hour limits). I easily did 80-100 hour weeks so I couldn't understand how, like @FormerTaxiDriver♧ , I was slowly going into deep debt. Well, I could understand how, but I couldn't understand how it was legal. That $250 for those long days were actually less than $75 after expenses.

I wrote on message boards, Glassdoor, and Indeed, among all of the fraudulent reviews, to warn others and I even wrote to government officials including the governor about it to let them know what's going on, and I was disgusted that a governor I voted for who actually said in his campaign that he would address rideshare worker issues, instead, spent a considerable amount of time having emergency meetings about the "L" train (which they ended up doing nothing about) and actually has been all about congestion pricing that would actually hurt drivers - it is clear he (Cuomo) has sights on future offices, and my family, some of my gig worker friends and their families, and I have already vowed that we will never vote for him again.

I had done IC work before in other industries, so I couldn't believe that this type of scam work even existed LEGALLY in the US. As an American, I find it highly hypocritical that the US has chastised labor practices in other countries, like sweatshops, when it exists in broad daylight in modern day in this country through rideshare and some other gig companies.

People say they're grateful for these gig companies and that they were helpful to them in their times of need - I truly do respect others opinions and perceptions, but I am not grateful to them at all. I am actually pissed about their unethical practices and the false representations they have given about the money that is made doing this kind of work, and I feel that if I had been honestly informed, I would've gone straight to Taco Bell (or similar) in the first place and wouldn't have lost all of those hours, taken on all of that risk (including with my health), beat up my vehicle, and had the type of debt I have now. Thankfully, I realized all of this before the point where I had to go bankrupt or worse, before I became homeless like I've heard about some other rideshare drivers, but I sure did get those food stamps and emergency funds to pay my rent that I was eligible for while driving for Uber and Lyft. I never would have believed that I would be in that predicament legally working the equivalent of two to three weeks each week.

I still have my license in another industry that is now picking up again, so I will be doing that part-time in addition to my new job until I pay off my debts. I will never use Uber or Lyft as a patron unless it is for an emergency where I have no choice, and for that instance, if it ever occurs, I collect their free ride coupons (so they wouldn't be profitable) and would be sure to tip my driver well and oversee any reasonable imperfections in their service because I have first hand knowledge of what they're likely making and the risks they're taking for the service they're providing; however, although I don't want to hurt rideshare drivers, I'm more likely to take a cab in that situation because it's hard for me to stomach patronizing those companies.

I'm going to take the opportunity and time I now have with this new job to take whatever classes and get whatever licenses/certifications I can get in industries that are steadily in need and provide decent pay so that I will never be in a position to have to do anything like Uber, Lyft, or DoorDash again.

After the exploitation by these companies, the next worst thing were some of the passengers and restaurant workers I encountered (not the majority of them, but way too many of them). Since I am aware of how this affected my view of people, I will try not to let it affect the way I treat people but I can't un-see what I've already seen. I definitely hope it doesn't affect the way I supervise people in my new role, and I hope for their sakes, they don't unreasonably bad-mouth rideshare drivers in front of me - yes, that wouldn't be fair, but as I've heard time and time again on this site, especially from passengers, that life's not fair sometimes. I won't say which industry I now work in and if I ever get to supervise one or some of those passengers and figure out who they are, it would be poetic justice. And no, I did not put the gigs on my resume - do you seriously think I would've gotten the job if I did?
Congrats and good luck with your new job man.
 

Ubermcbc

Well-Known Member
After months of looking, I finally got a new job that's pretty good. At the point right before I got the job, I was looking at the Taco Bell now hiring signs and wondering which ones I should apply to.

I actually did my last ridedhares in November and moved on to the delivery gigs. In that month, I got into an accident on my way to a pick up (didn't have to report it as a commercial trip, thank goodness). I had already signed up for a couple of the delivery apps and realized I could use the rental my insurance company gave me to do deliveries, which was a bit of a savior. But DoorDash (specifically) was actually a waste of time and gas because that's pretty much all you were making enough money for - your gas to do the job.

Before then, I had been working CRAZY hours doing rideshares in one of the busiest places in the country, used all of the tricks (no pickups over 2-3 miles, drove in areas where people tipped most (I actually was fortunate to get tips every 2 to 3 rides on some days, which I believe has a lot to do with my outgoing personality), didn't wait more than 5 minutes for pick ups, avoided Targets/malls/etc. and trips into zones where I couldn't make pick ups, etc. etc. etc. - you name it, I did it, and read this and another site (but especially this one) religiously for pointers on how to make the most money. Additionally, there are always pings where I worked, whether it's at 4am on a Tuesday morning or during the weekends, so there was no shortage of rides depending on how far you were willing to go for a pick up. I even slept in my vehicle some weekends, getting 6 hours of sleep at a time when sometimes both apps (Uber/Lyft) would kick me off for going over the 12-hour limit (which was really about 13-14 hour limits). I easily did 80-100 hour weeks so I couldn't understand how, like @FormerTaxiDriver♧ , I was slowly going into deep debt. Well, I could understand how, but I couldn't understand how it was legal. That $250 for those long days were actually less than $75 after expenses.

I wrote on message boards, Glassdoor, and Indeed, among all of the fraudulent reviews, to warn others and I even wrote to government officials including the governor about it to let them know what's going on, and I was disgusted that a governor I voted for who actually said in his campaign that he would address rideshare worker issues, instead, spent a considerable amount of time having emergency meetings about the "L" train (which they ended up doing nothing about) and actually has been all about congestion pricing that would actually hurt drivers - it is clear he (Cuomo) has sights on future offices, and my family, some of my gig worker friends and their families, and I have already vowed that we will never vote for him again.

I had done IC work before in other industries, so I couldn't believe that this type of scam work even existed LEGALLY in the US. As an American, I find it highly hypocritical that the US has chastised labor practices in other countries, like sweatshops, when it exists in broad daylight in modern day in this country through rideshare and some other gig companies.

People say they're grateful for these gig companies and that they were helpful to them in their times of need - I truly do respect others opinions and perceptions, but I am not grateful to them at all. I am actually pissed about their unethical practices and the false representations they have given about the money that is made doing this kind of work, and I feel that if I had been honestly informed, I would've gone straight to Taco Bell (or similar) in the first place and wouldn't have lost all of those hours, taken on all of that risk (including with my health), beat up my vehicle, and had the type of debt I have now. Thankfully, I realized all of this before the point where I had to go bankrupt or worse, before I became homeless like I've heard about some other rideshare drivers, but I sure did get those food stamps and emergency funds to pay my rent that I was eligible for while driving for Uber and Lyft. I never would have believed that I would be in that predicament legally working the equivalent of two to three weeks each week.

I still have my license in another industry that is now picking up again, so I will be doing that part-time in addition to my new job until I pay off my debts. I will never use Uber or Lyft as a patron unless it is for an emergency where I have no choice, and for that instance, if it ever occurs, I collect their free ride coupons (so they wouldn't be profitable) and would be sure to tip my driver well and oversee any reasonable imperfections in their service because I have first hand knowledge of what they're likely making and the risks they're taking for the service they're providing; however, although I don't want to hurt rideshare drivers, I'm more likely to take a cab in that situation because it's hard for me to stomach patronizing those companies.

I'm going to take the opportunity and time I now have with this new job to take whatever classes and get whatever licenses/certifications I can get in industries that are steadily in need and provide decent pay so that I will never be in a position to have to do anything like Uber, Lyft, or DoorDash again.

After the exploitation by these companies, the next worst thing were some of the passengers and restaurant workers I encountered (not the majority of them, but way too many of them). Since I am aware of how this affected my view of people, I will try not to let it affect the way I treat people but I can't un-see what I've already seen. I definitely hope it doesn't affect the way I supervise people in my new role, and I hope for their sakes, they don't unreasonably bad-mouth rideshare drivers in front of me - yes, that wouldn't be fair, but as I've heard time and time again on this site, especially from passengers, that life's not fair sometimes. I won't say which industry I now work in and if I ever get to supervise one or some of those passengers and figure out who they are, it would be poetic justice. And no, I did not put the gigs on my resume - do you seriously think I would've gotten the job if I did?

Great input. That's what i have been saying. It's a trap. Still exist in the modern day era. It's going to get worse because now it's not about the SDC. It's all about automation in every industry. Soon this trend is going to effect the whole entire other industries. Low pay will become a norm. Give it a 15-20 years window. May be even less. Guber has just shown us what we all should expect in the future. This whole thing will give the government and the other industry high hopes how to screw the lower and middle class when more and more robotic and automation take over. I hope i am wrong.
 

dryverjohn

Well-Known Member
Congratulations on escaping the servitude of U/L. They are despicable companies and you either sit there and take it or look for better opportunities. I too am 1 foot out the door, but will be trying to change this industry. If nothing else, I know ride share and delivery better than anyone sitting behind a desk writing code.
 

goneubering

Well-Known Member
After months of looking, I finally got a new job that's pretty good. At the point right before I got the job, I was looking at the Taco Bell now hiring signs and wondering which ones I should apply to.

I actually did my last ridedhares in November and moved on to the delivery gigs. In that month, I got into an accident on my way to a pick up (didn't have to report it as a commercial trip, thank goodness). I had already signed up for a couple of the delivery apps and realized I could use the rental my insurance company gave me to do deliveries, which was a bit of a savior. But DoorDash (specifically) was actually a waste of time and gas because that's pretty much all you were making enough money for - your gas to do the job.

Before then, I had been working CRAZY hours doing rideshares in one of the busiest places in the country, used all of the tricks (no pickups over 2-3 miles, drove in areas where people tipped most (I actually was fortunate to get tips every 2 to 3 rides on some days, which I believe has a lot to do with my outgoing personality), didn't wait more than 5 minutes for pick ups, avoided Targets/malls/etc. and trips into zones where I couldn't make pick ups, etc. etc. etc. - you name it, I did it, and read this and another site (but especially this one) religiously for pointers on how to make the most money. Additionally, there are always pings where I worked, whether it's at 4am on a Tuesday morning or during the weekends, so there was no shortage of rides depending on how far you were willing to go for a pick up. I even slept in my vehicle some weekends, getting 6 hours of sleep at a time when sometimes both apps (Uber/Lyft) would kick me off for going over the 12-hour limit (which was really about 13-14 hour limits). I easily did 80-100 hour weeks so I couldn't understand how, like @FormerTaxiDriver♧ , I was slowly going into deep debt. Well, I could understand how, but I couldn't understand how it was legal. That $250 for those long days were actually less than $75 after expenses.

I wrote on message boards, Glassdoor, and Indeed, among all of the fraudulent reviews, to warn others and I even wrote to government officials including the governor about it to let them know what's going on, and I was disgusted that a governor I voted for who actually said in his campaign that he would address rideshare worker issues, instead, spent a considerable amount of time having emergency meetings about the "L" train (which they ended up doing nothing about) and actually has been all about congestion pricing that would actually hurt drivers - it is clear he (Cuomo) has sights on future offices, and my family, some of my gig worker friends and their families, and I have already vowed that we will never vote for him again.

I had done IC work before in other industries, so I couldn't believe that this type of scam work even existed LEGALLY in the US. As an American, I find it highly hypocritical that the US has chastised labor practices in other countries, like sweatshops, when it exists in broad daylight in modern day in this country through rideshare and some other gig companies.

People say they're grateful for these gig companies and that they were helpful to them in their times of need - I truly do respect others opinions and perceptions, but I am not grateful to them at all. I am actually pissed about their unethical practices and the false representations they have given about the money that is made doing this kind of work, and I feel that if I had been honestly informed, I would've gone straight to Taco Bell (or similar) in the first place and wouldn't have lost all of those hours, taken on all of that risk (including with my health), beat up my vehicle, and had the type of debt I have now. Thankfully, I realized all of this before the point where I had to go bankrupt or worse, before I became homeless like I've heard about some other rideshare drivers, but I sure did get those food stamps and emergency funds to pay my rent that I was eligible for while driving for Uber and Lyft. I never would have believed that I would be in that predicament legally working the equivalent of two to three weeks each week.

I still have my license in another industry that is now picking up again, so I will be doing that part-time in addition to my new job until I pay off my debts. I will never use Uber or Lyft as a patron unless it is for an emergency where I have no choice, and for that instance, if it ever occurs, I collect their free ride coupons (so they wouldn't be profitable) and would be sure to tip my driver well and oversee any reasonable imperfections in their service because I have first hand knowledge of what they're likely making and the risks they're taking for the service they're providing; however, although I don't want to hurt rideshare drivers, I'm more likely to take a cab in that situation because it's hard for me to stomach patronizing those companies.

I'm going to take the opportunity and time I now have with this new job to take whatever classes and get whatever licenses/certifications I can get in industries that are steadily in need and provide decent pay so that I will never be in a position to have to do anything like Uber, Lyft, or DoorDash again.

After the exploitation by these companies, the next worst thing were some of the passengers and restaurant workers I encountered (not the majority of them, but way too many of them). Since I am aware of how this affected my view of people, I will try not to let it affect the way I treat people but I can't un-see what I've already seen. I definitely hope it doesn't affect the way I supervise people in my new role, and I hope for their sakes, they don't unreasonably bad-mouth rideshare drivers in front of me - yes, that wouldn't be fair, but as I've heard time and time again on this site, especially from passengers, that life's not fair sometimes. I won't say which industry I now work in and if I ever get to supervise one or some of those passengers and figure out who they are, it would be poetic justice. And no, I did not put the gigs on my resume - do you seriously think I would've gotten the job if I did?

Congrats!!!!
 
Top