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Is not worth it to do ridesharing.

W00dbutcher

Member
988.00 / 62hr is 16ish/hr.
Now obviously that's online hours. Those hours also include dead time driving. So in between there and you can add even more money for the personal clientele..

As far as cars concern I paid 300 bucks for my leased vehicle which is a taxi. That covers Commercial insurance, Medallion fees, and also all maintenance and inspection fees. The only thing I pay for my vehicle is the gas and my lease weekly.

And as you can see I don't work 80 hours a week . I actually take a day or two off as well.
 

JohnnyBravo836

Well-Known Member
988.00 / 62hr is 16ish/hr.
Now obviously that's online hours. Those hours also include dead time driving. So in between there and you can add even more money for the personal clientele..

As far as cars concern I paid 300 bucks for my leased vehicle which is a taxi. That covers Commercial insurance, Medallion fees, and also all maintenance and inspection fees. The only thing I pay for my vehicle is the gas and my lease weekly.

And as you can see I don't work 80 hours a week . I actually take a day or two off as well.
Just to be clear, I didn't intend my comments to be criticism in any way, nor was I expressing any skepticism about your numbers. If anything, I was suggesting that those are not particularly surprising numbers for someone going at it well over 40 hours a week.

I'm in Syracuse, NY, and have been at this 2 months. I have to think every local market is unique, and you can't necessarily generalize from one to another. In my best week, I grossed $600 right after Xmas, in roughly 40 hours. I've grossed over $500 probably 3 or 4 times, and it required probably 32-40 hours. For the most part, I have avoided overnight hours and bar closings, although that's obviously when I can see that the larger surge prices are in effect. I can well imagine that someone who was willing to grind out overnights on a regular basis and work during snow storms could gross 700-800 or more even in Syracuse, and this is almost certainly a slowish market. (Most of the rides are college students and the working poor; only occasionally do I see well-heeled riders who are clearly making big bucks.) For the most part, if I stick to what are for me the busiest hours, I gross somewhere from $15-18 an hour. At the very best times, it may approach $25-30, but that has only happened a couple of times when larger surge prices were in effect. When I subtract gas right off the top, I'm probably netting $12-14 an hour, and that's before considering vehicle depreciation. For the time being, it suits my purposes, but I would never recommend it to anyone, or not anyone that I liked, anyway.

As has already been said above, it seems to me that this is better regarded as a hustle than a job; it might suit some people well given their particular situation and purposes, but anyone who is thinking of this as a full-time, long-term occupation is putting him or herself in a very precarious position. There's no long term security in this whatsoever, and it could easily be gone in a flash.
 

W00dbutcher

Member
No skepticism or criticism taken. Sometimes when you try to explain it it comes over the wrong way.

There's always going to be a market for people that need transportation. I can always go back transporting Medical if I need to. It's all about keeping yourself in a position to where you can Zig and zag at any given time to accommodate the market.
 

HeyJoe

Active Member
I use to make a killing on Medical/TMS when everyone said there was no way to do that. So having been with Uber since early November of 2013, I now just read and pay attention to the uber community, because as you all can see, if you disagree or say something the forum doesn't like. Well, let's just say it can get real critical in here. Combining the knowledge from cabbing and Uber puts you well ahead of the avg guy doing transportation. Good on ya! GO GO git em dude!
 

jaxbeachrides

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't pretend to know anything about the local Jacksonville market, and whether this is realistically possible. I would say that if you're working 7 days and 70-80 hours or more a week, then you are, in effect, working two full time jobs; $50K a year is not a whole lot of money for two full time jobs.

I also can't help noticing that 2000 mi a week is obviously 100,000 a year -- and those are hard miles on a car. At that rate, you'd probably burn through another car every year, assuming that you start out with an older used car that already has some mileage on it, which I would think would be the only reasonable way to do this. That's the sort of situation where you really have to figure vehicle depreciation into determining how much you're actually clearing per year.
2 of the last 3 cars I used for rideshare I got at auction for 1k with over 200k miles. One I sold for 2700 and the other one is worth about that much after I bought the tires and brakes. So mileage can be free - gas if you buy high mileage cars for very cheap.

I won't disclose all my secrets but since you're paid by the mile you will never make money in the rideshare business without driving at highway speeds. This means stay close to a freeway at all times and most of your rides will end up getting onto the freeway.

Yeah I worked 70 hours but who doesn't.

If you work a regular 9-5 you get up at 7 to get ready and be there by 9. Take an hour for lunch unpaid. Leave after work and get home by 6 or 7 you've already put in a 10-12 hour day for 8 hours pay.

Add in Saturday and just about any 6 day a week job consumes 70 hours a week working full time.
 

jonhjax

Well-Known Member
There's risk in everything. Driving to work, driving for work, crossing the street etc.

Before I got deactivated for reason not yet known, I was up to a steady 1000 a week, and that's right here in jacksonville at .60 a mile. It took 7 days a week and 2000 miles to do it, but it was still as good or better than most anything else I could make here.
$1000 a week and driving 2000 miles to get that pay, that's what, 50 cents per mile? I'm sure you never paid a penny in income tax because that's less than the IRS standard deduction for business use of a vehicle, but you got enough money to pay all of your expenses with a fair amount left for you. Good job, there.
 
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