Is there an "Uber Courier Service"? Can there be?

Hornplayer

Active Member
Some company wants its package delivered to another company on the other side of town, or maybe in the next town over. They call Uber, the driver shows up at their door, they hand him the package and address, he goes to the destination, parks, walks in, and hands it to the receptionist at the destination.

Is this OK by Uber's agreement with their drivers?

If not, should it be? Maybe Uber can change their rules to specifically allow this? Would extra insurance be needed? Extra paperwork where the receiver has to sign for the package he receives? Would the Uber driver have to sign for it too? Could Uber charge the package-sender more, to cover these extra things? Would it still cost the sender less, than a (presently-existing) courier service? Uber has all the infrastructure in place.

It's sort of like "Uber Eats". No passenger ever gets in your car. You go to the restaurant, pick up a package (food), get back in your car, drive to the destination, give it to whoever's there.

Would it take much to make this more general "Uber Courier" a supported business?
 

mmn

Well-Known Member
I once had a rider who had me take her luggage. She followed me on her motorcycle. Got a nice tip too.

Not the gospel, but I haven't read anything that says there needs to be something with a pulse in the car.
 

Bbonez

Well-Known Member
I once had a rider who had me take her luggage. She followed me on her motorcycle. Got a nice tip too.
Did you inspect the bag? You could have been running drugs. If you got stopped by the police that motorcycle would have disappeared like a fart in the wind.
 

mmn

Well-Known Member
Did you inspect the bag? You could have been running drugs. If you got stopped by the police that motorcycle would have disappeared like a fart in the wind.
Nope, she was a crewperson a mega yacht. Wanted to leave her motorcycle at the port and needed a way to get her luggage there (or so she said)...!
 

Atom guy

Well-Known Member
I'm sure every driver has been an unwilling drug mule more than a few times. Does that count as "courier?"
 

jhearcht

Active Member
Would it take much to make this more general "Uber Courier" a supported business?
I'm surprised that UBER hasn't already added Courier Service to their diversification portfolio. I've had several pax ask if I could pickup something for them -- in one case a bottle of liquor, and another wanted cigarettes. They were willing to pay for the service. I even discussed the "courier" option in detail with a pax a few days ago. He wanted to pickup an envelope and bring it back home. He'd prefer to stay home and let the driver do the driving. But, instead he took the time to make the 30 minute round trip.

I doubt there'd be much money in it, unless UBER could displace the established business couriers, as they are exterminating taxi services. But there's definitely a need for a personal pickup & deliver service. However, UBER EATS doesn't seem to be carving a significant niche in food delivery.
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itsablackmarket

Well-Known Member
I wonder this every single day. I'm tired of dealing with people in my car. Would much rather ship items across town. I don't care if it's drugs either.
 

jhearcht

Active Member
It was called UberRush, and they killed it.
Bicycle couriers are a specialized service most appropriate for dense urban cities like New York and Boston. So it's no surprise that a completely separate service would fail to compete with established businesses. But simply adding a courier option to the current UBER service would be a no-brainer. It could work well in sprawling cities like LA, where there's a long drive to get anywhere. And drivers might not decline such trips as often as they do EATS, unless the pickups prove to be a time-consuming hassle.
 

dryverjohn

Well-Known Member
Better yet, start your own courier service. The software is easy, just need to get enough businesses signed up and create your own market. Liability is a lot lower on a package vs a person.
 
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