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Lyft New App (Review)

This is a review of Lyft’s new app for android, just released at the end of February 2019. The review covers the pros, cons, and oversights of a significant new update. This will be a two part review, with this first part focusing on the ping and ride experience, with the second part focusing on administrative features.

As usual, I became part of a hidden beta test group for Lyft’s new app near the beginning of February. The original release which I did not ask for was very buggy which was unappreciated by me, but Lyft snuck out a final version of the release without telling members of the beta test group. Some of the bugs were glaring — the PT percentage was missing entirely — but when I noticed the new version in the Google Playstore, I downloaded it and some of those problems were fixed. What follows is a review of this final version.


The Ping - The ping circle itself is still presented in the lower middle part of the screen. This is the most glaring oversight in the new update which has inexplicably plagued Lyft for a long time. The crux of the problem is that between rides, drivers will be texting their spouses, answering emails, playing toon blast or chess, opening other apps, etc etc. Almost all of these activities involved touch typing on the keypad which is always located in the lower middle part of the device, or otherwise touching the area on the bottom half of the device. This means that when a ping eventually comes, there will be a huge number of false acceptances when drivers were trying to touch “send this email” but accidentally accepted the ping in the nanosecond that it appeared on top of the keypad. These false acceptances are almost always canceled by drivers, at least I suspect so because that is what I do in every case. Lyft should move that ping acceptance circle to the middle-top of the device, but after so long of a faulty design I now feel like a nagging spouse.

Meta information in the ping circle - The ping circle includes some new information. There is a 60+ minutes notification (or is it 60 miles?) in addition to the usual 45+ which is helpful, but the most helpful new addition is information about the location. If known, the ping circle will now present information like “Alhambra High School”, “John Muir Medical Center”, “Old Fuddy Duddy Retirement Home”, “Walmart 24th Street”, “Safeway Downtown”, “Honda Repair Shop”, etc. In all of these examples I’ve given, this is a new way that drivers can avoid these undesirable passenger pings, so I think this is not Lyft’s intended consequence, but it is a plus for drivers to have new clues about poor pickup locations to avoid.

Prime Time Percent - The prime time percentage is shown in a giant new banner in the middle of the screen, somewhat above the ping circle, which is enormously oversized in a showy lime green color. The presentation of the PT pct contrasts pretty horribly with the pink ping circle below it, which results in a confused muddle for drivers to synthesize quickly. This presentation breaks one of the cardinal rules of application design. The main goal of an application design is to get the user to quickly focus on the important information or action desired by the developer. The action desired is “hey, click this ping circle”, but it gets lost in the Christmas Tree effect of the rest of the screen. This mess of a presentation leads to a distracted driver, whose hesitation can even be dangerous on the road.

Long Trip Notifications - What’s actually good is that Lyft is finally presenting PT% on long-trip notifications. And as mentioned, there is now a 60+ notification. As I’ve seen no examples in two weeks, I still believe that Lyft is NOT showing long-trip notifications on Shared rides, which is another silly oversight.

Arrival - Lyft is now requiring drivers be very very close to the passenger before clicking "arrived". You can still do it at a normal place of approach, but it requires another level of clicks while driving which endangers the life of the driver while driving in busy streets. And if you do click "arrived" a block away, in addition to this new layer of spammy clicks Lyft requires, you will not be eligible for a cancellation fee. In addition to having more accidents, the consequence of this change is that drivers will now automatically cancel in gated communities where they cannot physically get close enough to the passengers location, and in busy areas like the financial district in San Francisco where you have to click "arrived" a stoplight beforehand to get the passenger out on the street looking for you where there is no parking. Which brings me to cancellation reasons........

Cancellation Reasons - I'm not going to opine about how long drivers should reallyyyy have to wait before canceling a trip (it's still five minutes), but when a trip does need to be canceled Lyft continues to endanger drivers. There is STILL no ability to cancel a ride for legitimate legal reasons. There needs to be a "missing baby seat" and "unaccompanied minor" category which does NOT count against a driver's cancellation rate. Because ALL canceled trips are counted against the driver, even when required by law, drivers will continue to sit in the proximity of the angry passenger for five minutes until she can cancel the ride for a cancellation fee. Some drivers won't wait that long and will cancel anyway, which Lyft counts against them and will use to deactivate them. By the way, this problem exposes Lyft to another future class action lawsuit that should worry investors, because ANYONE who has been deactivated from Lyft for high cancellations has a claim.

Scheduled rides - There is a disturbing new action on scheduled rides. When you go online now for a scheduled ride, you will get pings for other rides that are nearer you. Lyft should have learned long ago that their original implementation of scheduled rides was a disaster for PASSENGERS. They fixed scheduled rides over a year ago, so to bring back one of the truly awful mistakes in their original implementation of scheduled rides is absolutely appalling. On the flip side, if you ignore the unwanted pings my experience is that you will eventually get the ping for the ride you signed up for and the passenger will be happy that you chose them.

Destination filters - Still six uses, still 30 minutes each. They have changed how they work at airports now which I’ll explain if someone asks in the comments.

On/Off Toggle - The online/offline switch is still at the top of the screen away from all the other activities that drivers do between rides. This is a a good thing (still) and something that Uber should learn from.


All in all, this new Lyft update misses the mark. It does include some things drivers have been wanting for years, such as PT percentage on long rides, but some of the very basic design flaws that should have been fixed years ago are still present and they have gone backwards in a few areas.

Part 2 of this review will look under the hood at the administrative features of the new update.
 

Comments

Skepticaldriver

Well-Known Member
Lol. Uber and lyft are for the riders. Not drivers. But really. Theyre for themselves. Its insane anyone getting into them now
 

Pax Collector

Well-Known Member
There is a disturbing new action on scheduled rides. When you go online now for a scheduled ride, you will get pings for other rides that are nearer you.
They did that even with the old app. I guess they still haven't fixed the issue.


Destination filters - Still six uses, still 30 minutes each. They have changed how they work at airports now which I’ll explain if someone asks in the comments.
Ok, Cliffhanger, tell us how it works now.
 

welikecamping

Well-Known Member
Something that tripped me up lately is the personal power zone. It is only active for a limited time, but it appears long before it's active. So, I'm in the zone, get a ping and don't get the additional credit. Why? ping was 7 minutes before the zone was active. Had I known the zone was not active, I would not have been there.

Another thing - I come from the software testing world and where I worked, you ALWAYS got release notes which described the feature and how it is supposed to work. I have yet to see a release note from Lyft.
 

GTADriver

Active Member
This is a review of Lyft’s new app for android, just released at the end of February 2019. The review covers the pros, cons, and oversights of a significant new update. This will be a two part review, with this first part focusing on the ping and ride experience, with the second part focusing on administrative features.

As usual, I became part of a hidden beta test group for Lyft’s new app near the beginning of February. The original release which I did not ask for was very buggy which was unappreciated by me, but Lyft snuck out a final version of the release without telling members of the beta test group. Some of the bugs were glaring — the PT percentage was missing entirely — but when I noticed the new version in the Google Playstore, I downloaded it and some of those problems were fixed. What follows is a review of this final version.


The Ping - The ping circle itself is still presented in the lower middle part of the screen. This is the most glaring oversight in the new update which has inexplicably plagued Lyft for a long time. The crux of the problem is that between rides, drivers will be texting their spouses, answering emails, playing toon blast or chess, opening other apps, etc etc. Almost all of these activities involved touch typing on the keypad which is always located in the lower middle part of the device, or otherwise touching the area on the bottom half of the device. This means that when a ping eventually comes, there will be a huge number of false acceptances when drivers were trying to touch “send this email” but accidentally accepted the ping in the nanosecond that it appeared on top of the keypad. These false acceptances are almost always canceled by drivers, at least I suspect so because that is what I do in every case. Lyft should move that ping acceptance circle to the middle-top of the device, but after so long of a faulty design I now feel like a nagging spouse.

Meta information in the ping circle - The ping circle includes some new information. There is a 60+ minutes notification (or is it 60 miles?) in addition to the usual 45+ which is helpful, but the most helpful new addition is information about the location. If known, the ping circle will now present information like “Alhambra High School”, “John Muir Medical Center”, “Old Fuddy Duddy Retirement Home”, “Walmart 24th Street”, “Safeway Downtown”, “Honda Repair Shop”, etc. In all of these examples I’ve given, this is a new way that drivers can avoid these undesirable passenger pings, so I think this is not Lyft’s intended consequence, but it is a plus for drivers to have new clues about poor pickup locations to avoid.

Prime Time Percent - The prime time percentage is shown in a giant new banner in the middle of the screen, somewhat above the ping circle, which is enormously oversized in a showy lime green color. The presentation of the PT pct contrasts pretty horribly with the pink ping circle below it, which results in a confused muddle for drivers to synthesize quickly. This presentation breaks one of the cardinal rules of application design. The main goal of an application design is to get the user to quickly focus on the important information or action desired by the developer. The action desired is “hey, click this ping circle”, but it gets lost in the Christmas Tree effect of the rest of the screen. This mess of a presentation leads to a distracted driver, whose hesitation can even be dangerous on the road.

Long Trip Notifications - What’s actually good is that Lyft is finally presenting PT% on long-trip notifications. And as mentioned, there is now a 60+ notification. As I’ve seen no examples in two weeks, I still believe that Lyft is NOT showing long-trip notifications on Shared rides, which is another silly oversight.

Arrival - Lyft is now requiring drivers be very very close to the passenger before clicking "arrived". You can still do it at a normal place of approach, but it requires another level of clicks while driving which endangers the life of the driver while driving in busy streets. And if you do click "arrived" a block away, in addition to this new layer of spammy clicks Lyft requires, you will not be eligible for a cancellation fee. In addition to having more accidents, the consequence of this change is that drivers will now automatically cancel in gated communities where they cannot physically get close enough to the passengers location, and in busy areas like the financial district in San Francisco where you have to click "arrived" a stoplight beforehand to get the passenger out on the street looking for you where there is no parking. Which brings me to cancellation reasons........

Cancellation Reasons - I'm not going to opine about how long drivers should reallyyyy have to wait before canceling a trip (it's still five minutes), but when a trip does need to be canceled Lyft continues to endanger drivers. There is STILL no ability to cancel a ride for legitimate legal reasons. There needs to be a "missing baby seat" and "unaccompanied minor" category which does NOT count against a driver's cancellation rate. Because ALL canceled trips are counted against the driver, even when required by law, drivers will continue to sit in the proximity of the angry passenger for five minutes until she can cancel the ride for a cancellation fee. Some drivers won't wait that long and will cancel anyway, which Lyft counts against them and will use to deactivate them. By the way, this problem exposes Lyft to another future class action lawsuit that should worry investors, because ANYONE who has been deactivated from Lyft for high cancellations has a claim.

Scheduled rides - There is a disturbing new action on scheduled rides. When you go online now for a scheduled ride, you will get pings for other rides that are nearer you. Lyft should have learned long ago that their original implementation of scheduled rides was a disaster for PASSENGERS. They fixed scheduled rides over a year ago, so to bring back one of the truly awful mistakes in their original implementation of scheduled rides is absolutely appalling. On the flip side, if you ignore the unwanted pings my experience is that you will eventually get the ping for the ride you signed up for and the passenger will be happy that you chose them.

Destination filters - Still six uses, still 30 minutes each. They have changed how they work at airports now which I’ll explain if someone asks in the comments.

On/Off Toggle - The online/offline switch is still at the top of the screen away from all the other activities that drivers do between rides. This is a a good thing (still) and something that Uber should learn from.


All in all, this new Lyft update misses the mark. It does include some things drivers have been wanting for years, such as PT percentage on long rides, but some of the very basic design flaws that should have been fixed years ago are still present and they have gone backwards in a few areas.

Part 2 of this review will look under the hood at the administrative features of the new update.
post screen shots of your new app. i want to compare it with mine.
 

Dropking

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
post screen shots of your new app. i want to compare it with mine.
Sigh, I know. Sorry but I'm too lazy.
Post automatically merged:

Something that tripped me up lately is the personal power zone. It is only active for a limited time, but it appears long before it's active. So, I'm in the zone, get a ping and don't get the additional credit. Why? ping was 7 minutes before the zone was active. Had I known the zone was not active, I would not have been there.

Another thing - I come from the software testing world and where I worked, you ALWAYS got release notes which described the feature and how it is supposed to work. I have yet to see a release note from Lyft.
Lyft does not do release notes. They don't have great quality control over their stuff and underpay their workers so we should not expect a normal approach.
Post automatically merged:

They did that even with the old app. I guess they still haven't fixed the issue.



Ok, Cliffhanger, tell us how it works now.
In the old app, in my market, they stopped these spammy pings over a year ago. Now the are back which is going to lead to a poor experience by passengers who will now, more often, have a driver show up who is clueless about their important ride.

The cliffhanger is that Lyft will now ask the driver if he wants to leave the airport queue after dropoff, before just terminating the DF. So you can keep your destination filter intact, but you will not get a rematch at the airport while in DF. This was possible over the last couple of months - a rematch at airports while in DF mode, but if there was no rematch after 2 minutes then Lyft would kill of your DF. Now you can keep it but no rematch and you will need to exit the airport.
 
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Pax Collector

Well-Known Member
The cliffhanger is that Lyft will now ask the driver if he wants to leave the airport queue after dropoff, before just terminating the DF. So you can keep your destination filter intact, but you will not get a rematch at the airport while in DF. This was possible over the last couple of months - a rematch at airports while in DF mode, but if there was no rematch after 2 minutes then Lyft would kill of your DF. Now you can keep it but no rematch and you will need to exit the airport
Thanks for the explanation.

I miss having DF at airports. Everytime I ended up in the city I used to go to SFO, set my destination to the South Bay and get a 45+ ping in a half hour or so. I did the same when I was stuck in the East Bay. Set DF at OAK and always found rides that took me home.
 

Rosalita

Active Member
Notice the new "Arrived" problem right away at the airport where a new pax pick up location was designated a few weeks ago. Seems that Lyft wants you to wait until you turn that corner at Arrivals before you tap "Arrived." It plays twenty questions as to why you would tap "Arrive" when you have not "Arrived." However, I have "arrived" and it's Lyft that doesn't know it! Trying to read all the questions associated with "Arrived" is horrible" The traffic jams, people walking out in front of other vehicles,searching for your pax, avoiding a vehicle collision, etc.
Post automatically merged:

Schedule Rides: Uh, getting pinged for other rides and being jammed with them instead of your scheduled ride IS NOT NEW! Lyft's been jerking drivers around in my area since I started driving over a year ago on these scheduled rides. Jam you with 5 in-a-row that you don't want while awaiting the scheduled one and yes, it counts against your acceptance rating. Got so disturbed I quit taking scheduled rides and was extremely unhappy with Lyft's explanation on how it is a schedule ride doesn't materialize while you're sitting there waiting for it! Tired of messing with Support. They're part of the problem.
Post automatically merged:

This is a review of Lyft’s new app for android, just released at the end of February 2019. The review covers the pros, cons, and oversights of a significant new update. This will be a two part review, with this first part focusing on the ping and ride experience, with the second part focusing on administrative features.

As usual, I became part of a hidden beta test group for Lyft’s new app near the beginning of February. The original release which I did not ask for was very buggy which was unappreciated by me, but Lyft snuck out a final version of the release without telling members of the beta test group. Some of the bugs were glaring — the PT percentage was missing entirely — but when I noticed the new version in the Google Playstore, I downloaded it and some of those problems were fixed. What follows is a review of this final version.


The Ping - The ping circle itself is still presented in the lower middle part of the screen. This is the most glaring oversight in the new update which has inexplicably plagued Lyft for a long time. The crux of the problem is that between rides, drivers will be texting their spouses, answering emails, playing toon blast or chess, opening other apps, etc etc. Almost all of these activities involved touch typing on the keypad which is always located in the lower middle part of the device, or otherwise touching the area on the bottom half of the device. This means that when a ping eventually comes, there will be a huge number of false acceptances when drivers were trying to touch “send this email” but accidentally accepted the ping in the nanosecond that it appeared on top of the keypad. These false acceptances are almost always canceled by drivers, at least I suspect so because that is what I do in every case. Lyft should move that ping acceptance circle to the middle-top of the device, but after so long of a faulty design I now feel like a nagging spouse.

Meta information in the ping circle - The ping circle includes some new information. There is a 60+ minutes notification (or is it 60 miles?) in addition to the usual 45+ which is helpful, but the most helpful new addition is information about the location. If known, the ping circle will now present information like “Alhambra High School”, “John Muir Medical Center”, “Old Fuddy Duddy Retirement Home”, “Walmart 24th Street”, “Safeway Downtown”, “Honda Repair Shop”, etc. In all of these examples I’ve given, this is a new way that drivers can avoid these undesirable passenger pings, so I think this is not Lyft’s intended consequence, but it is a plus for drivers to have new clues about poor pickup locations to avoid.

Prime Time Percent - The prime time percentage is shown in a giant new banner in the middle of the screen, somewhat above the ping circle, which is enormously oversized in a showy lime green color. The presentation of the PT pct contrasts pretty horribly with the pink ping circle below it, which results in a confused muddle for drivers to synthesize quickly. This presentation breaks one of the cardinal rules of application design. The main goal of an application design is to get the user to quickly focus on the important information or action desired by the developer. The action desired is “hey, click this ping circle”, but it gets lost in the Christmas Tree effect of the rest of the screen. This mess of a presentation leads to a distracted driver, whose hesitation can even be dangerous on the road.

Long Trip Notifications - What’s actually good is that Lyft is finally presenting PT% on long-trip notifications. And as mentioned, there is now a 60+ notification. As I’ve seen no examples in two weeks, I still believe that Lyft is NOT showing long-trip notifications on Shared rides, which is another silly oversight.

Arrival - Lyft is now requiring drivers be very very close to the passenger before clicking "arrived". You can still do it at a normal place of approach, but it requires another level of clicks while driving which endangers the life of the driver while driving in busy streets. And if you do click "arrived" a block away, in addition to this new layer of spammy clicks Lyft requires, you will not be eligible for a cancellation fee. In addition to having more accidents, the consequence of this change is that drivers will now automatically cancel in gated communities where they cannot physically get close enough to the passengers location, and in busy areas like the financial district in San Francisco where you have to click "arrived" a stoplight beforehand to get the passenger out on the street looking for you where there is no parking. Which brings me to cancellation reasons........

Cancellation Reasons - I'm not going to opine about how long drivers should reallyyyy have to wait before canceling a trip (it's still five minutes), but when a trip does need to be canceled Lyft continues to endanger drivers. There is STILL no ability to cancel a ride for legitimate legal reasons. There needs to be a "missing baby seat" and "unaccompanied minor" category which does NOT count against a driver's cancellation rate. Because ALL canceled trips are counted against the driver, even when required by law, drivers will continue to sit in the proximity of the angry passenger for five minutes until she can cancel the ride for a cancellation fee. Some drivers won't wait that long and will cancel anyway, which Lyft counts against them and will use to deactivate them. By the way, this problem exposes Lyft to another future class action lawsuit that should worry investors, because ANYONE who has been deactivated from Lyft for high cancellations has a claim.

Scheduled rides - There is a disturbing new action on scheduled rides. When you go online now for a scheduled ride, you will get pings for other rides that are nearer you. Lyft should have learned long ago that their original implementation of scheduled rides was a disaster for PASSENGERS. They fixed scheduled rides over a year ago, so to bring back one of the truly awful mistakes in their original implementation of scheduled rides is absolutely appalling. On the flip side, if you ignore the unwanted pings my experience is that you will eventually get the ping for the ride you signed up for and the passenger will be happy that you chose them.

Destination filters - Still six uses, still 30 minutes each. They have changed how they work at airports now which I’ll explain if someone asks in the comments.

On/Off Toggle - The online/offline switch is still at the top of the screen away from all the other activities that drivers do between rides. This is a a good thing (still) and something that Uber should learn from.


All in all, this new Lyft update misses the mark. It does include some things drivers have been wanting for years, such as PT percentage on long rides, but some of the very basic design flaws that should have been fixed years ago are still present and they have gone backwards in a few areas.

Part 2 of this review will look under the hood at the administrative features of the new update.

I agree. It's like Lyft is regressing as a company not evolving. I find their entire sh--- show immature, condescending, and lacking. I'm here for the money. Is there any other reason to be here?
 
Last edited:

Crosbyandstarsky

Active Member
This is a review of Lyft’s new app for android, just released at the end of February 2019. The review covers the pros, cons, and oversights of a significant new update. This will be a two part review, with this first part focusing on the ping and ride experience, with the second part focusing on administrative features.

As usual, I became part of a hidden beta test group for Lyft’s new app near the beginning of February. The original release which I did not ask for was very buggy which was unappreciated by me, but Lyft snuck out a final version of the release without telling members of the beta test group. Some of the bugs were glaring — the PT percentage was missing entirely — but when I noticed the new version in the Google Playstore, I downloaded it and some of those problems were fixed. What follows is a review of this final version.


The Ping - The ping circle itself is still presented in the lower middle part of the screen. This is the most glaring oversight in the new update which has inexplicably plagued Lyft for a long time. The crux of the problem is that between rides, drivers will be texting their spouses, answering emails, playing toon blast or chess, opening other apps, etc etc. Almost all of these activities involved touch typing on the keypad which is always located in the lower middle part of the device, or otherwise touching the area on the bottom half of the device. This means that when a ping eventually comes, there will be a huge number of false acceptances when drivers were trying to touch “send this email” but accidentally accepted the ping in the nanosecond that it appeared on top of the keypad. These false acceptances are almost always canceled by drivers, at least I suspect so because that is what I do in every case. Lyft should move that ping acceptance circle to the middle-top of the device, but after so long of a faulty design I now feel like a nagging spouse.

Meta information in the ping circle - The ping circle includes some new information. There is a 60+ minutes notification (or is it 60 miles?) in addition to the usual 45+ which is helpful, but the most helpful new addition is information about the location. If known, the ping circle will now present information like “Alhambra High School”, “John Muir Medical Center”, “Old Fuddy Duddy Retirement Home”, “Walmart 24th Street”, “Safeway Downtown”, “Honda Repair Shop”, etc. In all of these examples I’ve given, this is a new way that drivers can avoid these undesirable passenger pings, so I think this is not Lyft’s intended consequence, but it is a plus for drivers to have new clues about poor pickup locations to avoid.

Prime Time Percent - The prime time percentage is shown in a giant new banner in the middle of the screen, somewhat above the ping circle, which is enormously oversized in a showy lime green color. The presentation of the PT pct contrasts pretty horribly with the pink ping circle below it, which results in a confused muddle for drivers to synthesize quickly. This presentation breaks one of the cardinal rules of application design. The main goal of an application design is to get the user to quickly focus on the important information or action desired by the developer. The action desired is “hey, click this ping circle”, but it gets lost in the Christmas Tree effect of the rest of the screen. This mess of a presentation leads to a distracted driver, whose hesitation can even be dangerous on the road.

Long Trip Notifications - What’s actually good is that Lyft is finally presenting PT% on long-trip notifications. And as mentioned, there is now a 60+ notification. As I’ve seen no examples in two weeks, I still believe that Lyft is NOT showing long-trip notifications on Shared rides, which is another silly oversight.

Arrival - Lyft is now requiring drivers be very very close to the passenger before clicking "arrived". You can still do it at a normal place of approach, but it requires another level of clicks while driving which endangers the life of the driver while driving in busy streets. And if you do click "arrived" a block away, in addition to this new layer of spammy clicks Lyft requires, you will not be eligible for a cancellation fee. In addition to having more accidents, the consequence of this change is that drivers will now automatically cancel in gated communities where they cannot physically get close enough to the passengers location, and in busy areas like the financial district in San Francisco where you have to click "arrived" a stoplight beforehand to get the passenger out on the street looking for you where there is no parking. Which brings me to cancellation reasons........

Cancellation Reasons - I'm not going to opine about how long drivers should reallyyyy have to wait before canceling a trip (it's still five minutes), but when a trip does need to be canceled Lyft continues to endanger drivers. There is STILL no ability to cancel a ride for legitimate legal reasons. There needs to be a "missing baby seat" and "unaccompanied minor" category which does NOT count against a driver's cancellation rate. Because ALL canceled trips are counted against the driver, even when required by law, drivers will continue to sit in the proximity of the angry passenger for five minutes until she can cancel the ride for a cancellation fee. Some drivers won't wait that long and will cancel anyway, which Lyft counts against them and will use to deactivate them. By the way, this problem exposes Lyft to another future class action lawsuit that should worry investors, because ANYONE who has been deactivated from Lyft for high cancellations has a claim.

Scheduled rides - There is a disturbing new action on scheduled rides. When you go online now for a scheduled ride, you will get pings for other rides that are nearer you. Lyft should have learned long ago that their original implementation of scheduled rides was a disaster for PASSENGERS. They fixed scheduled rides over a year ago, so to bring back one of the truly awful mistakes in their original implementation of scheduled rides is absolutely appalling. On the flip side, if you ignore the unwanted pings my experience is that you will eventually get the ping for the ride you signed up for and the passenger will be happy that you chose them.

Destination filters - Still six uses, still 30 minutes each. They have changed how they work at airports now which I’ll explain if someone asks in the comments.

On/Off Toggle - The online/offline switch is still at the top of the screen away from all the other activities that drivers do between rides. This is a a good thing (still) and something that Uber should learn from.


All in all, this new Lyft update misses the mark. It does include some things drivers have been wanting for years, such as PT percentage on long rides, but some of the very basic design flaws that should have been fixed years ago are still present and they have gone backwards in a few areas.

Part 2 of this review will look under the hood at the administrative features of the new update.
Some of this is just your opinion I don’t agree with
Post automatically merged:

This is a review of Lyft’s new app for android, just released at the end of February 2019. The review covers the pros, cons, and oversights of a significant new update. This will be a two part review, with this first part focusing on the ping and ride experience, with the second part focusing on administrative features.

As usual, I became part of a hidden beta test group for Lyft’s new app near the beginning of February. The original release which I did not ask for was very buggy which was unappreciated by me, but Lyft snuck out a final version of the release without telling members of the beta test group. Some of the bugs were glaring — the PT percentage was missing entirely — but when I noticed the new version in the Google Playstore, I downloaded it and some of those problems were fixed. What follows is a review of this final version.


The Ping - The ping circle itself is still presented in the lower middle part of the screen. This is the most glaring oversight in the new update which has inexplicably plagued Lyft for a long time. The crux of the problem is that between rides, drivers will be texting their spouses, answering emails, playing toon blast or chess, opening other apps, etc etc. Almost all of these activities involved touch typing on the keypad which is always located in the lower middle part of the device, or otherwise touching the area on the bottom half of the device. This means that when a ping eventually comes, there will be a huge number of false acceptances when drivers were trying to touch “send this email” but accidentally accepted the ping in the nanosecond that it appeared on top of the keypad. These false acceptances are almost always canceled by drivers, at least I suspect so because that is what I do in every case. Lyft should move that ping acceptance circle to the middle-top of the device, but after so long of a faulty design I now feel like a nagging spouse.

Meta information in the ping circle - The ping circle includes some new information. There is a 60+ minutes notification (or is it 60 miles?) in addition to the usual 45+ which is helpful, but the most helpful new addition is information about the location. If known, the ping circle will now present information like “Alhambra High School”, “John Muir Medical Center”, “Old Fuddy Duddy Retirement Home”, “Walmart 24th Street”, “Safeway Downtown”, “Honda Repair Shop”, etc. In all of these examples I’ve given, this is a new way that drivers can avoid these undesirable passenger pings, so I think this is not Lyft’s intended consequence, but it is a plus for drivers to have new clues about poor pickup locations to avoid.

Prime Time Percent - The prime time percentage is shown in a giant new banner in the middle of the screen, somewhat above the ping circle, which is enormously oversized in a showy lime green color. The presentation of the PT pct contrasts pretty horribly with the pink ping circle below it, which results in a confused muddle for drivers to synthesize quickly. This presentation breaks one of the cardinal rules of application design. The main goal of an application design is to get the user to quickly focus on the important information or action desired by the developer. The action desired is “hey, click this ping circle”, but it gets lost in the Christmas Tree effect of the rest of the screen. This mess of a presentation leads to a distracted driver, whose hesitation can even be dangerous on the road.

Long Trip Notifications - What’s actually good is that Lyft is finally presenting PT% on long-trip notifications. And as mentioned, there is now a 60+ notification. As I’ve seen no examples in two weeks, I still believe that Lyft is NOT showing long-trip notifications on Shared rides, which is another silly oversight.

Arrival - Lyft is now requiring drivers be very very close to the passenger before clicking "arrived". You can still do it at a normal place of approach, but it requires another level of clicks while driving which endangers the life of the driver while driving in busy streets. And if you do click "arrived" a block away, in addition to this new layer of spammy clicks Lyft requires, you will not be eligible for a cancellation fee. In addition to having more accidents, the consequence of this change is that drivers will now automatically cancel in gated communities where they cannot physically get close enough to the passengers location, and in busy areas like the financial district in San Francisco where you have to click "arrived" a stoplight beforehand to get the passenger out on the street looking for you where there is no parking. Which brings me to cancellation reasons........

Cancellation Reasons - I'm not going to opine about how long drivers should reallyyyy have to wait before canceling a trip (it's still five minutes), but when a trip does need to be canceled Lyft continues to endanger drivers. There is STILL no ability to cancel a ride for legitimate legal reasons. There needs to be a "missing baby seat" and "unaccompanied minor" category which does NOT count against a driver's cancellation rate. Because ALL canceled trips are counted against the driver, even when required by law, drivers will continue to sit in the proximity of the angry passenger for five minutes until she can cancel the ride for a cancellation fee. Some drivers won't wait that long and will cancel anyway, which Lyft counts against them and will use to deactivate them. By the way, this problem exposes Lyft to another future class action lawsuit that should worry investors, because ANYONE who has been deactivated from Lyft for high cancellations has a claim.

Scheduled rides - There is a disturbing new action on scheduled rides. When you go online now for a scheduled ride, you will get pings for other rides that are nearer you. Lyft should have learned long ago that their original implementation of scheduled rides was a disaster for PASSENGERS. They fixed scheduled rides over a year ago, so to bring back one of the truly awful mistakes in their original implementation of scheduled rides is absolutely appalling. On the flip side, if you ignore the unwanted pings my experience is that you will eventually get the ping for the ride you signed up for and the passenger will be happy that you chose them.

Destination filters - Still six uses, still 30 minutes each. They have changed how they work at airports now which I’ll explain if someone asks in the comments.

On/Off Toggle - The online/offline switch is still at the top of the screen away from all the other activities that drivers do between rides. This is a a good thing (still) and something that Uber should learn from.


All in all, this new Lyft update misses the mark. It does include some things drivers have been wanting for years, such as PT percentage on long rides, but some of the very basic design flaws that should have been fixed years ago are still present and they have gone backwards in a few areas.

Part 2 of this review will look under the hood at the administrative features of the new update.
Why would you hit arrival befor you got there and parked?
 

Dropking

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
Some of this is just your opinion I don’t agree with
Post automatically merged:


Why would you hit arrival befor you got there and parked?
Maybe because there is no parking or safe place to stop in a busy financial district, one of the most gridlocked cities in the country? Maybe because if the pax isnt on the curb ready to go, the situation is unsafe because 12 bicycles. 18 pedestrians, 3 box trucks, a mail truck and 24 unhappy cars are all around your vehicle laying on their horn?

You sound like an inexperienced driver in these conditions. Consider yourself lucky!
 

Uberfenix

Active Member
Some of this is just your opinion I don’t agree with
Post automatically merged:


Why would you hit arrival befor you got there and parked?
Because waiting time should be the time you spent to drive there or a 5 minutes max combination between arriving there and waiting, especially for short and non-prime time, let's say you're 10 minutes away, consider the last 2 minutes of that, waiting time plus 3 minutes after arrival, or even better, driver is 10 minutes away, consider the last 5 minutes the passenger's waiting time
 

The Gift of Fish

Well-Known Member
The crux of the problem is that between rides, drivers will be texting their spouses, answering emails, playing toon blast or chess, opening other apps, etc etc. Almost all of these activities involved touch typing on the keypad which is always located in the lower middle part of the device, or otherwise touching the area on the bottom half of the device. This means that when a ping eventually comes, there will be a huge number of false acceptances when drivers were trying to touch “send this email” but accidentally accepted the ping in the nanosecond that it appeared on top of the keypad.
This has got to be by design. Lyft knows that this happens, and then they use the strongarm tactic of threatening to fire drivers who cancel "too often", whatever that is. This is one of the reasons that I have a separate phone for Lyft. I put it in its mount at the beginning of the shift and I do not touch it except to interact with the Lyft app, or Google Maps during trips.
Post automatically merged:

post screen shots of your new app. i want to compare it with mine.
I'll show you mine if you show me yours.
Post automatically merged:

Some of this is just your opinion I don’t agree with
Agreed. Opinions are not allowed on this site - I am forming a squad of independent contractors to deal with him.
 
Last edited:

Tundi

New Member
Something that tripped me up lately is the personal power zone. It is only active for a limited time, but it appears long before it's active. So, I'm in the zone, get a ping and don't get the additional credit. Why? ping was 7 minutes before the zone was active. Had I known the zone was not active, I would not have been there.

Another thing - I come from the software testing world and where I worked, you ALWAYS got release notes which described the feature and how it is supposed to work. I have yet to see a release note from Lyft.
Why are you discussing this here?? Is there not a Lyft website for you guys?!
 

RideshareSpectrum

Well-Known Member
I’ll be enjoying the PT % on those long ride requests in these final days of non flat rate PT, even if I need to decline hundreds just to get one. In other words biz as usual.
 

Fozzie

Well-Known Member
Their biggest and most glaring app feature/discrepancy is the continued lack of a night mode. God I hate using Lyft in the morning when it's dark outside and the bright white and pink screen blinds you.

Their lack of native tablet support is also extremely irritating.

306916
 
Last edited:

Alantc

Active Member
This is a review of Lyft’s new app for android, just released at the end of February 2019. The review covers the pros, cons, and oversights of a significant new update. This will be a two part review, with this first part focusing on the ping and ride experience, with the second part focusing on administrative features.

As usual, I became part of a hidden beta test group for Lyft’s new app near the beginning of February. The original release which I did not ask for was very buggy which was unappreciated by me, but Lyft snuck out a final version of the release without telling members of the beta test group. Some of the bugs were glaring — the PT percentage was missing entirely — but when I noticed the new version in the Google Playstore, I downloaded it and some of those problems were fixed. What follows is a review of this final version.


The Ping - The ping circle itself is still presented in the lower middle part of the screen. This is the most glaring oversight in the new update which has inexplicably plagued Lyft for a long time. The crux of the problem is that between rides, drivers will be texting their spouses, answering emails, playing toon blast or chess, opening other apps, etc etc. Almost all of these activities involved touch typing on the keypad which is always located in the lower middle part of the device, or otherwise touching the area on the bottom half of the device. This means that when a ping eventually comes, there will be a huge number of false acceptances when drivers were trying to touch “send this email” but accidentally accepted the ping in the nanosecond that it appeared on top of the keypad. These false acceptances are almost always canceled by drivers, at least I suspect so because that is what I do in every case. Lyft should move that ping acceptance circle to the middle-top of the device, but after so long of a faulty design I now feel like a nagging spouse.

Meta information in the ping circle - The ping circle includes some new information. There is a 60+ minutes notification (or is it 60 miles?) in addition to the usual 45+ which is helpful, but the most helpful new addition is information about the location. If known, the ping circle will now present information like “Alhambra High School”, “John Muir Medical Center”, “Old Fuddy Duddy Retirement Home”, “Walmart 24th Street”, “Safeway Downtown”, “Honda Repair Shop”, etc. In all of these examples I’ve given, this is a new way that drivers can avoid these undesirable passenger pings, so I think this is not Lyft’s intended consequence, but it is a plus for drivers to have new clues about poor pickup locations to avoid.

Prime Time Percent - The prime time percentage is shown in a giant new banner in the middle of the screen, somewhat above the ping circle, which is enormously oversized in a showy lime green color. The presentation of the PT pct contrasts pretty horribly with the pink ping circle below it, which results in a confused muddle for drivers to synthesize quickly. This presentation breaks one of the cardinal rules of application design. The main goal of an application design is to get the user to quickly focus on the important information or action desired by the developer. The action desired is “hey, click this ping circle”, but it gets lost in the Christmas Tree effect of the rest of the screen. This mess of a presentation leads to a distracted driver, whose hesitation can even be dangerous on the road.

Long Trip Notifications - What’s actually good is that Lyft is finally presenting PT% on long-trip notifications. And as mentioned, there is now a 60+ notification. As I’ve seen no examples in two weeks, I still believe that Lyft is NOT showing long-trip notifications on Shared rides, which is another silly oversight.

Arrival - Lyft is now requiring drivers be very very close to the passenger before clicking "arrived". You can still do it at a normal place of approach, but it requires another level of clicks while driving which endangers the life of the driver while driving in busy streets. And if you do click "arrived" a block away, in addition to this new layer of spammy clicks Lyft requires, you will not be eligible for a cancellation fee. In addition to having more accidents, the consequence of this change is that drivers will now automatically cancel in gated communities where they cannot physically get close enough to the passengers location, and in busy areas like the financial district in San Francisco where you have to click "arrived" a stoplight beforehand to get the passenger out on the street looking for you where there is no parking. Which brings me to cancellation reasons........

Cancellation Reasons - I'm not going to opine about how long drivers should reallyyyy have to wait before canceling a trip (it's still five minutes), but when a trip does need to be canceled Lyft continues to endanger drivers. There is STILL no ability to cancel a ride for legitimate legal reasons. There needs to be a "missing baby seat" and "unaccompanied minor" category which does NOT count against a driver's cancellation rate. Because ALL canceled trips are counted against the driver, even when required by law, drivers will continue to sit in the proximity of the angry passenger for five minutes until she can cancel the ride for a cancellation fee. Some drivers won't wait that long and will cancel anyway, which Lyft counts against them and will use to deactivate them. By the way, this problem exposes Lyft to another future class action lawsuit that should worry investors, because ANYONE who has been deactivated from Lyft for high cancellations has a claim.

Scheduled rides - There is a disturbing new action on scheduled rides. When you go online now for a scheduled ride, you will get pings for other rides that are nearer you. Lyft should have learned long ago that their original implementation of scheduled rides was a disaster for PASSENGERS. They fixed scheduled rides over a year ago, so to bring back one of the truly awful mistakes in their original implementation of scheduled rides is absolutely appalling. On the flip side, if you ignore the unwanted pings my experience is that you will eventually get the ping for the ride you signed up for and the passenger will be happy that you chose them.

Destination filters - Still six uses, still 30 minutes each. They have changed how they work at airports now which I’ll explain if someone asks in the comments.

On/Off Toggle - The online/offline switch is still at the top of the screen away from all the other activities that drivers do between rides. This is a a good thing (still) and something that Uber should learn from.


All in all, this new Lyft update misses the mark. It does include some things drivers have been wanting for years, such as PT percentage on long rides, but some of the very basic design flaws that should have been fixed years ago are still present and they have gone backwards in a few areas.

Part 2 of this review will look under the hood at the administrative features of the new update.
u dont hear the ping wright away, no night mode ,addresses aren't shown fully, no long notification pric pickup or long trip drop off.
 

hecubus

New Member
Anyone else setting their DF for West and then getting trips that go the exact opposite direction, East? Seems like the Lyft DF is not even respected when it is set? Either that or it's just Artificial Idiocy. Quite frustrating to the point where I just don't Lyft at all.
 

Tom Oldman

Active Member
This is a review of Lyft’s new app for android, just released at the end of February 2019. The review covers the pros, cons, and oversights of a significant new update. This will be a two part review, with this first part focusing on the ping and ride experience, with the second part focusing on administrative features.

As usual, I became part of a hidden beta test group for Lyft’s new app near the beginning of February. The original release which I did not ask for was very buggy which was unappreciated by me, but Lyft snuck out a final version of the release without telling members of the beta test group. Some of the bugs were glaring — the PT percentage was missing entirely — but when I noticed the new version in the Google Playstore, I downloaded it and some of those problems were fixed. What follows is a review of this final version.


The Ping - The ping circle itself is still presented in the lower middle part of the screen. This is the most glaring oversight in the new update which has inexplicably plagued Lyft for a long time. The crux of the problem is that between rides, drivers will be texting their spouses, answering emails, playing toon blast or chess, opening other apps, etc etc. Almost all of these activities involved touch typing on the keypad which is always located in the lower middle part of the device, or otherwise touching the area on the bottom half of the device. This means that when a ping eventually comes, there will be a huge number of false acceptances when drivers were trying to touch “send this email” but accidentally accepted the ping in the nanosecond that it appeared on top of the keypad. These false acceptances are almost always canceled by drivers, at least I suspect so because that is what I do in every case. Lyft should move that ping acceptance circle to the middle-top of the device, but after so long of a faulty design I now feel like a nagging spouse.

Meta information in the ping circle - The ping circle includes some new information. There is a 60+ minutes notification (or is it 60 miles?) in addition to the usual 45+ which is helpful, but the most helpful new addition is information about the location. If known, the ping circle will now present information like “Alhambra High School”, “John Muir Medical Center”, “Old Fuddy Duddy Retirement Home”, “Walmart 24th Street”, “Safeway Downtown”, “Honda Repair Shop”, etc. In all of these examples I’ve given, this is a new way that drivers can avoid these undesirable passenger pings, so I think this is not Lyft’s intended consequence, but it is a plus for drivers to have new clues about poor pickup locations to avoid.

Prime Time Percent - The prime time percentage is shown in a giant new banner in the middle of the screen, somewhat above the ping circle, which is enormously oversized in a showy lime green color. The presentation of the PT pct contrasts pretty horribly with the pink ping circle below it, which results in a confused muddle for drivers to synthesize quickly. This presentation breaks one of the cardinal rules of application design. The main goal of an application design is to get the user to quickly focus on the important information or action desired by the developer. The action desired is “hey, click this ping circle”, but it gets lost in the Christmas Tree effect of the rest of the screen. This mess of a presentation leads to a distracted driver, whose hesitation can even be dangerous on the road.

Long Trip Notifications - What’s actually good is that Lyft is finally presenting PT% on long-trip notifications. And as mentioned, there is now a 60+ notification. As I’ve seen no examples in two weeks, I still believe that Lyft is NOT showing long-trip notifications on Shared rides, which is another silly oversight.

Arrival - Lyft is now requiring drivers be very very close to the passenger before clicking "arrived". You can still do it at a normal place of approach, but it requires another level of clicks while driving which endangers the life of the driver while driving in busy streets. And if you do click "arrived" a block away, in addition to this new layer of spammy clicks Lyft requires, you will not be eligible for a cancellation fee. In addition to having more accidents, the consequence of this change is that drivers will now automatically cancel in gated communities where they cannot physically get close enough to the passengers location, and in busy areas like the financial district in San Francisco where you have to click "arrived" a stoplight beforehand to get the passenger out on the street looking for you where there is no parking. Which brings me to cancellation reasons........

Cancellation Reasons - I'm not going to opine about how long drivers should reallyyyy have to wait before canceling a trip (it's still five minutes), but when a trip does need to be canceled Lyft continues to endanger drivers. There is STILL no ability to cancel a ride for legitimate legal reasons. There needs to be a "missing baby seat" and "unaccompanied minor" category which does NOT count against a driver's cancellation rate. Because ALL canceled trips are counted against the driver, even when required by law, drivers will continue to sit in the proximity of the angry passenger for five minutes until she can cancel the ride for a cancellation fee. Some drivers won't wait that long and will cancel anyway, which Lyft counts against them and will use to deactivate them. By the way, this problem exposes Lyft to another future class action lawsuit that should worry investors, because ANYONE who has been deactivated from Lyft for high cancellations has a claim.

Scheduled rides - There is a disturbing new action on scheduled rides. When you go online now for a scheduled ride, you will get pings for other rides that are nearer you. Lyft should have learned long ago that their original implementation of scheduled rides was a disaster for PASSENGERS. They fixed scheduled rides over a year ago, so to bring back one of the truly awful mistakes in their original implementation of scheduled rides is absolutely appalling. On the flip side, if you ignore the unwanted pings my experience is that you will eventually get the ping for the ride you signed up for and the passenger will be happy that you chose them.

Destination filters - Still six uses, still 30 minutes each. They have changed how they work at airports now which I’ll explain if someone asks in the comments.

On/Off Toggle - The online/offline switch is still at the top of the screen away from all the other activities that drivers do between rides. This is a a good thing (still) and something that Uber should learn from.


All in all, this new Lyft update misses the mark. It does include some things drivers have been wanting for years, such as PT percentage on long rides, but some of the very basic design flaws that should have been fixed years ago are still present and they have gone backwards in a few areas.

Part 2 of this review will look under the hood at the administrative features of the new update.
Thank you for taking the time and posting this very important and useful report.

I drive mostly Uber but lately I have been driving Lyft more than usual due to Uber's unfair practices. I noticed changes after recent updates with Lyft app and your report answers many questions I had.
 

JaredJ

Well-Known Member
I absolutely hate Lyft's policy on rematching with closer pickups. Nearly every time, I end up matched with a bottom feeding rider.

It's so bad that unless it's a Destination Filter ride (which won't rematch), I'll accept Uber pickups instead of Lyft. For Ubers faults, I find their driver app to be more reliable and easier to use.
 
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