Is Uber reducing drunk driving? New study says NO

I_Like_Spam

Well-Known Member
Geeze, I've seen a lot of cynical, bitter, Uber haters here; but to condemn Copperwolf359's uplifting message is the lowest of the low!

I'm no "über hater" at all. But for Uber to take credit for people getting home safely is a bit of stretch. Its like crediting Wal-mart because people ate the food they bought there and didn't starve to death.

There were other solutions to people getting food, as well as not driving drunk.
 

ChortlingCrison

Well-Known Member
I think anytime a drunk gets driven home by someone sober, (be that friend/relative/various transportation services etc), is helping reduce that. But for uber to say they are the end all b all, is just BS, like some mentioned before. Obviously they could care less what the drunk driving ratio is as long as they can get as many drivers out there at basement bargain rates.
 

kc ub'ing!

Well-Known Member
I haven't heard any firm statistics, but it would surprise me greatly if DUI percentages have not gone down since Rideshare's been an option. I see all the drunk millennials I keep off the road and think back to my 20's when me and my boys would rock, paper, scissor to determine who was, "coolest" to drive us all home. A taxi? Hell no that costs! But if we had a cheap, quick, easy and lets face it, cool option like Uber back then... I wouldn't have had take so many risks. Those bastards knew I always chose rock!
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
Quoting the author (Ralston) who was quoting the authors (from the universities):

"...despite the soaring popularity of Uber and other ride-sharing services,
there still may not be enough ride-share drivers available yet
to make a dent on drunken driving, the authors said...."

So, it seems there aren't enough Uber drivers. Well, everybody here knows that.
Hopefully, Uber will hire some more drivers soon. What are they waiting for ?
Having one driver per square yard is not dense enough it seems. Ramping up to one driver
per square foot should do the trick. Everybody get out of their cars and huddle together.
We'll need to make some room for all these new drivers. Alright, everybody choose a drunk.
I got one ! Hey this one is funny. Mine has a hat ! what's yours wearing? Nothing ! Wow !
You need one driver for each bar patron.

But only at closing time.

Then they can go home.
 

UTX1

Well-Known Member
You need one driver for each bar patron.

But only at closing time.

Then they can go home.
Okay, one driver per patron. We'll have to make it work.
But TWO trailer park girls for each passenger.

(they go 'round the outside, ya know ?)
 

Disgusted Driver

Well-Known Member
Given that from 9PM to 3AM I am driving impaired people around, it can't be a bad thing BUT I can tell you that on Friday and Saturday night, I see more than my fair share of impaired drivers, weaving, not turning lights on, going wrong way down a one way street, driving slow, ... so better or not, it's still a big problem.
 

Transportador

Well-Known Member
Uber's claim is totally flaw for one obvious reason that somehow nobody mentioned here = Not all Uber drivers are willing to drive the drunks home! A whole lot of us do not drive late nights for this exact reason. Drunks are stupid, at their worst behavior, do not tip, do not know where they are, and worst of all, might PUKE in your car!
 

uberparadise

Well-Known Member
(Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)
A new study casts doubt on Uber’s claim that ride-sharing has reduced drunken driving.

Researchers at Oxford University and the University of Southern California who examined county-level data in the United States before and after the arrival of Uber and its competitors in those markets found that ride-sharing had no effect on drinking-related or holiday- and weekend-related fatalities.


One reason could be that, despite the soaring popularity of Uber and other ride-sharing services, there still may not be enough ride-share drivers available yet to make a dent on drunken driving, the authors said. They also suggest that the tipsy riders who now call Uber are the ones who formerly would have called a taxi. For others, the odds of getting a DUI are still so low that many would prefer to gamble rather than lay out money for a ride-sharing service. Drunks, after all, are just not rational.

“The takeaway for me is that there’s still tons of room for improvement when it comes to reducing drunk driving fatalities,” David Kirk, a co-author of the study, said Wednesday in an interview via Skype.

The new study — which was published July 22 in the American Journal of Epidemiology — adds a new element to the debate over the merits of the popular and disruptive business model.

Uber pointed to other recent research that back up its contention that ride-sharing cuts down on drunken driving. A paper co-authored by researchers at Providence College and Stonehill College found reductions in DUI’s of as much as 62 percent, as well as declines in fatal accidents.

The company also said surveys show at least 80 percent of its riders have said that the service helped them avoid drinking and driving, and that its peak usage coincides with times when people are barhopping and partying.

“We’re glad Uber can provide an alternative to drunk driving and help people make more responsible choices,” Uber spokeswoman Brooke Anderson said in an email. “Our ridership numbers show that trips peak at times when people are more likely to be out drinking and 80% of riders says that Uber has helped them personally avoid drinking and driving.”


Drunk driving is the largest cause of traffic fatalities, claiming more 10,000 lives a year, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

Uber, meanwhile, is now operating in 490 cities around the world, and its use as an on-call designated driver is part of its marketing appeal. The San Francisco-based company’s website claims that drunk driving-related crashes fell by 60 per month among drivers under 30 years old in the California markets where UberX began operating, thereby preventing an estimated 1,800 crashes since July 2012. Uber also has partnered with Mothers Against Drunk Driving to reduce drunk driving. “A city with Uber has . . . fewer drunk drivers on the streets,” Uber has said.
But Kirk, a professorial fellow at Nuffield College and associate professor of sociology at the University of Oxford, and co-author Noli Brazil, a researcher at USC’s Spatial Sciences Institute, said people should be skeptical of such broad claims.

The authors analyzed the county by county traffic fatalities from 2005 to 2014 in the 100 most populated metropolitan areas, comparing those areas where Uber had arrived to those where ride-sharing had not, and then controlling for differences. The authors examined drunk driving-related, weekend- and holiday-specific crashes. They found no association with the number of subsequent traffic fatalities in those categories.

One factor may be the sheer size of the problem and still relatively low number of Uber drivers. Although approximately 450,000 people now drive for Uber, there are 210 million licensed drivers in the United States — and an estimated 4.2 million adults who drive impaired, the study says.


“Sure, there are over 1 million arrests for drunk driving a year in the United States. . . .ut that’s nothing compared to the number of people and the number of incidents of drunk driving,” Kirk said. “In the grand scheme of the massive volume of drunk drivers on the road, it’s hard to foresee Uber making a dent, unless the growth continues like it has for several more years.”



Kirk said that the authors were somewhat surprised at the lack of research on Uber’s impact on drunken driving. After scouring the literature, the authors could find only one other academic study of Uber’s impact on drunken driving. That study — which was conducted by Brad Greenwood and Sunil Wattal at Temple University — examined data from California and found that the low-cost UberX service had “yielded a significant reduction” in traffic fatalities while the luxury UberBlack had not

The growth of Uber and its competitors suggests that more research needs to be done.

“I’m not saying Uber might not have an effect in the future,” Kirk said. “As of now, I think there are other opportunities to lower drunk driving.”
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...ber-reducing-drunk-driving-new-study-says-no/
Everything uber makes claim to is BS.
Here is the rub- Uber allows people to drink more than they would normally. With Uber at their finger tips, they get a false sense of security. They have that one extra shot or drink, which often leads to even more drinks. "Hey I can call an Uber give me another shot". Maybe if Uber used plain clothes officers as drivers, they could arrest the ones that are so drunk they might harm themselves even walking to their door. The final insult is Uber sticks the naïve driver with this very volatile, dangerous rider. We have all seen what happens in many cases. Drivers are on the front lines, and Uber collects the surge commission from the anerbreated passenger. Sometimes they can't even give an address!
 

phillipzx3

Well-Known Member
Yeah I needed a cab several times when I was younger way before Uber existed and I remember being told a 10 mile cab ride would be $50.00. Because we had 3 cab companies that operated here, and they sucked. Well $ 50.00 in 1990 dollars, that's a bit steep when gas was just at $1.00 a gallon so taxis were out of the question. So what could you do if you needed to go somewhere at night and didn't want to walk 5 miles with someone one way, and 5 miles back alone as a teenager in a huge suburb just outside Los Angeles. No see walking at night is not going to happen either, when you think about that at least not without some kind of weapon like a gun. I got mugged during the day here, probably get killed at night or kidnapped. Oh wait that almost happened too. As for drunk driving well a $5 Uber ride is about the price of a good shot of liquor. So maybe just budget out 2 drinks, or if you're a true alcoholic, I know I was sometimes, you could sacrifice something like food in place of the $10.00 Uber rides to the bar and home.
Posting $10 Uber rides is all fine and dandy until you awake from your hangover only to see you've been duped by surge and that $50 cab ride (or $10 Uber) turned into a $150 surge trip.

I love it when people talk about how cheap Uber is, then post of how they only work surge.

As for decreasing drunk driving...at any time at night, I can walk into a bar with the Uber rider app open, only to see a few Uber drivers sipping a beer waiting for a ping.

Uber reducing drunk driving is total nonsense.
 

Disgusted Driver

Well-Known Member
Posting $10 Uber rides is all fine and dandy until you awake from your hangover only to see you've been duped by surge and that $50 cab ride (or $10 Uber) turned into a $150 surge trip.

I love it when people talk about how cheap Uber is, then post of how they only work surge.

As for decreasing drunk driving...at any time at night, I can walk into a bar with the Uber rider app open, only to see a few Uber drivers sipping a beer waiting for a ping.

Uber reducing drunk driving is total nonsense.
I'm a little skeptical about Uber drivers sipping beer waiting for a ping. While I'm sure it's happened, I sincerely doubt it's a widespread phenomena. I look carefully to see where people are and have never seen any evidence of it in Raleigh and it would be harder to tell now that Uber put's the car on the nearest street on the app now so that you can't see if someone is sitting in their living room.
 

Trebor

Well-Known Member
I have had a beer during dinner and then Uber -- later that night - after a shower, lots of toothpaste and mouthwash. One beer, but that counts as sipping on a beer and ubering right? Actually, I may do it tonight.
 

Trebor

Well-Known Member
Anyways, I used to drive myself home after a few drinks. Taxi's were too dang expensive to take to the bar and back. We don't have subways or a train worth 2 pennies here. Now, I Uber when I go out. So, yes, I believe it does cut down on drinking and driving.
 
There is no question there are people taking Uber instead of driving while drunk that would never have paid 4 times the Uber rates for a taxi. I don't really care what a study is saying. It's really common sense.
 

metal_orion

Active Member
Las
It stopped the smart ones but I've watched many a drunk stagger out to their car and drive off while I wait for my one/two pax. The formerly full parking lot is empty by the end of the night and I only drove two people home. All those cars didn't drive themselves.
Last Sunday in the morning I saw a guy completely slept on the wheel on the middle lane of the 90 northbound. He was the one causing all that traffic going to the airport. I thought what a lucky dumb**s.
 
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