Message to whoever is doing the Lyft Blog - Get Help & Guidance

Silent_Philosodriver

Well-Known Member
To whoever is writing and or selecting the content for the 'Lyft Blog' emails - Get help and someone to review your posts -

https://blog.lyft.com/posts/2016/6/21/driver-mode-off-tour-guide-on

Evidently you (the writer and approver of this piece) don't know how insurance for rideshare works. You cannot 'recommend' or 'feature' a driver who turns off 'driver mode' when driving a passenger around. At that point, all the liability switches to the driver's personal insurance and if there is an accident, any insurance company who gets a claim in this confusing situation will fight it for years to avoid payment. I get it is a personal choice, but still, bad advice for a driver. Period.

Geez Lyft! Try harder please.
 

Euius

Well-Known Member
You cannot 'recommend' or 'feature' a driver who turns off 'driver mode' when driving a passenger around. At that point, all the liability switches to the driver's personal insurance and if there is an accident, any insurance company who gets a claim in this confusing situation will fight it for years to avoid payment. I get it is a personal choice, but still, bad advice for a driver. Period.
You're wrong on how the insurance works. Uber/Lyft insurance covers until the passenger is out of the car, regardless of when you go offline or end the ride.
 

manuella

Well-Known Member
Dude I was thinking the same thing lol plus let's be honest , this guy wanted to just see if it was his lucky day lmao he is just one of those nice guys with no game , didn't know how to say what he(driver) really wanted to say smh
 

Silent_Philosodriver

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
You're wrong on how the insurance works. Uber/Lyft insurance covers until the passenger is out of the car, regardless of when you go offline or end the ride.
Please check the small print rider policy of the James River insurance for Uber as to when coverage applies and under what rules. I will patiently await for your evidence on this beyond your own mind.
 

Silent_Philosodriver

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
Before Euius starts blabbing about whatever is right or wrong - the James River rider policy (for CA) is here and it clearly requires the app to be in active driver mode:

Covered autos are passenger autos being used following the Rideshare Driver's logged and recorded acceptance in the
UberPartner application using account credentials issued under a contract with a Named Insured to provide transportation
services
while the Rideshare Driver is en route to the pick up location of the requested transportation services, or traveling
to the final destination of the requested transportation services, including but not limited to dropping-off of passengers.

So, don't let trolls and misinformation win - moral of the story - Rider on Car = Driver Mode must be on for all insurance coverage to apply. Don't give too many freebies during business hours peeps.
 

stuber

Well-Known Member
I haven't read the James River fine print, nor do I really need to. I simply assume what I know to be true about 99.99% of all insurance companies; they will always seek to relieve themselves of any and all responsibility, whenever possible.

You have no valid insurance when transporting passengers without the app, unless you have a commercial livery insurance policy. Don't let anyone into your car without the app running, and leave the app running until they exit your car. If there's a glitch, and the software falters, I'd pull over and get it restarted.
 

Euius

Well-Known Member
So, don't let trolls and misinformation win - moral of the story - Rider on Car = Driver Mode must be on for all insurance coverage to apply.
Your own quote contradicts your claim

Also here https://newsroom.uber.com/certificates

The first page is for the policy covering the period of time from accepting a trip until the trip has ended and the rider(s) has exiting the vehicle
I won't wait for you to admit your error, I'll just continue with my evening.

Some day you'll grow up and realize that not everybody who disagrees with you is a troll, particularly when you're wrong on the facts
 

Flarpy

Well-Known Member
You're wrong on how the insurance works. Uber/Lyft insurance covers until the passenger is out of the car, regardless of when you go offline or end the ride.
Please cite your sources for this statement. Not saying you're wrong, just want to see proof.
 

RedoBeach

Well-Known Member
Please cite your sources for this statement. Not saying you're wrong, just want to see proof.
This guy NEVER has provided source of information for anything anyone has requested he back up.. So don't hold your horses (or your Ubers).
 

Euius

Well-Known Member
You have no valid insurance when transporting passengers without the app,
Nobody, least of all me, claimed otherwise.

The ride must be dispatched through the app for the commercial insurance to cover. You can then, if you choose, immediately end the ride and drive them around for a week and so long as they never get out of the car (eww) the insurance will continue to cover
 

Fuzzyelvis

Well-Known Member
Before Euius starts blabbing about whatever is right or wrong - the James River rider policy (for CA) is here and it clearly requires the app to be in active driver mode:

Covered autos are passenger autos being used following the Rideshare Driver's logged and recorded acceptance in the
UberPartner application using account credentials issued under a contract with a Named Insured to provide transportation
services
while the Rideshare Driver is en route to the pick up location of the requested transportation services, or traveling
to the final destination of the requested transportation services, including but not limited to dropping-off of passengers.

So, don't let trolls and misinformation win - moral of the story - Rider on Car = Driver Mode must be on for all insurance coverage to apply. Don't give too many freebies during business hours peeps.
In Houston at least, the city ordinance requires the insurance to be in effect until the rider leaves the vehicle. So it likely depends on how "legal" Uber is and what the city has required of them.

I imagine if there were an accident after the ride was ended in the app that the insurance (or Uber, if James River refused) would pay, but the driver woukd be deactivated. The argument for the driver could always be the ride was ended by mistake (I did actually do that once, early in my ubering days, so it's certainly possible, just as forgetting to start a trip can happen. Either way, if the ride was ordered through uber, insurance is in effect in Houston at least.)

If you're driving completely illegally then I don't see you have much to complain about though if James River doesn't want to pay up. You vs uber is just one criminal vs another really.
 
Top