New gas stations + price featurefeature

Superduber

Well-Known Member
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Time is money, so it is nice to be able to find gas stations easy. A couple weeks ago I could have used this feature. Was really sweating it out, car was showing xx km to empty counting down, then at some point it switched to a fill up now msg, but without the km countdown, so I wasn't really sure how far I had left to go. I almost misjudged it, filled up and only had .5 litre left in tank! That for sure was the closest I've been to running a tank dry.
 

uber fool

Well-Known Member
once you use pioneer or ultramar you wont ever use anything else.My dad use to use petro until he used ultramar accidentally has never been back to another station
 

Manhoos

Well-Known Member
once you use pioneer or ultramar you wont ever use anything else.My dad use to use petro until he used ultramar accidentally has never been back to another station
There are 3/4 refineries distribute gas, all over Ontario... To me, they all pretty much same.
 

Harry70

Well-Known Member
Still cheapest esso is dupont and bathurst a and costCo can't beat both of them : problem with my nearby lcostco is a long queues at warden: don't have to use application for that: in Brampton gas is cheap as well
 

Harry70

Well-Known Member
It good to know how far is the washroom on the way : especially weekends when its busy; u don't see the app unless it's a request so it won't be distracting; it's usefully in middle of the rides
 

pedro_pendukot

Active Member
I use Petro Canada with a 5 cents/liter off that never runs out. Instead of the liters being deducted on the card (initially you'll get 200 liters), it is adding up. There was a glitch on the card, as of now, my 5 cents off card has 1900 liters.
 

TomP

Active Member
There are 3/4 refineries distribute gas, all over Ontario... To me, they all pretty much same.
The gas may be the same but the detergent additives are different. Some retailers supply Top Tier gas while others do not. From Wikipedia, here is a history of why there is a Top Tier designation for gasoline:

In the late 1980s, automakers became concerned with fuel additives as more advanced fuel injection technology became widely used in new cars. The injectors often became clogged, and the problem was found to be inadequate levels of detergent additives in some gasolines. The automakers began to recommend specific brands of gas with adequate content to their customers. But some fuel marketers were still not using detergents, and in a move supported by the auto industry, the federal government mandated specific levels of additives. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) introduced the minimum gasoline detergent standard in 1995.

However, the new regulations had unintended consequences. The new EPA standards required lower levels of detergent additives than were then being used by a few major fuel marketers. When the new regulations came in, most gasoline marketers who had previously provided higher levels of detergents reduced the level of detergents in their gasolines to meet the new standard. The EPA detergent additive levels were designed to meet emissions standards but not engine longevity standards. Automakers said they were seeing persistent problems such as clogged fuel injectors, and contaminated combustion chambers, resulting in higher emissions and lower fuel economy.

By 2002, the automakers said their repair records suggested that the EPA standard for detergents wasn't high enough, but the EPA was not responsive when they asked them to increase the standards. These concerns were heightened by plans to introduce a new generation of vehicles that would meet the EPA’s “Tier Two” environmental standards for reduced emissions. These vehicles require higher levels of detergents to avoid reduced performance. Cars with direct injection technology (GDI) have been especially prone to carbon buildup, and car makers recommend fuels with higher detergent levels to combat the problem. At first GDI was mainly available in high-end autos, but it is now being used in mid-range cars and economy cars, such as the Hyundai Sonata, Ford Focus and Hyundai Accent.

In 2004 representatives of BMW, General Motors, Honda, and Toyota got together to specify what makes a good fuel. Using recommendations from the Worldwide Fuel Charter, a global committee of automakers and engine manufacturers, they established a proprietary standard for a class of gasoline called "TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline The new standard required increased levels of detergents, and restricted metallic content. Volkswagen/Audi joined the group of automakers in 2007. Gas brands can participate and get a TOP TIER license if they meet certain standards, which includes performance tests for intake valve and combustion chamber deposits, fuel injector fouling, and intake valve sticking. Additive manufacturers pay for the testing, the cost of which varies from year to year, while gasoline companies pay an annual fee based on the number of stations it operates to participate in the program.

In addition to higher detergent levels, Top Tier standards also require that gasolines be free of metallic additives, which can be harmful to the emissions control systems in cars.​
 

James Han

Active Member
The gas may be the same but the detergent additives are different. Some retailers supply Top Tier gas while others do not. From Wikipedia, here is a history of why there is a Top Tier designation for gasoline:

In the late 1980s, automakers became concerned with fuel additives as more advanced fuel injection technology became widely used in new cars. The injectors often became clogged, and the problem was found to be inadequate levels of detergent additives in some gasolines. The automakers began to recommend specific brands of gas with adequate content to their customers. But some fuel marketers were still not using detergents, and in a move supported by the auto industry, the federal government mandated specific levels of additives. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) introduced the minimum gasoline detergent standard in 1995.

However, the new regulations had unintended consequences. The new EPA standards required lower levels of detergent additives than were then being used by a few major fuel marketers. When the new regulations came in, most gasoline marketers who had previously provided higher levels of detergents reduced the level of detergents in their gasolines to meet the new standard. The EPA detergent additive levels were designed to meet emissions standards but not engine longevity standards. Automakers said they were seeing persistent problems such as clogged fuel injectors, and contaminated combustion chambers, resulting in higher emissions and lower fuel economy.

By 2002, the automakers said their repair records suggested that the EPA standard for detergents wasn't high enough, but the EPA was not responsive when they asked them to increase the standards. These concerns were heightened by plans to introduce a new generation of vehicles that would meet the EPA’s “Tier Two” environmental standards for reduced emissions. These vehicles require higher levels of detergents to avoid reduced performance. Cars with direct injection technology (GDI) have been especially prone to carbon buildup, and car makers recommend fuels with higher detergent levels to combat the problem. At first GDI was mainly available in high-end autos, but it is now being used in mid-range cars and economy cars, such as the Hyundai Sonata, Ford Focus and Hyundai Accent.

In 2004 representatives of BMW, General Motors, Honda, and Toyota got together to specify what makes a good fuel. Using recommendations from the Worldwide Fuel Charter, a global committee of automakers and engine manufacturers, they established a proprietary standard for a class of gasoline called "TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline The new standard required increased levels of detergents, and restricted metallic content. Volkswagen/Audi joined the group of automakers in 2007. Gas brands can participate and get a TOP TIER license if they meet certain standards, which includes performance tests for intake valve and combustion chamber deposits, fuel injector fouling, and intake valve sticking. Additive manufacturers pay for the testing, the cost of which varies from year to year, while gasoline companies pay an annual fee based on the number of stations it operates to participate in the program.

In addition to higher detergent levels, Top Tier standards also require that gasolines be free of metallic additives, which can be harmful to the emissions control systems in cars.​
Thanks for your good information, Tomp.
 

Manhoos

Well-Known Member
The gas may be the same but the detergent additives are different. Some retailers supply Top Tier gas while others do not. From Wikipedia, here is a history of why there is a Top Tier designation for gasoline:

In the late 1980s, automakers became concerned with fuel additives as more advanced fuel injection technology became widely used in new cars. The injectors often became clogged, and the problem was found to be inadequate levels of detergent additives in some gasolines. The automakers began to recommend specific brands of gas with adequate content to their customers. But some fuel marketers were still not using detergents, and in a move supported by the auto industry, the federal government mandated specific levels of additives. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) introduced the minimum gasoline detergent standard in 1995.

However, the new regulations had unintended consequences. The new EPA standards required lower levels of detergent additives than were then being used by a few major fuel marketers. When the new regulations came in, most gasoline marketers who had previously provided higher levels of detergents reduced the level of detergents in their gasolines to meet the new standard. The EPA detergent additive levels were designed to meet emissions standards but not engine longevity standards. Automakers said they were seeing persistent problems such as clogged fuel injectors, and contaminated combustion chambers, resulting in higher emissions and lower fuel economy.

By 2002, the automakers said their repair records suggested that the EPA standard for detergents wasn't high enough, but the EPA was not responsive when they asked them to increase the standards. These concerns were heightened by plans to introduce a new generation of vehicles that would meet the EPA’s “Tier Two” environmental standards for reduced emissions. These vehicles require higher levels of detergents to avoid reduced performance. Cars with direct injection technology (GDI) have been especially prone to carbon buildup, and car makers recommend fuels with higher detergent levels to combat the problem. At first GDI was mainly available in high-end autos, but it is now being used in mid-range cars and economy cars, such as the Hyundai Sonata, Ford Focus and Hyundai Accent.

In 2004 representatives of BMW, General Motors, Honda, and Toyota got together to specify what makes a good fuel. Using recommendations from the Worldwide Fuel Charter, a global committee of automakers and engine manufacturers, they established a proprietary standard for a class of gasoline called "TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline The new standard required increased levels of detergents, and restricted metallic content. Volkswagen/Audi joined the group of automakers in 2007. Gas brands can participate and get a TOP TIER license if they meet certain standards, which includes performance tests for intake valve and combustion chamber deposits, fuel injector fouling, and intake valve sticking. Additive manufacturers pay for the testing, the cost of which varies from year to year, while gasoline companies pay an annual fee based on the number of stations it operates to participate in the program.

In addition to higher detergent levels, Top Tier standards also require that gasolines be free of metallic additives, which can be harmful to the emissions control systems in cars.​
In summer all refineries use additives which cause higher price but the formulation could be little different. Hence the overall difference is literally negligible, unless you are using it in a racing car where every millisecond counts..
 

TomP

Active Member
In summer all refineries use additives which cause higher price but the formulation could be little different. Hence the overall difference is literally negligible, unless you are using it in a racing car where every millisecond counts..
Clearly some drivers would have had significant repair bills in connection with clogged fuel injectors and intake valve deposits. If a driver always buys the cheapest gas with the legislated minimum detergents, it still depends on what vehicle is driven and under what conditions and distance and if the purchased gasoline had contaminants as to whether the driver will experience higher repair bills and reduced fuel economy.
 
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