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I've just been accepting every request.

Mista T

Well-Known Member
Author
On Lyft, if you are a platinum driver, and if they have no other messages to tell you, then you get the over estimated destination drive time. True drive time is often 25% less than stated, and true pickup time is often 25% more than stated.
 

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steveK2016

Well-Known Member
On Lyft, if you are a platinum driver, and if they have no other messages to tell you, then you get the over estimated destination drive time. True drive time is often 25% less than stated, and true pickup time is often 25% more than stated.
My lyft app shows me the destination once im at the pick up waiting for pax. It determines whether I'll actually make an effort to pick them up or not. If it's a long airport run, I'll call within 1-2min to remind them ive arrived. If its a quick trip, I call at 4:55 and no show cancel.
 

Mista T

Well-Known Member
Author
My lyft app shows me the destination once im at the pick up waiting for pax. It determines whether I'll actually make an effort to pick them up or not. If it's a long airport run, I'll call within 1-2min to remind them ive arrived. If its a quick trip, I call at 4:55 and no show cancel.
Yes that is a nice feature with Lyft also, available for every driver. Once you hit Arrive, you can see where the exact destination(s) are. Then it becomes easier to decide how much effort to put into making the ride actually happen.

If Uber would do the above 2 things, and Lyft would offer stacked rides instead of forcing them, as well as showing the pax rating and surge on stacked rides, then the two companies would be almost identical.
 

105398

Well-Known Member
There are some here who will tell you that they only accept the good rides so as to increase profit. Ask them how they identify the "good rides" and you get no answer.
I've answered this: It's a matter of knowing your city, and more specifically the area you stage in VERY well. Most people advise not to accept from grocery stores, big box stores, schools, etc. which is smart, but also knowing block to block whether it's a hotel, condo, or office building - versus a Burger King or some "mart" means you're more likely to get businesspeople, tourists, and professionals. At least what I prefer.

This combined with the times you work (if looking for airport rides) gives a high chance of "good" rides. For me it's just playing the probability. They won't all be great, but the majority will be profitable, and lessens the "not so profitable" rides.

I would never accept every request, and turn many down based on location, distance, and rating. I do far less rides than most, but the rides I do I enjoy and make money.
 

Fuzzyelvis

Well-Known Member
There are some here who will tell you that they only accept the good rides so as to increase profit. Ask them how they identify the "good rides" and you get no answer.
Not true. A hotel at 4am is likely the airport. Kroger store at 7 pm is likely not.

As an example, I often used to get airport trips from certain clinics in the TX med center. My schedule, plus the fact it doesn't surge much, means I don't now. But I used to by knowing what days certain buildings had clinics and when those patients would generally leave. If they were short trips it was usually to a hotel close by, and I could still catch a long trip afterwards. Not every time, but fairly consistently.

Its not exact, but you just have to increase your chances.
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
I've answered this: It's a matter of knowing your city, and more specifically the area you stage in VERY well. Most people advise not to accept from grocery stores, big box stores, schools, etc. which is smart, but also knowing block to block whether it's a hotel, condo, or office building - versus a Burger King or some "mart" means you're more likely to get businesspeople, tourists, and professionals. At least what I prefer.

This combined with the times you work (if looking for airport rides) gives a high chance of "good" rides. For me it's just playing the probability. They won't all be great, but the majority will be profitable, and lessens the "not so profitable" rides.

I would never accept every request, and turn many down based on location, distance, and rating. I do far less rides than most, but the rides I do I enjoy and make money.
^^^ he knows.

I have plane schedules.
Bus schedules( greyhound)
Train schedules ( Amtrack)
I have the monthly cruise ship schedule for the year downloaded onto my phone.

I know the hotels.
Air BNB's.
I have a list of conventions.
I question convention riders.
Know who is attending for duration, who is leaving early.

I know Events.
Festivals
Concerts
Games.

Uber gathers information.

I do too.

Gather Intelligence my friend.

Become RideShare CIA

Bonus Hint : watch weather Reports.
People dont enjoy waiting for busses & street cars in the rain.
 

CJfrom619

Well-Known Member
There are some here who will tell you that they only accept the good rides so as to increase profit. Ask them how they identify the "good rides" and you get no answer.
Drivers don’t know where the destination is going but good drivers will take requests that give them a much higher percentage for a good ride. For example in my city a store, trolley, school, bar and pickups like this will most likely lead to a minimum fare. On there other hand pickups from residential, business, hotel and airport pickups gives you a much better percentage for longer trips. I typically only accept 20-40% of my requests because I’m trying to pick out the good requests. There’s always a bit of luck factor when it comes to good rides but if you take the good requests you will have a lot more good days then bad.

86F4B368-E4FE-4280-989E-5D0FD9B18CBE.png
F4616D61-8FDC-4AD9-96AE-600135147AED.png
View attachment 242725 Here’s a couple sc from the last time I drove on Sunday to give you an example of what I mean by getting solid rides/requests. You will notice I don’t have many minimum fares in there.
 

merryon2nd

Well-Known Member
Welcome to the Uber lottery system, where everything is randomized out of a hat and only those with common sense manage to make enough to survive. You'll learn where the big runners come from over time. Until you learn the patterns, events, airlines and trains, you'll end up picking up a lot of garbage till you see the pattern emerge. Some pick it up fast. Others still don't get it.
All I can do is wish you luck.
Your market has an ebb and flow. Figure it out.
 

105398

Well-Known Member
I wait from pings from home or office, both areas fortunately have decent demand, and will work downtown during peak busy periods (but not so busy traffic is clogged)

From these two areas I know what's on every corner, and have got a few regulars as well. There's a fast food place nearby where the manager often orders rides for his crew. Nice enough but short rides and they smell like hamburgers.

In the same area there are three corporate hotels and dozens of office buildings which I know are almost always afternoon airport rides (of course slow during holidays though) Point is I know which to accept and which to let someone else get.
 

TDR

Well-Known Member
I've answered this: It's a matter of knowing your city, and more specifically the area you stage in VERY well. Most people advise not to accept from grocery stores, big box stores, schools, etc. which is smart, but also knowing block to block whether it's a hotel, condo, or office building - versus a Burger King or some "mart" means you're more likely to get businesspeople, tourists, and professionals. At least what I prefer.

This combined with the times you work (if looking for airport rides) gives a high chance of "good" rides. For me it's just playing the probability. They won't all be great, but the majority will be profitable, and lessens the "not so profitable" rides.

I would never accept every request, and turn many down based on location, distance, and rating. I do far less rides than most, but the rides I do I enjoy and make money.
Prophet with no profit. It’s impossible. Same way as you can’t win lottery. Prediction is behind human ability. Nothing and nothing will help to know ride destination before accepting. That only saying and ....

I wait from pings from home or office, both areas fortunately have decent demand, and will work downtown during peak busy periods (but not so busy traffic is clogged)

From these two areas I know what's on every corner, and have got a few regulars as well. There's a fast food place nearby where the manager often orders rides for his crew. Nice enough but short rides and they smell like hamburgers.

In the same area there are three corporate hotels and dozens of office buildings which I know are almost always afternoon airport rides (of course slow during holidays though) Point is I know which to accept and which to let someone else get.
Nice explanation mr. Prophet!!!!
 
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vtcomics

Well-Known Member
I realize I'm a clueless noob with only 100 rides....but I'm confused when I read posts that state, "I only accept 30% of my requests ". How do you not get deactivated for such a poor acceptance rate??? I thought Uber and Lyft monitored acceptance rates rigorously? Or am I missing something? (Quite probable!)
 

merryon2nd

Well-Known Member
I realize I'm a clueless noob with only 100 rides....but I'm confused when I read posts that state, "I only accept 30% of my requests ". How do you not get deactivated for such a poor acceptance rate??? I thought Uber and Lyft monitored acceptance rates rigorously? Or am I missing something? (Quite probable!)
Simple. As independent contractors, every call that comes through can be considered a bid. Like other independent contractors, we're not under obligation to accept every bid that comes to the table. They can whine about it, but, ultimately, they can't touch us more than a passive aggressive email or text about acceptance rate.
My own acceptance rate when driving in Philly has hit single digits at times.
 

vtcomics

Well-Known Member
Simple. As independent contractors, every call that comes through can be considered a bid. Like other independent contractors, we're not under obligation to accept every bid that comes to the table. They can whine about it, but, ultimately, they can't touch us more than a passive aggressive email or text about acceptance rate.
My own acceptance rate when driving in Philly has hit single digits at times.
For real? They don't actually enforce it or use it as a path to deactivation? These stories of inexplicable deactivation are jaw dropping.
 
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