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Lyft facing federal lawsuit over pay

BurgerTiime

Well-Known Member
FEDERAL LAWSUIT: LYFT DRIVERS BEING UNDERPAID BY COMPANY

http://www.wthitv.com/content/national/474611893.html?ref=893

Some drivers for a ride-sharing company say they're being ripped off. Now there's a federal lawsuit filed against Lyft. The I-Team looked into whether the company is being upfront about what it's charging riders.

Mike Walker just started driving for Lyft. One of his part-time jobs to help make ends meet. The week we rode with him, Mike was able to bring in $750 picking up customers for both Uber and Lyft.

We drove about 13 miles with Mike. In his car for 40 minutes, the ride cost us $25.71. The fare Lyft reported to Mike was $23.96. "That's deceptive," he told us. "I didn't know that you were paying more. I've never really had a situation where I could see the other side of the transaction."

Mike's Lyft fees were taken out of the lower fare. "So there's like 10% missing between what you're seeing and what I'm seeing," Mike said.

A class action lawsuit, filed in federal court against Lyft, accuses the company of deceiving drivers and underpaying them. Attorney Steve Mashel told us, "they've been deprived the full value of the contract that they entered into with Lyft." Mashel represents a New Jersey Lyft driver in this case. He claims the company continues to breach the "Terms of Service" drivers sign. "What the rider is quoted should be the basis off of which the fare to the driver should be calculated."

In the lawsuit Mashel alleges Lyft is hiding the fare discrepancy. He believes it should be clearly disclosed in its contracts. "This is after ride, after ride, after ride, it mounts up." On all our rides there was a difference in the fare Lyft charged us and what the company showed the driver we paid. One driver did the math and told us, "I guess after 250 rides if they did a dollar, that's $250 they got me for."

Mike wants Lyft to be up front about the difference in fares, for both drivers and riders. "For something like this to just be flying under the radar and nobody knows about it? It's wrong. Just totally wrong."

Mashel told us drivers across the country have sent him examples of fare discrepancies ranging from 15 cents to as much as $8 a ride.

Lyft has filed a motion to dismiss the lawsuit. A spokesperson wouldn't comment directly on pending litigation but did tell us passenger pricing and driver pay are based on different factors. When Lyft quotes a price in advance to the passenger it uses estimated time and distance. Driver fare, is based on actual time and distance at the end of the ride.

Mashel wants to hear from drivers who believe they've been underpaid.
 

heynow321

Well-Known Member
what do people not understand about the upfront pricing scam? jesus it's all public and has been reported on since it first started. what YOU'RE paid has NOTHING to do with what the passenger was charged. it's just not that difficult...
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
FEDERAL LAWSUIT: LYFT DRIVERS BEING UNDERPAID BY COMPANY

http://www.wthitv.com/content/national/474611893.html?ref=893

Some drivers for a ride-sharing company say they're being ripped off. Now there's a federal lawsuit filed against Lyft. The I-Team looked into whether the company is being upfront about what it's charging riders.

Mike Walker just started driving for Lyft. One of his part-time jobs to help make ends meet. The week we rode with him, Mike was able to bring in $750 picking up customers for both Uber and Lyft.

We drove about 13 miles with Mike. In his car for 40 minutes, the ride cost us $25.71. The fare Lyft reported to Mike was $23.96. "That's deceptive," he told us. "I didn't know that you were paying more. I've never really had a situation where I could see the other side of the transaction."

Mike's Lyft fees were taken out of the lower fare. "So there's like 10% missing between what you're seeing and what I'm seeing," Mike said.

A class action lawsuit, filed in federal court against Lyft, accuses the company of deceiving drivers and underpaying them. Attorney Steve Mashel told us, "they've been deprived the full value of the contract that they entered into with Lyft." Mashel represents a New Jersey Lyft driver in this case. He claims the company continues to breach the "Terms of Service" drivers sign. "What the rider is quoted should be the basis off of which the fare to the driver should be calculated."

In the lawsuit Mashel alleges Lyft is hiding the fare discrepancy. He believes it should be clearly disclosed in its contracts. "This is after ride, after ride, after ride, it mounts up." On all our rides there was a difference in the fare Lyft charged us and what the company showed the driver we paid. One driver did the math and told us, "I guess after 250 rides if they did a dollar, that's $250 they got me for."

Mike wants Lyft to be up front about the difference in fares, for both drivers and riders. "For something like this to just be flying under the radar and nobody knows about it? It's wrong. Just totally wrong."

Mashel told us drivers across the country have sent him examples of fare discrepancies ranging from 15 cents to as much as $8 a ride.

Lyft has filed a motion to dismiss the lawsuit. A spokesperson wouldn't comment directly on pending litigation but did tell us passenger pricing and driver pay are based on different factors. When Lyft quotes a price in advance to the passenger it uses estimated time and distance. Driver fare, is based on actual time and distance at the end of the ride.

Mashel wants to hear from drivers who believe they've been underpaid.
Piles of BACK PAY AWAIT !
 

Trump Economics

Well-Known Member
Lyft’s Arbitrarion Agreement prevents either party (passenger or driver) from class-action status. The attorney in this case knows that, which means they’re probably looking for a quick settlement — something Lyft will do in order to prevent each case from being tried individually by an arbiter. The attorney will threaten to do this after the original claim is thrown out.

Let’s just call it “another day at the office.”
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
$35,000,000 settlement

Or $35 per driver per year they worked for lyft.
" MAKE IT RAIN "!

Lyft’s Arbitrarion Agreement prevents either party (passenger or driver) from class-action status. The attorney in this case knows that, which means they’re probably looking for a quick settlement — something Lyft will do in order to prevent each case from being tried individually by an arbiter. The attorney will threaten to do this after the original claim is thrown out.

Let’s just call it “another day at the office.”
Thats like a Vampire hiding behind Relegion.

A Judge can overturn an unjust clause.
 

Attachments

Oscar Levant

Well-Known Member
FEDERAL LAWSUIT: LYFT DRIVERS BEING UNDERPAID BY COMPANY

http://www.wthitv.com/content/national/474611893.html?ref=893

Some drivers for a ride-sharing company say they're being ripped off. Now there's a federal lawsuit filed against Lyft. The I-Team looked into whether the company is being upfront about what it's charging riders.

Mike Walker just started driving for Lyft. One of his part-time jobs to help make ends meet. The week we rode with him, Mike was able to bring in $750 picking up customers for both Uber and Lyft.

We drove about 13 miles with Mike. In his car for 40 minutes, the ride cost us $25.71. The fare Lyft reported to Mike was $23.96. "That's deceptive," he told us. "I didn't know that you were paying more. I've never really had a situation where I could see the other side of the transaction."

Mike's Lyft fees were taken out of the lower fare. "So there's like 10% missing between what you're seeing and what I'm seeing," Mike said.

A class action lawsuit, filed in federal court against Lyft, accuses the company of deceiving drivers and underpaying them. Attorney Steve Mashel told us, "they've been deprived the full value of the contract that they entered into with Lyft." Mashel represents a New Jersey Lyft driver in this case. He claims the company continues to breach the "Terms of Service" drivers sign. "What the rider is quoted should be the basis off of which the fare to the driver should be calculated."

In the lawsuit Mashel alleges Lyft is hiding the fare discrepancy. He believes it should be clearly disclosed in its contracts. "This is after ride, after ride, after ride, it mounts up." On all our rides there was a difference in the fare Lyft charged us and what the company showed the driver we paid. One driver did the math and told us, "I guess after 250 rides if they did a dollar, that's $250 they got me for."

Mike wants Lyft to be up front about the difference in fares, for both drivers and riders. "For something like this to just be flying under the radar and nobody knows about it? It's wrong. Just totally wrong."

Mashel told us drivers across the country have sent him examples of fare discrepancies ranging from 15 cents to as much as $8 a ride.

Lyft has filed a motion to dismiss the lawsuit. A spokesperson wouldn't comment directly on pending litigation but did tell us passenger pricing and driver pay are based on different factors. When Lyft quotes a price in advance to the passenger it uses estimated time and distance. Driver fare, is based on actual time and distance at the end of the ride.

Mashel wants to hear from drivers who believe they've been underpaid.

I believe Uber is doing the same thing, charging riders more than the are telling drivers they are being charged.

Lyft’s Arbitrarion Agreement prevents either party (passenger or driver) from class-action status. The attorney in this case knows that, which means they’re probably looking for a quick settlement — something Lyft will do in order to prevent each case from being tried individually by an arbiter. The attorney will threaten to do this after the original claim is thrown out.

Let’s just call it “another day at the office.”
Could they rule that the arbitration you signed, ( sign or no rides ) isn't valid?

In my view, if you don't sign or no rides, that shouldn't be a valid agreement.
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
I believe Uber is doing the same thing, charging riders more than the are telling drivers they are being charged.



Could they rule that the arbitration you signed, ( sign or no rides ) isn't valid?

In my view, if you don't sign or no rides, that shouldn't be a valid agreement.
I agree
Coercion and uber Extortion isnt a Proper Contract.
 

Mole

Well-Known Member
Do you know almost 50% of passengers get charged a long pick up fee even in the cities and they only give the driver a long pick up fee 10% of the time it is also how they controll the surge they charge you a $9 pick up fee give the driver$1 so basically it is surge up front pricing with out giving the driver the surge.
 

Leo1983

Well-Known Member
what do people not understand about the upfront pricing scam? jesus it's all public and has been reported on since it first started. what YOU'RE paid has NOTHING to do with what the passenger was charged. it's just not that difficult...
But highly illegal.
 

Oscar Levant

Well-Known Member
FEDERAL LAWSUIT: LYFT DRIVERS BEING UNDERPAID BY COMPANY

http://www.wthitv.com/content/national/474611893.html?ref=893

Some drivers for a ride-sharing company say they're being ripped off. Now there's a federal lawsuit filed against Lyft. The I-Team looked into whether the company is being upfront about what it's charging riders.

Mike Walker just started driving for Lyft. One of his part-time jobs to help make ends meet. The week we rode with him, Mike was able to bring in $750 picking up customers for both Uber and Lyft.

We drove about 13 miles with Mike. In his car for 40 minutes, the ride cost us $25.71. The fare Lyft reported to Mike was $23.96. "That's deceptive," he told us. "I didn't know that you were paying more. I've never really had a situation where I could see the other side of the transaction."

Mike's Lyft fees were taken out of the lower fare. "So there's like 10% missing between what you're seeing and what I'm seeing," Mike said.

A class action lawsuit, filed in federal court against Lyft, accuses the company of deceiving drivers and underpaying them. Attorney Steve Mashel told us, "they've been deprived the full value of the contract that they entered into with Lyft." Mashel represents a New Jersey Lyft driver in this case. He claims the company continues to breach the "Terms of Service" drivers sign. "What the rider is quoted should be the basis off of which the fare to the driver should be calculated."

In the lawsuit Mashel alleges Lyft is hiding the fare discrepancy. He believes it should be clearly disclosed in its contracts. "This is after ride, after ride, after ride, it mounts up." On all our rides there was a difference in the fare Lyft charged us and what the company showed the driver we paid. One driver did the math and told us, "I guess after 250 rides if they did a dollar, that's $250 they got me for."

Mike wants Lyft to be up front about the difference in fares, for both drivers and riders. "For something like this to just be flying under the radar and nobody knows about it? It's wrong. Just totally wrong."

Mashel told us drivers across the country have sent him examples of fare discrepancies ranging from 15 cents to as much as $8 a ride.

Lyft has filed a motion to dismiss the lawsuit. A spokesperson wouldn't comment directly on pending litigation but did tell us passenger pricing and driver pay are based on different factors. When Lyft quotes a price in advance to the passenger it uses estimated time and distance. Driver fare, is based on actual time and distance at the end of the ride.

Mashel wants to hear from drivers who believe they've been underpaid.
]
What Uber did was it quit asserting drivers were getting a % of the total fair. I'm surprised Lyft didn't follow suit.
 

Jesusdrivesuber

Well-Known Member
Mashel told us drivers across the country have sent him examples of fare discrepancies ranging from 15 cents to as much as $8 a ride
Did they get a copy of Uber's $100 dollar plus discrepancies yet? Because that's just pebbles in comparison.

Has Uber lost this lawsuit yet?
 

dkhoser

Member
No it’s not
yes it is & if you dont think on top of all the things theyve already been found guilty of & still doing that they're not skimming off millions a rides a day a mile here, a minute there, short a toll like an old vegas casino you on the payroll or extremely naive & delusional

these "people" actually pay human adults in 2018 $2 after gas for minimum trips & 1965-1985 cab rates

they call .01 or A PENNY "premium" lmao foh

thats also illegal but its an app so i guess thats the loophole
 

SEAL Team 5

Well-Known Member
seal team and mista making an appearance in this thread defending Lyft and Uber in 3, 2, 1 ........
Crap, I'm 36 days too late. I was too busy making a killing in Phx/Scottsdale this past month with Spring Training baseball, concerts, tourists and a sunny 75 degree forecast everyday. And I don't defend Uber/Lyft in these situations. I belittle the ignorance of the driver for not knowing what they agreed to with Uber/Lyft.
 
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