Is Uber killing the U.S. middle class?

Cold Fusion

Well-Known Member

Uber is joining the ranks of mature tech giants that saw their leaders —  typically harsh entrepreneur-founders  —  replaced by experienced ex-bankers and ex-CEOs. Uber’s CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, who was brought on board in 2017, is on a mission to shut down moonshot projects and cut costs to bring Uber to profitability.

Uber was an idea to solve a genuine problem, but it has evolved into the worst nightmare of every management consultant.

The company has achieved organically what every consultant strives for : It has severed the link between top management and workers. All of the intelligence and decision-making is kept at the C-suite level, while the workers are given the (illusion of) control and freedom over how and when they work.


For now, Uber also seems well equipped to withstand legislative challenges like AB5. The company is already testing app changes, such as letting drivers set their own rate, to meet AB5’s tests and avoid automatic reclassification of its drivers to full-time employees.

These and other legislative changes will continue to challenge Uber, but they won’t stop it because Uber is not a mere regulatory arbitrage; it is an evolutionary step in management.

Analysts are beginning to realize this. And that’s turning Uber into the conviction call of 2020.
 

_Tron_

Well-Known Member
There are a number of mechanisms at work demolishing the middle class. Uber will have to take a number.

With middle management out of the way the next agenda item is to wait for autonomously driven cars to remove the largest human resource from the equation; the driver.

I guess it's just called automation. or put another way, a true [C-suite] Money Machine.

What will top management do with it's time then? Have a circle jerk?

Maybe that's why women complain of the glass ceiling.
 

peteyvavs

Member
Uber isn’t destroying the middle class, it’s all the dumb ass uneducated, unskilled people who are too lazy to get an education.
Uber is a stepping stone, for others it investment money, and most are too dumb to take advantage of opportunities freely and abundantly available too them because they are lazy.
 

IR12

Well-Known Member

Uber is joining the ranks of mature tech giants that saw their leaders —  typically harsh entrepreneur-founders  —  replaced by experienced ex-bankers and ex-CEOs. Uber’s CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, who was brought on board in 2017, is on a mission to shut down moonshot projects and cut costs to bring Uber to profitability.

Uber was an idea to solve a genuine problem, but it has evolved into the worst nightmare of every management consultant.

The company has achieved organically what every consultant strives for : It has severed the link between top management and workers. All of the intelligence and decision-making is kept at the C-suite level, while the workers are given the (illusion of) control and freedom over how and when they work.


For now, Uber also seems well equipped to withstand legislative challenges like AB5. The company is already testing app changes, such as letting drivers set their own rate, to meet AB5’s tests and avoid automatic reclassification of its drivers to full-time employees.

These and other legislative changes will continue to challenge Uber, but they won’t stop it because Uber is not a mere regulatory arbitrage; it is an evolutionary step in management.

Analysts are beginning to realize this. And that’s turning Uber into the conviction call of 2020.
What’s killing the middle class is a mindset that finds it acceptable not to value the people that keeps a company’s doors open imo.
 

UberProphet?

Well-Known Member
Uber isn’t destroying the middle class, it’s all the dumb ass uneducated, unskilled people who are too lazy to get an education.
Uber is a stepping stone, for others it investment money, and most are too dumb to take advantage of opportunities freely and abundantly available too them because they are lazy.
When we all become educated and skilled professionals, who's going to clean the toilets and wait the tables?
 

losiglow

Well-Known Member
Uber isn’t destroying the middle class, it’s all the dumb ass uneducated, unskilled people who are too lazy to get an education.
Uber is a stepping stone, for others it investment money, and most are too dumb to take advantage of opportunities freely and abundantly available too them because they are lazy.
"dumb ass uneducated" is a little harsh. Yes, for many of them, it was the daunting prospect of college. But many people fall into those situations due to family or life situations.

But 👍 on investment money. I certainly consider myself the middle class. Uber has helped me there. I made $22K gross last year and invested $9K of it. Nearly maxed out my Roth as well as the wifey's with Uber money only.
 

sellkatsell44

Well-Known Member
"dumb ass uneducated" is a little harsh. Yes, for many of them, it was the daunting prospect of college. But many people fall into those situations due to family or life situations.

But 👍 on investment money. I certainly consider myself the middle class. Uber has helped me there. I made $22K gross last year and invested $9K of it. Nearly maxed out my Roth as well as the wifey's with Uber money only.
Maxed out on my roth last year and will almost for this year soon, also 401k.

but I consider myself very poor amongst the pple I live/interact with.

still if I’m not chasing for a posh zip code or mega stuff, I can afford a plane ticket or two each year to somewhere nice.

off season of course.
 

Funky Monkey

Well-Known Member

Uber is joining the ranks of mature tech giants that saw their leaders —  typically harsh entrepreneur-founders  —  replaced by experienced ex-bankers and ex-CEOs. Uber’s CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, who was brought on board in 2017, is on a mission to shut down moonshot projects and cut costs to bring Uber to profitability.

Uber was an idea to solve a genuine problem, but it has evolved into the worst nightmare of every management consultant.

The company has achieved organically what every consultant strives for : It has severed the link between top management and workers. All of the intelligence and decision-making is kept at the C-suite level, while the workers are given the (illusion of) control and freedom over how and when they work.


For now, Uber also seems well equipped to withstand legislative challenges like AB5. The company is already testing app changes, such as letting drivers set their own rate, to meet AB5’s tests and avoid automatic reclassification of its drivers to full-time employees.

These and other legislative changes will continue to challenge Uber, but they won’t stop it because Uber is not a mere regulatory arbitrage; it is an evolutionary step in management.

Analysts are beginning to realize this. And that’s turning Uber into the conviction call of 2020.
My pea brain isn't grasping this? I know of at least one management consulting company where everyone's pretty senior. The middle class may have issues but a relatively new company like Uber certainly can't be blamed for a trend that started a generation or two ago
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member

Uber is joining the ranks of mature tech giants that saw their leaders —  typically harsh entrepreneur-founders  —  replaced by experienced ex-bankers and ex-CEOs. Uber’s CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, who was brought on board in 2017, is on a mission to shut down moonshot projects and cut costs to bring Uber to profitability.

Uber was an idea to solve a genuine problem, but it has evolved into the worst nightmare of every management consultant.

The company has achieved organically what every consultant strives for : It has severed the link between top management and workers. All of the intelligence and decision-making is kept at the C-suite level, while the workers are given the (illusion of) control and freedom over how and when they work.


For now, Uber also seems well equipped to withstand legislative challenges like AB5. The company is already testing app changes, such as letting drivers set their own rate, to meet AB5’s tests and avoid automatic reclassification of its drivers to full-time employees.

These and other legislative changes will continue to challenge Uber, but they won’t stop it because Uber is not a mere regulatory arbitrage; it is an evolutionary step in management.

Analysts are beginning to realize this. And that’s turning Uber into the conviction call of 2020.
im SURE someone at Uber Will be CONVICTED by 2020 !
 

Jon77

Well-Known Member
This is only the beginning, the middle class will be gutted out over the coming decades.
This is not just Uber, this is happening across the board across various industries.
Its called automation, its a mega-trend that is still in it's infancy.
Paccar who owns Peterbilt and Kenworth are trying to get rid of the drivers in the cabs.
As is Volvo Heavy Freight and of course the Tesla semi project.
John Deer is building drones that will monitor crops automatically and they already have tractors that use gps grids to work the fields with minimum human input.
Amazon and their fulfillment warehouse use massive amounts of stocking robots.
UPS and Fedex are testing the possibility of removing the delivery drivers, Intuitive Surgical is working on machines that do surgery better than highly trained doctors, IBM's Watson is already better at detecting cancer than trained oncologists.
Language translator are now almost being replaced with software apps, and security guards are soon to be replaced by roaming robots that never take a nap.
Nvidia is working on machine learning computers that write their own code.
Retail, fast food, healthcare, heavy manufacturing, virtually every industry will be changed.
Artificial intelligence and robotics is a force that will have wide reaching impacts in every employment category.

Machines work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year without breaks, holidays, or salary increases. Once installed, they cost only pennies on the dollar for electricity and sporadic maintenance. Machines do not demand better working conditions, holiday time, or exaggerated pensions.

The good news is this is a trend that will take years to fully come into fruition, so rather then trying to fight this unstoppable shift its better to make the trend your friend.
Find out who will benefit and who will lose, and position your bets accordingly.
 

DriverMark

Well-Known Member
There will be plenty of lazy asses left to clean out 💩.
Nope. The lazy asses don't even clean out :poop: . Why whenever I go to a hotel it's immigrants cleaning the rooms........ the lazy asses are in the homeless camps working on their next "Please Help" sign so they can score their next hit.
 

BogusServiceAnimal

Well-Known Member

Uber is joining the ranks of mature tech giants that saw their leaders —  typically harsh entrepreneur-founders  —  replaced by experienced ex-bankers and ex-CEOs. Uber’s CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, who was brought on board in 2017, is on a mission to shut down moonshot projects and cut costs to bring Uber to profitability.

Uber was an idea to solve a genuine problem, but it has evolved into the worst nightmare of every management consultant.

The company has achieved organically what every consultant strives for : It has severed the link between top management and workers. All of the intelligence and decision-making is kept at the C-suite level, while the workers are given the (illusion of) control and freedom over how and when they work.


For now, Uber also seems well equipped to withstand legislative challenges like AB5. The company is already testing app changes, such as letting drivers set their own rate, to meet AB5’s tests and avoid automatic reclassification of its drivers to full-time employees.

These and other legislative changes will continue to challenge Uber, but they won’t stop it because Uber is not a mere regulatory arbitrage; it is an evolutionary step in management.

Analysts are beginning to realize this. And that’s turning Uber into the conviction call of 2020.
I think there are advantages to the on demand economy, as it is on demand income for laborers as well. The key is to have the independent contractor aspect enforced and regulated. All complaints that are not fully verified also need to be disregarded by gig platforms. More worker's protections are necessary to keep the gig economy stable and thriving.
 
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