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How many TLC plated vehicles allowed per driver?

smittenkitten

New Member
Hello I'm new to the forum and Uber in general thanks in advance for any info:

How many vehicles am I allowed to license/plate as a TLC driver? I registered one yesterday and am buying another today. I have an LLC but would prefer not to go that route; I would rather they stay under my name. The dealer I talked to yesterday said there are only two TLC insurers and I already used Inshur, they cant be insured by the same company.

Thanks again :smiles:
 
1 car per tlc license driver/owner. And if you want to register/insurance/tlc plate cars2 or more ....you have to open a corporation/LLC so you be able to insurance/tlc plate cara, but you still will need drivers/operator with tlc license to be able to insurance tlc car,even if you open a corporation/LLC !
 

highsky

Active Member
I heard that having the car registered under LLC is a good way to protect your personal assets in case of a lawsuit. is it possible to start an LLC then transfer ownership and registration of a TLC pated car from my name to the LLC? or the diamond card and registration is none transferable?
I am trying to understand the pros and cons of having a car owned and registered under LLC vs under my name.
 

smittenkitten

New Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
So I can by a car today under the LLC name and use my TLC license to insure? (One car is already registered under my own name) Thanks again very helpful guys
 

highsky

Active Member
Personal/ LLC/ corporation plate/insurance you can't transfer to an LLC,corporation../ personal.., you have to star all over new tlc plates/insurance.....
if I have personal and I want to transfer to an LLC, I have to start allover again, and this has to be done before the 08/14 dealdine, right?
 

highsky

Active Member
This is not difficult to do, man. If you're interested, send me a PM.
I am still debating if I should do it or not, and I need to know if I would be able to do an LLC and transfer my TLC plates after the 08/14 deadline.
Some says LLC wouldn't offer and protection if I am physically driving the car, since I could be personally sued in case of an accident, they say LLC only offers protection if I plan to rent the car and not drive it myself.
 

Mr. Affinito

Well-Known Member
I am still debating if I should do it or not, and I need to know if I would be able to do an LLC and transfer my TLC plates after the 08/14 deadline.
Some says LLC wouldn't offer and protection if I am physically driving the car, since I could be personally sued in case of an accident, they say LLC only offers protection if I plan to rent the car and not drive it myself.
Never get legal or medical advice from the street. Here's educational (non-legal, non-accounting) advice for you.

An LLC protects you from anything, period, whether you are driving or just owning a car. LLC doesn't protect against things like tickets/citations, but it would protect you from civil liability associated with lawsuits, etc. (no matter who is driving). First of all, that's what insurance is for. If anyone sues the LLC, then your MAXIMUM liability is the amount that you put into the LLC. So, if you put in $5,000, then your max liability is $5,000. If you put in $2, then your MAX liability is $2. If there's ever a judgment against the LLC, then you are only responsible for $2. Start a new LLC, sell the car to that new LLC and then keep moving. The problem is that if you sell the car to another LLC, then that other LLC can't get TLC plates due to the moratorium after Tuesday.
 

highsky

Active Member
Never get legal or medical advice from the street. Here's educational (non-legal, non-accounting) advice for you.

An LLC protects you from anything, period, whether you are driving or just owning a car. LLC doesn't protect against things like tickets/citations, but it would protect you from civil liability associated with lawsuits, etc. (no matter who is driving). First of all, that's what insurance is for. If anyone sues the LLC, then your MAXIMUM liability is the amount that you put into the LLC. So, if you put in $5,000, then your max liability is $5,000. If you put in $2, then your MAX liability is $2. If there's ever a judgment against the LLC, then you are only responsible for $2. Start a new LLC, sell the car to that new LLC and then keep moving. The problem is that if you sell the car to another LLC, then that other LLC can't get TLC plates due to the moratorium after Tuesday.
Whenever there is a lawsuit, they sue both the driver and the owner of the vehicle, so if I am personally driving the car I am subject to being sued and the LLC won't protect my personal assets, I understand that there is liability insurance but the limit is 100K,
but what if you get sued for 500K?
if I am renting the car and not driving it myself then yes my personal assets are protected.
am I missing anything?
 

Mr. Affinito

Well-Known Member
Well, yes, who 'da ______ is going to sue you as a driver? I feel if you're working in your professional capacity, then you cannot face civil liability.
 

Mr. Affinito

Well-Known Member
I personally know someone who was involved in an accident as a driver and he is being sued.
Many times a person injured in a taxicab due to the driver's negligence will have substantial damages from medical bills and lost wages. Attempts to recover damages from the cab driver are often unrewarding because they personally don't have any money. Therefore, it becomes necessary to recover damages from the company that provided the cab.

In general, to recover from the taxicab company, a person who was injured in a taxi due to the driver's negligence must prove that the driver was the company's agent, servant, employee, or coparticipant in a joint venture. This can be done in several different ways:

Ownership Of Taxicab
Often the taxi company will own the taxicab itself. Generally, ownership of a negligently operated vehicle is not alone sufficient to impose liability. Therefore, the owner of a motor vehicle is not liable for damages caused when an independent contractor negligently operates it. However, this rule has been modified by statute in a number of states. These statutes make the owner of a motor vehicle liable for damages arising out of the operation of the vehicle by anyone with his permission.

Ownership of the taxi by the cab company is also relevant to establishing an agency relationship. Ownership implies possession and control, and if the company has the right to possess and control the taxicab, it has means of exercising control over the taxicab driver. Thus, if the company owns the cab and furnishes it to the driver, the driver is usually considered to be an employee rather than an independent contractor, and the company can be vicariously liable for the actions of its employees.

Hope this helps....
 

highsky

Active Member
Happened to me but insurance companies have lawyers to deal with that
of course, but what if the judge find the driver liable and the person suing was severely injured, judge issue a judgement let's say 200K, insurance will pay 100K, then lawyer will go after the driver's personal assets to collect the remaining 100k, right?
 

Mr. Affinito

Well-Known Member
of course, but what if the judge find the driver liable and the person suing was severely injured, judge issue a judgement let's say 200K, insurance will pay 100K, then lawyer will go after the driver's personal assets to collect the remaining 100k, right?
No. That's how bonds work... that's not how insurance works. Think about it. You have homeowner's insurance and there's a storm or a fire or whatever. It causes $47,000 in damage. Well, insurance pays the $47K. They don't come after you after-the-fact to collect your personal belongings.
 

Salvi

Well-Known Member
No. That's how bonds work... that's not how insurance works. Think about it. You have homeowner's insurance and there's a storm or a fire or whatever. It causes $47,000 in damage. Well, insurance pays the $47K. They don't come after you after-the-fact to collect your personal belongings.
Exactly that defeats the whole point of insurance.
 

highsky

Active Member
Exactly that defeats the whole point of insurance.
I don't agree, if you are sued and there is a judgement against you that exceeds the policy limit, the person suing you can go after your personal assets to collect the judgement, insurance won't pay a penny above the 100K limit.
 

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