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Is this true

Disgusted Driver

Well-Known Member
I disagree and will go down fighting strenuously in an audit if it came to that. My home is my place of business for my Uber business. I sit home, wait for call, go out and do call and then retun home if it's not busy out. I deduct every mile I have the app on. On Saturday's I'll go out and run errands while I have the app on. If I get a call I'll stop what I'm doing and take the ping.
 

TCar

Well-Known Member
If my app is on, I am deduction mileage.
If I take someone 1 hour north, then have to turn my app off to deadhead back,
I am deducting mileage until I get back to home spot, then either turn on app or go home
and stop tracking mileage.
If I am working, I am tracking mileage.
 

UberTaxPro

Well-Known Member
Past Sponsor
I found this on the h&r website.

View attachment 383846

I thought we could claim all miles.
You can deduct all "business miles"

The new sharing economy has created gaps between the emerging, unclear tax situations and traditional law. Your question is a good example of this.

In 2016, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen stated the IRS was addressing the “interesting tax situations” that the sharing economy has given rise to. Also, the IRS launched a Sharing Economy Resource Center to help with the confusion. However, specific information as to how to answer your question can not be found there along with many other "grey area" questions.

Other businesses will often use an established "home office" to avoid any business stop rule issues.
 

Daisey77

Well-Known Member
Every mile you drive while online is deductible. Every tax article Ive seen says you can claim the miles from when you first leave your house to your first passenger but not from your Last Passenger home. I usually keep the app on until I'm just a few minutes from home. However, usually only have my premium platforms on. That way at least if I get a hit it will be worth it
 

UberTaxPro

Well-Known Member
Past Sponsor
Every mile you drive while online is deductible. Every tax article Ive seen says you can claim the miles from when you first leave your house to your first passenger but not from your Last Passenger home. I usually keep the app on until I'm just a few minutes from home. However, usually only have my premium platforms on. That way at least if I get a hit it will be worth it
What happens if your last drop has a 60 mile dead head back through a state you’re not authorized to pick up in? That happens everyday to CT drivers dropping at NY airports.
All “businesses miles” are deductible
 
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Invisible

Well-Known Member
What happens if your last drop has a 60 mile dead head back through a state you’re not authorized to pick up in? That happens everyday to CT drivers dropping at NY airports.
All “businesses miles” are deductible
That’s a great example. That happens to me, when I drop off in IL, but I’m not authorized to pickup riders in IL.
 

Daisey77

Well-Known Member
What happens if your last drop has a 60 mile dead head back through a state you’re not authorized to pick up in? That happens everyday to CT drivers dropping at NY airports.
All “businesses miles” are deductible
it looks like they've changed the wording or the rules because now it specifically says you can deduct the miles on the way home from The Last Passenger. Before it definitely did not say that. It's always been a Hot Topic
 

LADryver

Active Member
I found this on the h&r website.

View attachment 383846

I thought we could claim all miles.
In all business travel, the leg to home is personal, for the reason that, as in training I was told (in the IRS) "You go home for personal reasons". And the first leg out to do business is considered commuting. Everything in-between is business use so long as it is not on an exclusively personal break.
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You can always say that you live out of your car, that’s your home.
Then you would barely be able to write off most miles without a detailed log. You need a home base, even if you do not have a home, on any given day, and the base could change day by day.
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That’s a great example. That happens to me, when I drop off in IL, but I’m not authorized to pickup riders in IL.
Dead head miles back are commuting. Dead head miles to the next authorized pick up are business.
 

DriverMark

Well-Known Member
I start and end my mileage 1 mile from my home.thats my compute
Great point! My Holiday Convenience Store (7-11) 1 mile up the road. I stop there to grab my drink when going out. Sounds like that is where I start and end my work day!!

Odds are forever in your favor of never having to worry about mileage as long as you aren't doing something extremely stupid on your returns to cause attention. I track, but found that the miles Uber and Lyft gave me at year end are sufficient to claim. Believe in an audit situation that will be more than sufficient, along with my personal tracking. Highly unlikely to ever get audited. But how would the IRS determine the "commute" miles unless you self incriminate?
 

UberTaxPro

Well-Known Member
Past Sponsor
That’s a great example. That happens to me, when I drop off in IL, but I’m not authorized to pickup riders in IL.
It’s a grey area but IMO the mileage back to your authorized area at least, is a necessary & ordinary expense. It’s interesting that Uber now includes these dead head miles from ny back to ct in online miles as long as you keep the app on. In the past, the app would shut down shortly after the drop in ny. Does the app record your dead miles coming back from IL?
 

Invisible

Well-Known Member
It’s a grey area but IMO the mileage back to your authorized area at least, is a necessary & ordinary expense. It’s interesting that Uber now includes these dead head miles from ny back to ct in online miles as long as you keep the app on. In the past, the app would shut down shortly after the drop in ny. Does the app record your dead miles coming back from IL?
I don’t know if the app records the miles since I haven’t done R/S for s year yet. But it puts me unavailable and says something about how I must be registered in the other state. I checked with my hub. I can’t do IL pickups. But Im including those miles on the way back to my state.
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Dead head miles back are commuting. Dead head miles to the next authorized pick up are business.
However, it’s a gray area because I wouldn’t have been in IL, if I wasn’t dropping off pax. There’s no way up to 40 miles, or whatever it is, can’t be included. Chicago is 90 min from my area, so it’s doesn’t make sense I’d have to wait until the state border to start reclaiming miles.
 
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LADryver

Active Member
I don’t know if the app records the miles since I haven’t done R/S for s year yet. But it puts me unavailable and says something about how I must be registered in the other state. I checked with my hub. I can’t do IL pickups. But Im including those miles on the way back to my state.
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However, it’s a gray area because I wouldn’t have been in IL, if I wasn’t dropping off pax. There’s no way up to 40 miles, or whatever it is, can’t be included. Chicago is 90 min from my area, so it’s doesn’t make sense I’d have to wait until the state border to start reclaiming miles.
You do not need the app on where it would not function for you. It is not about the app. If you subsequently turn the app back on and accept a ride immediately after arriving back, the miles were business miles. If you just go home, they were not. Here is where you have control over whether something is or is not considered business. The difference in record keeping does apparently exist while Uber counts those miles for you. Otherwise with the app off, as you choose, you would have to count those miles yourself.
 
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