It's to hot outside for Amazon Flex! Sorry not sorry..

jameson

New Member
I showed for a amazon flex delivery time slot early only to find a long line. After waiting close to 35-40 mins to make it to my spot in the warehouse I noticed the size of carts have increased in size. I pulled up to my spot and noticed I was given two carts instead of one. I did a package count and it ended up being 73 packages. There was no way I would be able to complete that many packages in the 3 hours remaining. I brought it to the team leads attention and he laughed and said there's nothing he could do. So I rejected the time slot and decided to drive away.
Amazon is being completely unfair with a 73 package load which equals to 2.45mins per package. It's crazy hot in Dallas. It's suppose to be 100 degrees late this week. I'm putting amazon flex on hold until September when it's cool or unless it's a cool day.
 
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pifhluke

New Member
If you had all houses and all within a short radius and some multiple packages per house 73 could probably be done in 3-3.5 hours but yeah throw a couple apartments or businesses in there and your hourly is just going to sink massively.
 

UTX1

Well-Known Member
I showed for a amazon flex delivery time slot early only to find a long line. After waiting close to 35-40 mins to make it to my spot in the warehouse I noticed the size of carts have increased in size. I pulled up to my spot and noticed I was given two carts instead of one. I did a package count and it ended up being 73 packages. There was no way I would be able to complete that many packages in the 3 hours remaining. I brought it to the team leads attention and he laughed and said there's nothing he could do. So I rejected the time slot and decided to drive away.
Amazon is being completely unfair with a 73 package load which equals to 2.45mins per package. It's crazy hot in Dallas. It's suppose to be 100 degrees late this week. I'm putting amazon flex on hold until September when it's cool or unless it's a cool day.
I don't blame you one bit. I've done more than 80 and it sure didn't happen in 4 hours.
Except that sometimes a driver might get only a dozen packages and get done right away.
No matter, you can refuse just like that and bravo to you for proving the point ! :smiles::smiles::smiles:

73 would be reasonable for an 8 hour shift paying $144, but I haven't seem many 8hr blocks
being offered up or scheduled lately. There are days that just don't add up so sometimes
you have to do a little quick math and pick and choose. You'll also notice the deliveries are
not considered late until 21:00, so they even count on some drivers running the route until dark,
even if they have to run all day to do it, regardless of how much they're getting paid to deliver.
They're counting on the desperation factor. Don't be desperate:frown:, there's too many ways to go.

Also, another contractor called Dynamex pays by the package to their subs to deliver Amazon.
With 73 packs @ $72 paid that's about $0.99 per carton. Dynamex pays more than that,
even after taking their cut. Just something to measure it by.
 

J.F.R.

Active Member
I showed for a amazon flex delivery time slot early only to find a long line. After waiting close to 35-40 mins to make it to my spot in the warehouse I noticed the size of carts have increased in size. I pulled up to my spot and noticed I was given two carts instead of one. I did a package count and it ended up being 73 packages. There was no way I would be able to complete that many packages in the 3 hours remaining. I brought it to the team leads attention and he laughed and said there's nothing he could do. So I rejected the time slot and decided to drive away.
Amazon is being completely unfair with a 73 package load which equals to 2.45mins per package. It's crazy hot in Dallas. It's suppose to be 100 degrees late this week. I'm putting amazon flex on hold until September when it's cool or unless it's a cool day.
Good job on declining, but you might have been able to finish it in the 3hrs if locations were close and some multiple packages. I did my estimate the other day, here's why I have been finishing in about 2.5 max 3 hrs.

As soon as you arrive at a location, scan the box, left at front door, walk fast to customers door, knock, ring door bell and leave. All of that can be done in about 30 seconds or less. If you wait for customer to arrive to the door that extra 30 seconds to 1 minute can cost you an hour on several packages.....

I literally pull up, scan package and leave package at front door, rinse and repeat. Had a customer tell me today why did I knock on his door so loud, my replay was you want your delivery right, he just looked at me puzzled while I drove away.........


Keep it moving people, get it done ASAP and get home
peace
 

UTX1

Well-Known Member
Had a customer tell me today why did I knock on his door so loud, my replay was you want your delivery right, he just looked at me puzzled while I drove away.........
Mine went the other way. Dropping a box of huggies diapers.
Lady said why didn't you knock louder ? I barely heard you .

Said, I didn't want to disturb the baby. She smiled and got happy.
 

FlexDriver

Well-Known Member
Mine went the other way. Dropping a box of huggies diapers.
Lady said why didn't you knock louder ? I barely heard you .

Said, I didn't want to disturb the baby. She smiled and got happy.
UTX1
Just keep the same scenario and replace the box of Diapers with box of condoms. What will be the possible conversation??
 

UTX1

Well-Known Member
UTX1
Just keep the same scenario and replace the box of Diapers with box of condoms. What will be the possible conversation??
Okay, I'll play...

She comes to the door, showing just about everything her momma gave her,
panting and huffing sez "...sorry, I couldn't hear you knocking... I had a bag over my head..." :eek:

I say, " no problem, ma'am...we've all been there...thank you for shopping with Amazon !" :biggrin:

Nine months later, same house....I'm still dropping off diapers anyway.
 

jameson

New Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Good job on declining, but you might have been able to finish it in the 3hrs if locations were close and some multiple packages. I did my estimate the other day, here's why I have been finishing in about 2.5 max 3 hrs.

As soon as you arrive at a location, scan the box, left at front door, walk fast to customers door, knock, ring door bell and leave. All of that can be done in about 30 seconds or less. If you wait for customer to arrive to the door that extra 30 seconds to 1 minute can cost you an hour on several packages.....

I literally pull up, scan package and leave package at front door, rinse and repeat. Had a customer tell me today why did I knock on his door so loud, my replay was you want your delivery right, he just looked at me puzzled while I drove away.........


Keep it moving people, get it done ASAP and get home
peace
That would be the perfect situation for you. Everyone lives in a different city with different city layouts. 3 hours may seem like nothing to you but in my city it's not. You also have to calculate the time it takes to get to the first stop which happen to be 20mins away sometimes. Also take into account apartments, gate codes to enter & being stuck at the gate, apartments on the sixth floor, parking issues, traffic. Some days I've finished in 2 hours and some days I barely finished in 4 hours.
 

J.F.R.

Active Member
That would be the perfect situation for you. Everyone lives in a different city with different city layouts. 3 hours may seem like nothing to you but in my city it's not. You also have to calculate the time it takes to get to the first stop which happen to be 20mins away sometimes. Also take into account apartments, gate codes to enter & being stuck at the gate, apartments on the sixth floor, parking issues, traffic. Some days I've finished in 2 hours and some days I barely finished in 4 hours.

I'm pretty sure Dallas can't be worst than Florida. especially South Florida. I've worked out West in the Farms to Miami Beach traffic and still get it done. At first I took 5 hrs, then 4 hrs and now at my longest I'm rite around 3 hrs. but usually 2.5 It's all about technique........
 

jameson

New Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
I'm pretty sure Dallas can't be worst than Florida. especially South Florida. I've worked out West in the Farms to Miami Beach traffic and still get it done. At first I took 5 hrs, then 4 hrs and now at my longest I'm rite around 3 hrs. but usually 2.5 It's all about technique........
It's crazy to even compare Dallas to Miami! Miami is 55.27 sq miles vs Dallas 385 sq miles. Dallas is 6x times bigger in traveling land. I clearly have more land to travel. I'm not here to debate anyone. Technique helps but that's not the only factor. Good for you if can finish 73 packages in 2.5-3 hours. That's not the case for everyone. I made this post to expression my opinion not debate anyone.
 

J.F.R.

Active Member
It's crazy to even compare Dallas to Miami! Miami is 55.27 sq miles vs Dallas 385 sq miles. Dallas is 6x times bigger in traveling land. I clearly have more land to travel. I'm not here to debate anyone. Technique helps but that's not the only factor. Good for you if can finish 73 packages in 2.5-3 hours. That's not the case for everyone. I made this post to expression my opinion not debate anyone.


My apologies if I offended you, I think many times we as individuals are not considerate enough

peace
 
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AllenChicago

Well-Known Member
Do you guys turn your car off at each stop? Just wondering.

Maybe cars are better now, but my 90,000 mile Lexus GS300 blew a timing belt, sprung a radiator leak, and started leaking oil really bad from the upper cylinder head, after 2 months of delivering just 25 packages a day in the Summer of 2001. I used to turn it off at each stop. My mechanic said that this stresses a car immensely.. especially if you have your A/C compressor engaged at start-up time, and do it over and over and over.

Was only able to get $3,500 trade-in for that car, because there were so many mechanical issues.
 

J.F.R.

Active Member
Do you guys turn your car off at each stop? Just wondering. I used to leave mine running when doing delivery work. Maybe cars are better now, but my 90,000 mile Lexus GS300 blew a timing belt, sprung a radiator leak, and started leaking oil really bad, after 2 months of delivering just 25 packages a day in the Summer of 2001. I used to turn it off at each stop. My mechanic said that this stresses a car immensely.. especially if you have your A/C compressor engaged at start-up time, and do it over and over and over.
I leave my car running, turning on/off your car so much will damage the starter as well.

I only turn my car off when I get home, the whole time IM delivering I leave my car on. Rare exception that I have to go inside of a building where I know I will be more than 2-3 mins away from my car.

I would say 95% of the time I leave my car on while doing deliveries
 

AllenChicago

Well-Known Member
I leave my car running, turning on/off your car so much will damage the starter as well.

I only turn my car off when I get home, the whole time IM delivering I leave my car on. Rare exception that I have to go inside of a building where I know I will be more than 2-3 mins away from my car.

I would say 95% of the time I leave my car on while doing deliveries
Thanks for the reply, J.F.R.. Apparently your training and common-sense are more advanced than mine was, back in the day! :cool:
 

FlexZone

Active Member
Before you reject a cart/load I hope you are at least looking at the area and/ or addresses. You may be missing out on a very easy run. Vice versa 12 packages may be your worst run.

The most I've had was 76 pkgs but when all scanned in when I checked the to do list I only had 30 stops to make and I easily completed it with in my normal average 2.5 hours. I've also had as few as 10 pkgs and it still took me the same time as they were spread out all over Dallas from as far north as McKinney to as far south as Highland park.

At the end of the day it averages out so I choose not to reject any whole cart/ route, but I have rejected individual pkgs if I notice and oddball location that doesn't mesh with the majority of the other drops.
 

UTX1

Well-Known Member
Before you reject a cart/load I hope you are at least looking at the area and/ or addresses. You may be missing out on a very easy run. Vice versa 12 packages may be your worst run.

The most I've had was 76 pkgs but when all scanned in when I checked the to do list I only had 30 stops to make and I easily completed it with in my normal average 2.5 hours. I've also had as few as 10 pkgs and it still took me the same time as they were spread out all over Dallas from as far north as McKinney to as far south as Highland park.

At the end of the day it averages out so I choose not to reject any whole cart/ route, but I have rejected individual pkgs if I notice and oddball location that doesn't mesh with the majority of the other drops.
All of this is true.

I would add that apartments or businesses on a Sunday or after 5pm anyday
will likely slow you down as well. Rather than have to return to the station,
I'll bring this to the shift assistant's attention prior to departure, just to see if
any common sense will prevail. It's usually 50/50.
 

GEXP

Member
UTX1, I bow to your persistence and unmitigated BS on behalf of the scrUBER and Amazone Hierarchy....Damn Son!! What are they Payin' Ya!?
 
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