Keeping track of total hours worked with uber and lyft?

Jst1dreamr

Well-Known Member
What law are you talking about? DOT regulations? They only cover CDLs, not rideshare, and taxis are locally regulated.
You are way too stuck on small details. Do you think anyone cares weather the law is federal, state or local when paying the fine for their ticket?
You are very stuck on criticizing everything, I bet you have no friends that want you around.

State and Municipality Restrictions

The following states and municipalities have adopted hour restrictions on rideshare drivers:

  • Austin - Drivers may not operate a Transportation Network Company (TNC) vehicle for more than 12 hours within a 24 hour period.
  • Colorado - After operating a TNC vehicle for 12 hours, drivers must take an eight hour break. Drivers may not operate a TNC vehicle for more than 16 hours within a 24-hour period and 70 hours within a seven-day period.
  • Washington, D.C. - No more than 13 hours within a 24 hour period.
  • Illinois (Chicago and Rockford only) - No more than 10 hours within a 24 hour period.
  • Kentucky - After operating a TNC vehicle for 12 consecutive hours, drivers must take an 8-hour break. After operating a TNC vehicle for 16 hours spread over a 24-hour period, drivers must take a 10 hour break.
  • Maryland - No more than 13 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Nebraska - No more than 12 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Nevada - Drivers may not operate a TNC vehicle for more than 16 hours within a 24-hour period, and may not transport passengers for more than 12 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • New York City - No more than 12 hours within a 24 hour period
  • Orlando - No more than 12 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Portland - No more than 14 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Virginia - No more than 13 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Seattle/King County, Washington - After either 12 hours spread over a 15-hour period, or 12 consecutive hours in a 24-hour period, drivers must take a 10-hour break.
 

FLKeys

Well-Known Member
You are way too stuck on small details. Do you think anyone cares weather the law is federal, state or local when paying the fine for their ticket?
You are very stuck on criticizing everything, I bet you have no friends that want you around.

State and Municipality Restrictions

The following states and municipalities have adopted hour restrictions on rideshare drivers:

  • Austin - Drivers may not operate a Transportation Network Company (TNC) vehicle for more than 12 hours within a 24 hour period.
  • Colorado - After operating a TNC vehicle for 12 hours, drivers must take an eight hour break. Drivers may not operate a TNC vehicle for more than 16 hours within a 24-hour period and 70 hours within a seven-day period.
  • Washington, D.C. - No more than 13 hours within a 24 hour period.
  • Illinois (Chicago and Rockford only) - No more than 10 hours within a 24 hour period.
  • Kentucky - After operating a TNC vehicle for 12 consecutive hours, drivers must take an 8-hour break. After operating a TNC vehicle for 16 hours spread over a 24-hour period, drivers must take a 10 hour break.
  • Maryland - No more than 13 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Nebraska - No more than 12 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Nevada - Drivers may not operate a TNC vehicle for more than 16 hours within a 24-hour period, and may not transport passengers for more than 12 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • New York City - No more than 12 hours within a 24 hour period
  • Orlando - No more than 12 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Portland - No more than 14 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Virginia - No more than 13 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Seattle/King County, Washington - After either 12 hours spread over a 15-hour period, or 12 consecutive hours in a 24-hour period, drivers must take a 10-hour break.

I see Orlando in your list, where did this come from. Florida has set TNC rules and preempted any community from making stronger rules.
 

Jst1dreamr

Well-Known Member
I see Orlando in your list, where did this come from. Florida has set TNC rules and preempted any community from making stronger rules.
It was dated May 2017. I know it has changed because California also has added restrictions.
 

SuzeCB

Well-Known Member
You are way too stuck on small details. Do you think anyone cares weather the law is federal, state or local when paying the fine for their ticket?
You are very stuck on criticizing everything, I bet you have no friends that want you around.

State and Municipality Restrictions

The following states and municipalities have adopted hour restrictions on rideshare drivers:

  • Austin - Drivers may not operate a Transportation Network Company (TNC) vehicle for more than 12 hours within a 24 hour period.
  • Colorado - After operating a TNC vehicle for 12 hours, drivers must take an eight hour break. Drivers may not operate a TNC vehicle for more than 16 hours within a 24-hour period and 70 hours within a seven-day period.
  • Washington, D.C. - No more than 13 hours within a 24 hour period.
  • Illinois (Chicago and Rockford only) - No more than 10 hours within a 24 hour period.
  • Kentucky - After operating a TNC vehicle for 12 consecutive hours, drivers must take an 8-hour break. After operating a TNC vehicle for 16 hours spread over a 24-hour period, drivers must take a 10 hour break.
  • Maryland - No more than 13 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Nebraska - No more than 12 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Nevada - Drivers may not operate a TNC vehicle for more than 16 hours within a 24-hour period, and may not transport passengers for more than 12 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • New York City - No more than 12 hours within a 24 hour period
  • Orlando - No more than 12 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Portland - No more than 14 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Virginia - No more than 13 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Seattle/King County, Washington - After either 12 hours spread over a 15-hour period, or 12 consecutive hours in a 24-hour period, drivers must take a 10-hour break.
I didn't criticize, I asked a question. That's all. I'm not in any of those areas that you mentioned. I am in New Jersey.New Jersey does have laws for TNC drivers, but nothing limiting the time. The only other place that I had ever heard that limits the time for taxi drivers and/or TNC drivers is New York City.

Thank you for giving me the information.
 

Daisey77

Well-Known Member
You are way too stuck on small details. Do you think anyone cares weather the law is federal, state or local when paying the fine for their ticket?
You are very stuck on criticizing everything, I bet you have no friends that want you around.

State and Municipality Restrictions

The following states and municipalities have adopted hour restrictions on rideshare drivers:

  • Austin - Drivers may not operate a Transportation Network Company (TNC) vehicle for more than 12 hours within a 24 hour period.
  • Colorado - After operating a TNC vehicle for 12 hours, drivers must take an eight hour break. Drivers may not operate a TNC vehicle for more than 16 hours within a 24-hour period and 70 hours within a seven-day period.
  • Washington, D.C. - No more than 13 hours within a 24 hour period.
  • Illinois (Chicago and Rockford only) - No more than 10 hours within a 24 hour period.
  • Kentucky - After operating a TNC vehicle for 12 consecutive hours, drivers must takefollowing

  • r break. After operating a TNC vehicle for 16 hours spread over a 24-hour period, drivers must take a 10 hour break.
  • Maryland - No more than 13 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Nebraska - No more than 12 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Nevada - Drivers may not operate a TNC vehicle for more than 16 hours within a 24-hour period, and may not transport passengers for more than 12 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • New York City - No more than 12 hours within a 24 hour period
  • Orlando - No more than 12 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Portland - No more than 14 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Virginia - No more than 13 hours within a 24-hour period.
  • Seattle/King County, Washington - After either 12 hours spread over a 15-hour period, or 12 consecutive hours in a 24-hour period, drivers must take a 10-hour break.
This must be Uber's policies. The Colorado Public Utilities Commission regulates based off the following

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