How to cut your losses driving for the rideshare company's

gizmotheboss

Active Member
I have crunch the numbers in my market Alameda county and Contra Costa County California. This is based on $0.54 per mile for car experiences and 25% cut for the ride share company's deductions. You have to drive for one hour going 60 mph to earn $13.80 for one hour. Now let's see how much after additional deductions like dead miles on the return trip to my hometown and miles to get to the pick up location. For example a ride going to Oakland airport, the ride share company paid me $21 for the trip. I drove 25.6 miles to complete the trip to the airport. I had to drive another 25.6 miles back to my hometown. After deducting $.54 a mile at 52.2 miles toltal for the trip to the airport and the return trip to my hometown. I lost $6.64 so I paid to give a free ride to the rider. Is it really worth it I guess so if you need the money. Here are a few tips

Never pick up no more 5 to 7 minutes to your pick up location.
Never pick up doing heavy commute hours unless fairs are 2X for more.
Try to avoid city driving because of wear in tear on your car.
Remember When picking up during surge pricing if the rider canceled the ride you only get paid the regular cancellation fair. Not the surge fair.
 

Jufkii

Well-Known Member
I have crunch the numbers in my market Alameda county and Contra Costa County California. This is based on $0.54 per mile for car experiences and 25% cut for the ride share company's deductions. You have to drive for one hour going 60 mph to earn $13.80 for one hour. Now let's see how much after additional deductions like dead miles on the return trip to my hometown and miles to get to the pick up location. For example a ride going to Oakland airport, the ride share company paid me $21 for the trip. I drove 25.6 miles to complete the trip to the airport. I had to drive another 25.6 miles back to my hometown. After deducting $.54 a mile at 52.2 miles toltal for the trip to the airport and the return trip to my hometown. I lost $6.64 so I paid to give a free ride to the rider. Is it really worth it I guess so if you need the money. Here are a few tips

Never pick up no more 5 to 7 minutes to your pick up location.
Never pick up doing heavy commute hours unless fairs are 2X for more.
Try to avoid city driving because of wear in tear on your car.
Remember When picking up during surge pricing if the rider canceled the ride you only get paid the regular cancellation fair. Not the surge fair.
.54 per mile to operate a car is misleading. Not many cars percentage wise cost that much to operate. Mine costs around .25/mile to operate. I would suggest figuring your cars true operating costs on a few sites that will give you a more accurate figure.
 

gizmotheboss

Active Member
$.54 is realistic, that's what the government allows for tax deductions for mileage. I believe it's a lot more for car expenses. I think you better go back to school and learn your math
 

Cary Grant

Well-Known Member
My cost of operation is 11% of my revenue (fuel, oil, tires, frequent washing and vaccuming, all maintenance, insurance, et al.), before tips, before other incentives, which lower my cost of operation several percentage points. The standard mileage deduction has no bearing on actual costs. You can choose either standard deduction, or actual expenses, if higher. My actual expenses have NEVER been anywhere close to the standard deduction, and I've been logging deductible business miles since the 1970s.
 

Aerodrifting

Well-Known Member
I have crunch the numbers in my market Alameda county and Contra Costa County California. This is based on $0.54 per mile for car experiences and 25% cut for the ride share company's deductions. You have to drive for one hour going 60 mph to earn $13.80 for one hour. Now let's see how much after additional deductions like dead miles on the return trip to my hometown and miles to get to the pick up location. For example a ride going to Oakland airport, the ride share company paid me $21 for the trip. I drove 25.6 miles to complete the trip to the airport. I had to drive another 25.6 miles back to my hometown. After deducting $.54 a mile at 52.2 miles toltal for the trip to the airport and the return trip to my hometown. I lost $6.64 so I paid to give a free ride to the rider. Is it really worth it I guess so if you need the money. Here are a few tips

Never pick up no more 5 to 7 minutes to your pick up location.
Never pick up doing heavy commute hours unless fairs are 2X for more.
Try to avoid city driving because of wear in tear on your car.
Remember When picking up during surge pricing if the rider canceled the ride you only get paid the regular cancellation fair. Not the surge fair.

This is based on $0.54 per mile for car expenses
Remember When picking up during surge pricing if the rider canceled the ride you only get paid the regular cancellation fare. Not the surge fare.

Fixed

If you cant even spell the basic words, It makes your argument a lot less convincing. English is not even my first language, If I can not stand your spelling I highly doubt anyone else can. Used cars don't cost $.54 a mile to maintain, But you are right about "Never pick up no more 5 to 7 minutes to your pick up location. Never pick up doing heavy commute hours unless fairs are 2X for more."
 

circle1

Well-Known Member
My cost of operation is 11% of my revenue (fuel, oil, tires, frequent washing and vaccuming, all maintenance, insurance, et al.), before tips, before other incentives, which lower my cost of operation several percentage points. The standard mileage deduction has no bearing on actual costs. You can choose either standard deduction, or actual expenses, if higher. My actual expenses have NEVER been anywhere close to the standard deduction, and I've been logging deductible business miles since the 1970s.

Thank you.
 

Julescase

Well-Known Member
I have crunch the numbers in my market Alameda county and Contra Costa County California. This is based on $0.54 per mile for car experiences and 25% cut for the ride share company's deductions. You have to drive for one hour going 60 mph to earn $13.80 for one hour. Now let's see how much after additional deductions like dead miles on the return trip to my hometown and miles to get to the pick up location. For example a ride going to Oakland airport, the ride share company paid me $21 for the trip. I drove 25.6 miles to complete the trip to the airport. I had to drive another 25.6 miles back to my hometown. After deducting $.54 a mile at 52.2 miles toltal for the trip to the airport and the return trip to my hometown. I lost $6.64 so I paid to give a free ride to the rider. Is it really worth it I guess so if you need the money. Here are a few tips

Never pick up no more 5 to 7 minutes to your pick up location.
Never pick up doing heavy commute hours unless fairs are 2X for more.
Try to avoid city driving because of wear in tear on your car.
Remember When picking up during surge pricing if the rider canceled the ride you only get paid the regular cancellation fair. Not the surge fair.

Uber no longer uses the 25% calculation for figuring out their cut, that ended in May.They now (usually) get much more than that - sometimes over 50% of the total fare. We no longer know exactly how they calculate their portion of the fare, Plus, we have the ability to alter the different cut amounts depending on what route we take.

The terms of service that you signed recently contains the new wording about fares and how their cut comes about. I just want to make sure you're aware of the fact that they take much more than 25%, I WISH they still only took 25%.
 

Jtdub

Well-Known Member
Why would you drive back 25 miles empty? If it is a peak time I can almost always get a DF ride or at least do some more rides in that area before heading back.
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
I have crunch the numbers in my market Alameda county and Contra Costa County California. This is based on $0.54 per mile for car experiences and 25% cut for the ride share company's deductions. You have to drive for one hour going 60 mph to earn $13.80 for one hour. Now let's see how much after additional deductions like dead miles on the return trip to my hometown and miles to get to the pick up location. For example a ride going to Oakland airport, the ride share company paid me $21 for the trip. I drove 25.6 miles to complete the trip to the airport. I had to drive another 25.6 miles back to my hometown. After deducting $.54 a mile at 52.2 miles toltal for the trip to the airport and the return trip to my hometown. I lost $6.64 so I paid to give a free ride to the rider. Is it really worth it I guess so if you need the money. Here are a few tips

Never pick up no more 5 to 7 minutes to your pick up location.
Never pick up doing heavy commute hours unless fairs are 2X for more.
Try to avoid city driving because of wear in tear on your car.
Remember When picking up during surge pricing if the rider canceled the ride you only get paid the regular cancellation fair. Not the surge fair.
DRIVERS SUBSIDISE UBER

UNSUSTAINABLE

Uber should be paying our cars and us seperately !
 

crookedhalo

Well-Known Member
Not even close for personal cars. Does it cost you $54,000 to drive a medium size sedan 100,000 miles?
That number is closer to what it costs to run a box truck.
Well, if you include the price of the vehicle, insurance, Maintenance and repairs over 5 years, that number seems kind of low
 

swingset

Well-Known Member
$.54 is realistic, that's what the government allows for tax deductions for mileage. I believe it's a lot more for car expenses. I think you better go back to school and learn your math

So, other than being bitter and wrong, do you have any other skills? Ever wash windows or pick up dog poop?

Trying to figure out where you'll fit in with this organization.
 

ShinyAndChrome

Well-Known Member
People who think our cars all cost $.54/mile to run are exactly as bad at figuring out costs to uber as those who think the only cost worth tracking is gas. Both groups are hopelessly wrong and should spend less time on uber and more educating themselves on how to understand money.

$.54 is realistic, that's what the government allows for tax deductions for mileage. I believe it's a lot more for car expenses. I think you better go back to school and learn your math
Ironic. It costs $.54/mile to run a rolls Royce phantom, does it? Just because irs lets you deduct at that rate?

My cost of operation is 11% of my revenue (fuel, oil, tires, frequent washing and vaccuming, all maintenance, insurance, et al.), before tips, before other incentives, which lower my cost of operation several percentage points. The standard mileage deduction has no bearing on actual costs. You can choose either standard deduction, or actual expenses, if higher. My actual expenses have NEVER been anywhere close to the standard deduction, and I've been logging deductible business miles since the 1970s.
your car doesn't depreciate faster with more miles?

Well, if you include the price of the vehicle, insurance, Maintenance and repairs over 5 years, that number seems kind of low
and even lower If over ten years or twenty. But what if it is over two years? Or 18 months?

$.54 is the number IRS gives so it doesn't have to put up with people's crap. It has nothing to do what what YOUR vehicle runs you. It could run you $4/mile to drive a Ferrari. It could cost you $.18/mile to drive a sentra.
 

Goduckies

Well-Known Member
Mine is 20 cents a mile for a 2012 honda civic... also, I make on average 30 plus an hour in your same market... granted I go to sf sometimes, work boosted hours and never go home at the end of a run. But I do usually drive 30 mins there and back at the beginning and end with Df on. Seems like you are doing it wrong.
 

PrestonT

Well-Known Member
I have crunch the numbers in my market Alameda county and Contra Costa County California. This is based on $0.54 per mile for car experiences and 25% cut for the ride share company's deductions. You have to drive for one hour going 60 mph to earn $13.80 for one hour. Now let's see how much after additional deductions like dead miles on the return trip to my hometown and miles to get to the pick up location. For example a ride going to Oakland airport, the ride share company paid me $21 for the trip. I drove 25.6 miles to complete the trip to the airport. I had to drive another 25.6 miles back to my hometown. After deducting $.54 a mile at 52.2 miles toltal for the trip to the airport and the return trip to my hometown. I lost $6.64 so I paid to give a free ride to the rider. Is it really worth it I guess so if you need the money. Here are a few tips

Never pick up no more 5 to 7 minutes to your pick up location.
Never pick up doing heavy commute hours unless fairs are 2X for more.
Try to avoid city driving because of wear in tear on your car.
Remember When picking up during surge pricing if the rider canceled the ride you only get paid the regular cancellation fair. Not the surge fair.

You aren't even evaluating your time. It's sad that Uber drivers have been conditioned that our time is worthless.
 

Aerodrifting

Well-Known Member
Not even close for personal cars. Does it cost you $54,000 to drive a medium size sedan 100,000 miles?
That number is closer to what it costs to run a box truck.
It could be for a new car.
Say you pay for a brand new Camry, That's 25K ish + tax etc, you end up spending 30k
1k insurance / year x 10 years, That's 10k
10k for gas, plus oil change, brake, tire etc that's easily 54000.
 

Brian G.

Well-Known Member
I laugh at cry babies complaining about miles, dead miles ect. Most rideshare cars are newer then most and after 4-5 yrs the car should be already paid for. You'll always have a car payment (not a big deal) so just factor your payment into your monthly, or yearly cost and just frigging drive and make money wtf and stop the whinning lol.
 

TonyC123

New Member
I have crunch the numbers in my market Alameda county and Contra Costa County California. This is based on $0.54 per mile for car experiences and 25% cut for the ride share company's deductions. You have to drive for one hour going 60 mph to earn $13.80 for one hour. Now let's see how much after additional deductions like dead miles on the return trip to my hometown and miles to get to the pick up location. For example a ride going to Oakland airport, the ride share company paid me $21 for the trip. I drove 25.6 miles to complete the trip to the airport. I had to drive another 25.6 miles back to my hometown. After deducting $.54 a mile at 52.2 miles toltal for the trip to the airport and the return trip to my hometown. I lost $6.64 so I paid to give a free ride to the rider. Is it really worth it I guess so if you need the money. Here are a few tips

Never pick up no more 5 to 7 minutes to your pick up location.
Never pick up doing heavy commute hours unless fairs are 2X for more.
Try to avoid city driving because of wear in tear on your car.
Remember When picking up during surge pricing if the rider canceled the ride you only get paid the regular cancellation fair. Not the surge fair.
Hum no one said anything about depreciation of your car. If you are driving your own car just ask yourself am I making enough money to buy a new car let me answer the question for you the answer is no
 
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