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If PAX gets sick- wait for ambulance or drive to hospital?

michaeluberLA

New Member
If a PAX falls ill or passes out during the ride, should you pull over, call 911 and wait for the ambulance...or google the nearest emergency room and head on over?

What does Uber policy state regarding that? What about insurance and legal liability?

What would you do/ should you do?
 

Jufkii

Well-Known Member
You are on your own in most cases. Uber doesn't care . Since you are an independant contractor most insurance and liability cases fall on your shoulders and not Ubers. They might deactivate you though pending an investigation if they do find out however.
 

Tars Tarkas

Well-Known Member
I don't know an official policy, but the question is interesting.

I'd call 911 and go from there.

I'm not a medic. I can't assess whether fast transport to an ER (if I know where one is) is better than waiting for competent first aid and professional management.

In short, I'd want to be rid of the responsibility as fast as I can since I'm not qualified to assume it, and I would be supported in this by calling 911 and taking directions from there.

I can't imagine ever being faulted for that -- morally, legally, or practically.
 

Merc7186

Well-Known Member
...it depends on how much they are gonna tip.

This is actually funny because Ride share just opened up here this summer and the different news stations kept running stories about how much an ambulance ride was compared to an uber....then kept saying, in case of emergency, don't order an Uber as they aren't trained medical professionals. I could just see SU trying to talk his way in helping a woman deliver a baby in his backseat....lol
 
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mikes424

Well-Known Member
...it depends on how much they are gonna tip.

This is actually funny because Ride share just opened up here this summer and the different news stations kept running stories about how much an ambulance ride was compared to an uber....then kept saying, in case of emergency, don't order an Uber as they aren't trained medical professionals. I could just see SU trying to talk his way in helping a woman deliver a baby in his backseat....lol
If the ride was a pool and both parents were in the car would the arrival of the little one change the ride to UberX? LOL

Oh, and don't forget the clean up fee
 

JimKE

Well-Known Member
First of all, I doubt if Uber or Lyft have any policy on something like this. There are too many variables. You're on your own.

If a pax loses consciousness and you can't rouse them by yelling (NOT touching), I would stop right there and call 9-1-1 unless I was VERY close to a major hospital. There is no point in calling 911 en route to a hospital; nobody can come help a moving target.

If you do go to a hospital with an unconscious rider, go to the ambulance entrance -- NOT the ER entrance. If you go to the public ER entrance, you will not get immediate help.

The EMS door will have a code, probably. Try obvious things like *911, 911#, etc or pound on the door until someone comes to help you. If there are rescue/ambulance crews there, they will help you.
 

wk1102

Well-Known Member
Easy...

Take their phone and use their thumb to unlock it.

Dump rider at hospital.

Change the destination to airport/city/port/venue far away.

Drive to destination.

Change destination to hospital.

Pick up the now slightly coherent rider.

Take them home, end trip, tip yoursself the max.

Return phone, collect $15.00
 

Ezridax

Well-Known Member
Personally, it would depend on what is going on. Are they pulseless and apneic? I’m stopping. I can’t do CPR while driving. Are they having trouble breathing and I’m 5 min from the nearest ER (or firehouse). I’m driving. I will use my best judgment. If I end up getting sued, I have no problem going to court and explaining my reasoning. And if that means I lose, I can live with that.
 

Shakur

Well-Known Member
Neither, get them out of your car at the earliest convenienc, by any means, end the trip and ensure you report them in the app.
 

RynoHawk

Well-Known Member
It depends on the situation. How far is the hospital? What is the average wait time for EMS on a given day/night versus ETA to a hospital (to include traffic conditions, etc.). Are you trained in CPR/First Aid if needed? Are you comfortable performing CPR/First Aid if needed?

I would still call 911 even if you are close and driving to a hospital. Follow the operators instructions (whether they say stop and wait for EMS or to safely continue). This way you have a record that you called if needed. Whatever you do, you cannot typically be sued (at least not successfully) so long as you don't cause blatant harm. Most states have a "Good Samaritan" law which protects non EMS people who render aid.
 

Uber Crack

Well-Known Member
Author
Easy...

Take their phone and use their thumb to unlock it.

Dump rider at hospital.

Change the destination to airport/city/port/venue far away.

Drive to destination.

Change destination to hospital.

Pick up the now slightly coherent rider.

Take them home, end trip, tip yoursself the max.

Return phone, collect $15.00
Lmao :biggrin:
 

UberBastid

Well-Known Member
If the ride was a pool and both parents were in the car would the arrival of the little one change the ride to UberX? LOL

Oh, and don't forget the clean up fee
I used to be an EMT.
Lemme tell ya ... what a preggie mom can do to an ambulance is truly awesome.
It took me and my partner an hour to clean and restock after a delivery, and another half hour for me to shower and get into clean scrubs.
We were 'out of service' for two hours after we dropped off both patients.

After that I learned ... if I didn't think we'd make it, we'd deliver at home.
Let THEM clean it up.
 

JimKE

Well-Known Member
Whatever you do, you cannot typically be sued (at least not successfully) so long as you don't cause blatant harm. Most states have a "Good Samaritan" law which protects non EMS people who render aid.
You have to know your local laws. Last time I checked 38 states had Good Samaritan laws -- but the devil is in the details.

I'm an EMT and an EMS instructor, so I'm current on FLORIDA law. In FLORIDA, a rideshare driver absolutely would NOT be covered by our Good Samaritan law if they provide first aid to a rider. We are being paid to drive that pax, and that payment eliminates Good Samaritan protection in Florida.

OTOH, if you're driving rideshare and you stop to render aid at the scene of an accident, you would be covered -- as long as you're not treating your pax.

Also, in Florida, Good Samaritan is NOT immunity from lawsuit; it is a defense against a lawsuit, but again the success or failure of that defense depends on the facts of your specific case.

Laws in other states could vary greatly from Florida's, so you have to know your local law.
 

grayspinner

Well-Known Member
Pull ovee & call 911.

Emergency services can provide both onsite and in-route medical treatment. They will get treatment faster than I'd you drive them to the ER.

Plus, patients that come in via ambulance rather than walking in to the ER will generally get faster treatment.
 

ShinyAndChrome

Well-Known Member
I would call 911 and explain the situation, ask them what to do, as I started heading towards the er.
This is truly the best course of action.

Uber is not law, their TOS means nothing.

Call 911 first, and in court whatever 911 told you to do and you did is going to protect you massively. My guess is they will ask you to continue to the hospital if you can safely and it's close, else they will send an amber lamp, but that's just a guess. I have no idea, hence 911. Typically if you act like a sheep in legal matters and defer to law and authority you'll be good to go.
 

Ezridax

Well-Known Member
Plus, patients that come in via ambulance rather than walking in to the ER will generally get faster treatment.
Yeah right. I’ve put so many patients in the waiting room after getting to the ER on ambulance. Patients are still going to get triaged and those at lower priorities will still have to wait.
 

Alison Chains

Well-Known Member
Is pax/patient conscious enough to consent to a change of destination? If yes, go to said destination. If no, keep clock running and implement standard CPR/first aid measures. Or don't and just call an ambulance.

Is pax/patient DOA at agreed-upon destination? If yes, call authorities and swipe them out because their card and bank account are off-limits after they're been declared dead. If no, push them out and move on.

Dead simple, but you *must* have a protocol in place before you encounter the situation because you don't want to be making it up on the fly.
 
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