Lyft opened up the app

Mista T

Well-Known Member
Author
Checking emails on my phone, first thing in the morning. Finished, and swiped the email app to close it.

There was Lyft, the app opened up, telling me it needed me to update something.

I never opened it! I'm sickened that a company can get away with hijacking my phone.

I needed to take a pic of something, in order to provide the update. When I clicked on Update, I was expecting Lyft to ask permission to use my camera. But Lyft had already given itself permission!

I really hate this company. Haven't driven for them in about 2 months. Wish there was more I could do to hold them legally accountable.
 

Ian Richard Markham

Well-Known Member
Checking emails on my phone, first thing in the morning. Finished, and swiped the email app to close it.

There was Lyft, the app opened up, telling me it needed me to update something.

I never opened it! I'm sickened that a company can get away with hijacking my phone.

I needed to take a pic of something, in order to provide the update. When I clicked on Update, I was expecting Lyft to ask permission to use my camera. But Lyft had already given itself permission!
I really hate this company. Haven't driven for them in about 2 months. Wish there was more I could do to hold them legally accountable.
You see man ever since you read through the entire Uber algorithm patent application you know how this stuff works. Try to make a spreadsheet sometime of every single one of your Uber trips. Impossible and I have tried hard at it and if you ever start to get close then pages start to error.

There is verbiage contained at https://uber.com/legal fully admitting that the driver app also installs a web caddy that alters your google search results. Do this trick sometime. Go to the public library and use one of their computers but do not log into any of your personal accounts. Run an anonymous search of something Uber related on the public computer and run the same search at the same time on your cellphone. Then admire the differences.
 

DriverMark

Well-Known Member
Checking emails on my phone, first thing in the morning. Finished, and swiped the email app to close it.

There was Lyft, the app opened up, telling me it needed me to update something.

I never opened it! I'm sickened that a company can get away with hijacking my phone.

I needed to take a pic of something, in order to provide the update. When I clicked on Update, I was expecting Lyft to ask permission to use my camera. But Lyft had already given itself permission!

I really hate this company. Haven't driven for them in about 2 months. Wish there was more I could do to hold them legally accountable.
Never gave Lyft App permission at some point in the past? Only need to give the permission once. It could have been years ago. To remove permission you need to go to the App Settings on the phone and take it away.

The app being opened though is disturbing.
 

Lil'Lyftie

Well-Known Member
You see man ever since you read through the entire Uber algorithm patent application you know how this stuff works. Try to make a spreadsheet sometime of every single one of your Uber trips. Impossible and I have tried hard at it and if you ever start to get close then pages start to error.

There is verbiage contained at https://uber.com/legal fully admitting that the driver app also installs a web caddy that alters your google search results. Do this trick sometime. Go to the public library and use one of their computers but do not log into any of your personal accounts. Run an anonymous search of something Uber related on the public computer and run the same search at the same time on your cellphone. Then admire the differences.
There's so much drivel posted on here daily, why do I even try to post corrections? But in this instance, here goes: all major search engines retain information on your past searches and attempt to detect patterns, so that future searches produce - what the search engines believe - to be more relevant results for you. The patterns they detect may not be obvious to you. Say, you searched for "protect my 2nd Amendment rights". Unbeknownst to you, the vast databases of the company behind the search engine may have detected a pattern that people who search for that issue also have a higher instance of searching for "how to grow my tiny willie". So when you search for "p en is pics" , you'll get a response set more weighted towards male enhancement solutions. You might be perfectly happy with your tiny member, so the search engine's deduction about your assumed preference was wrong in that case, but it holds true for many others like you. This is nothing nefarious, but something you enabled yourself by personalizing your web browser, and/or by allowing cookies. Instead of making the effort to run to your public library (where you run the risk of seeing search results optimized for the last ten users at that public workstation), you can just delete the cookies on your computer and re-install the web browser (and then don't log on with your personal profile, because that pulls your stored preferences from the browser company's servers). If you do that you have a clean browser set-up, and the whole cycle of the browser collecting data from your searches starts anew.
This is no conspiracy, and there's no deep state spying on you. But, should you firmly believe in those things, a tinfoil hat is guaranteed to keep government agents from plugging into your brain waves. Wear it daily!
 

Wonkytonk

Well-Known Member
Checking emails on my phone, first thing in the morning. Finished, and swiped the email app to close it.

There was Lyft, the app opened up, telling me it needed me to update something.

I never opened it! I'm sickened that a company can get away with hijacking my phone.

I needed to take a pic of something, in order to provide the update. When I clicked on Update, I was expecting Lyft to ask permission to use my camera. But Lyft had already given itself permission!

I really hate this company. Haven't driven for them in about 2 months. Wish there was more I could do to hold them legally accountable.
Android or Iphone? If Android assuming you have the most recent version you're in a bit of luck. With the most recent version of Android you can Force Stop applications. Also limit permissions but you could do that before. With iphone it's a crapshoot you don't know what you're getting, or getting into.

Best practice is to use the app and then at the end of the driving day Force Stop the app by long pressing the app icon select app info and from the app info screen select Force Stop. It kills the app dead in its tracks.

Also from that screen you can select permissions. Make sure the only permission either app has is location and only while in use. That will force them to ask for camera use when it demands you take a picture for verification. A pain, but worth it for the sense of personal privacy security.
 

Mista T

Well-Known Member
Author
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I have android.

I was minding my own business, and the app turned on and demanded that I update insurance info. I decided to do it ... and noticed the camera permissions had been turned on somehow also.

I updated the insurance info, turned off camera permissions (once again), and left the app on for 5 hours to ignore pings. Then i double-checked Uber to make sure my camera permissions were still off (they were).

I haven't driven for Lyft in over a month, and doubt I ever will again at this point. But I updated insurance anyway, in case I change my mind.
 

Benjamin M

Well-Known Member
I have android.

I was minding my own business, and the app turned on and demanded that I update insurance info. I decided to do it ... and noticed the camera permissions had been turned on somehow also.

I updated the insurance info, turned off camera permissions (once again), and left the app on for 5 hours to ignore pings. Then i double-checked Uber to make sure my camera permissions were still off (they were).

I haven't driven for Lyft in over a month, and doubt I ever will again at this point. But I updated insurance anyway, in case I change my mind.
I pitty the fool that doesn't like you! And I do.

I have programmed Android native apps. "Permissions" are annoying for developers because people panic about them sometimes. And, Android OS has become increasingly secure, such as saying "such and such app requested your location in the background", which caused panic in a similar thread.

Android user since smart phones existed, developer for years. What you are describing is not technically possible. Period.

But I will say that there has been a rash of Android malware recently. I'll give you the benefit of doubt that may have been the cause. And if anyone thinks that iOS is immune, think again.
 

AngelAdams

Well-Known Member
Checking emails on my phone, first thing in the morning. Finished, and swiped the email app to close it.

There was Lyft, the app opened up, telling me it needed me to update something.

I never opened it! I'm sickened that a company can get away with hijacking my phone.

I needed to take a pic of something, in order to provide the update. When I clicked on Update, I was expecting Lyft to ask permission to use my camera. But Lyft had already given itself permission!

I really hate this company. Haven't driven for them in about 2 months. Wish there was more I could do to hold them legally accountable.
Try deleting the app.
 
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