Lysol: nasty to spray on steering wheel and door handles?

BostonTaxiDriver

Well-Known Member
Should we simply refrain from spraying Lysol on surfaces our skin touches, such as the steering wheel, our door handles, pax door handles, climate and radio buttons, blinkers, gear shift, seat belt buckles, etc.?

Maybe the seats and head rest are fine?

When I drove a cab, I used to always spray the steering wheel and various buttons I'd be touching.

But a partner cabbie told me to stop that, as it supposedly smelled, and he'd get headaches.

I now realize certain wipes are for skin, whereas others are strictly for surfaces. I don't think some people realize that, and simply use them interchangeably.

Just don't worry about it during this crisis?

Anybody actually spraying Lysol on the floor, ceiling, seats -- plus any surface our skin readily touches?

WorryWartIsMe?
 

ANT 7

Well-Known Member
I was using the lemon scented Lysol wipes......a little easier on the eyes and nose, and the smell went away in about 30-60 seconds after it dried off.

I wiped by steering wheel, door panels, all handles, consoles, dash, all seats, head rests, etc, etc.........
 

AvisDeene

Well-Known Member
Been applying plain water and slight soap. If soap and water is good enough for your hands, then it is passable for the car. :smiles:
Soap and water is good enough for you hands because the water is running continuously and taking the germs along with it, it doesn’t actually kill the germs. If you use soap and water for the interior of your car, you need to thoroughly rinse it off, otherwise you need a disinfectant like Lysol to actually kill the microorganisms.
 

MissAnne

Well-Known Member
I have been using Clorox disinfecting wipes after every ride, wiping down door handles, seats, everything... but I’m mostly doing Uber eats right now anyway
 

mbd

Well-Known Member
Plastic surfaces - can survive for 3 days
Copper for 3 hours🤔
Cardboard- 1 day

Rapid inactivation of human coronavirus occurs on brass and copper nickel surfaces at room temperature (21°C).
Brasses containing at least 70% copper were very effective at inactivating HuCoV-229E (Fig. 2A), and the rate of inactivation was directly proportional to the percentage of copper. Approximately 103 PFU in a simulated wet-droplet contamination (20 µl per cm2) was inactivated in less than 60 min. Analysis of the early contact time points revealed a lag in inactivation of approximately 10 min followed by very rapid loss of infectivity (Fig. 2B). As observed previously for norovirus, zinc demonstrated a slight antiviral effect compared to that seen with stainless steel (neither metal contains copper).
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Soap and water is good enough for you hands because the water is running continuously and taking the germs along with it, it doesn’t actually kill the germs. If you use soap and water for the interior of your car, you need to thoroughly rinse it off, otherwise you need a disinfectant like Lysol to actually kill the microorganisms.
I read somewhere, soap separates the outer coating of the virus and it gets separated
Actually it was a video that showed how the soap separates the outer coating( protein). It needs about 20 seconds to separate the outer coating.
You can run plain water on your hands for 1 hr, it does not separate the coating.
 
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AvisDeene

Well-Known Member
Plastic surfaces - can survive for 3 days
Copper for 3 hours🤔
Cardboard- 1 day

Rapid inactivation of human coronavirus occurs on brass and copper nickel surfaces at room temperature (21°C).
Brasses containing at least 70% copper were very effective at inactivating HuCoV-229E (Fig. 2A), and the rate of inactivation was directly proportional to the percentage of copper. Approximately 103 PFU in a simulated wet-droplet contamination (20 µl per cm2) was inactivated in less than 60 min. Analysis of the early contact time points revealed a lag in inactivation of approximately 10 min followed by very rapid loss of infectivity (Fig. 2B). As observed previously for norovirus, zinc demonstrated a slight antiviral effect compared to that seen with stainless steel (neither metal contains copper).
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I read somewhere, soap separates the outer coating of the virus and it gets separated
Actually it was a video that showed how the soap separates the outer coating( protein). It needs about 20 seconds to separate the outer coating.
You can run plain water on your hands for 1 hr, it does not separate the coating.
You are correct, I always assumed that the soap just latched onto the virus and the water washes it away, but recently (due to your comment making me do some research) found out that the soap actually breaks the viruses lipid membrane down. The reason we need to scrub thoroughly is to make sure you get all the nooks and crannies of your hands and that the soap is in contact with as much of your skin as possible. Thank you good sir/madam, you learn something new every day.

Here is a link to one article that explains it better than I can:
 

doyousensehumor

Well-Known Member
Even the experts aren't certain on what surfaces are contaminated in a car.

Disinfecting armrests, door handles, switches is straight forward.
Disinfecting cloth seats is more challenging. I don't see a realistic way to 100% disinfect cloth seats after every ride. Big thing todo is don't touch anything, and keep hands off your face.

This is only the secondary way it is transmitted.
Primary is through the air. Small enclosed car full of strangers during an airborne virus epidemic?
Pffft, lost cause IMHO.

Drivers need to assume everyone is infected.
More or less drivers are going to get it.
Those still driving should be realistic...

Continuing to drive = okay with getting sick, assume the risk.

Not willing to take the risk = don't drive pax then.

Delivery is safer. It also happens to be busier than driving pax too. Assume every surface is a biohazard, every person you encounter is sick.

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