How drivers are protesting Uber while making money.

Today a driver told me they asked a driver what he was paying Uber, which was a ride that would have paid Uber lots and the driver little. The passenger agreed to pay the driver half the price cash.

I read about another driver who takes the long way as this won't cost the customer any extra but will dig into Uber's cut and they will have to pay the driver more mileage.

Did anyone hear of this type of working to rule in their area?
 
Cash rides can hurt you. Uber will deactivate, your insurance may not cover you, and in some jurisdictions, it’s straight up illegal.

Selling sex and straight up prostitution is illegal, but selling a massage or an escort where sex happens between 2 consenting adults is not. Same here. If your friend buys something tangible from you and then you drive him home for a favor illegal? Who says you can't sell a stick of gum for 10 or 15 bucks, and then do them a favor by driving them to where they need to go for free?

As far as deactivation goes, so many people are fed up right now, they don't care.

It's all how you package it and exploit the loopholes....
 

Kyanar

Well-Known Member
Selling sex and straight up prostitution is illegal, but selling a massage or an escort where sex happens between 2 consenting adults is not. Same here. If your friend buys something tangible from you and then you drive him home for a favor illegal? Who says you can't sell a stick of gum for 10 or 15 bucks, and then do them a favor by driving them to where they need to go for free?

Depends how the law is written. In my state (QLD, Australia), that wouldn't fly and you would be slammed with a fine for up to 160 penalty units (a penalty unit is ~$150 each) for providing a taxi service in a vehicle that isn't a taxi. But then we also ban leaving litter in Uber vehicles .
 

The Gift of Fish

Well-Known Member
Today a driver told me they asked a driver what he was paying Uber, which was a ride that would have paid Uber lots and the driver little. The passenger agreed to pay the driver half the price cash.

I read about another driver who takes the long way as this won't cost the customer any extra but will dig into Uber's cut and they will have to pay the driver more mileage.

Did anyone hear of this type of working to rule in their area?
"Working to rule" means following official working rules to the letter. Accepting cash payments from pax and longhauling are obviously not part of Uber's official rules for drivers.
 
I believe Robert Kraft would disagree with you.
I don't know the details of the case, but he most likely offered money for sex not company or a massage.
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"Working to rule" means following official working rules to the letter. Accepting cash payments from pax and longhauling are obviously not part of Uber's official rules for drivers.
Uber is charging pax surge rates and hiding the surges from the drivers. The less respect Uber has for the Driver and Passengers by pulling this crap, the less their "rules" are going to be respected.

 

CDP

Well-Known Member
Selling sex and straight up prostitution is illegal, but selling a massage or an escort where sex happens between 2 consenting adults is not. Same here. If your friend buys something tangible from you and then you drive him home for a favor illegal? Who says you can't sell a stick of gum for 10 or 15 bucks, and then do them a favor by driving them to where they need to go for free?

As far as deactivation goes, so many people are fed up right now, they don't care.

It's all how you package it and exploit the loopholes....
Stick of gum = 15$ and you get a gram of sticky icky in DC. Same principle.
 

Ignatowski

Active Member
Uber/Lyft say that you can't advertise (with trade dress) as Uber/Lyft, and then take pax for cash... fair enough. But if you remove all trade dress, can you take pax for cash? You might say that would be providing an unlicensed taxi service, but remember that Uber/Lyft say that they don't actually provide a taxi service.

According to Uber/Lyft, they basically just run a database of Users, a bit like an online dating service. Some Users in the database are willing to provide transportation; and some Users want a ride; and Uber/Lyft give you "the hook-up." They also provide a payment system, and take their "platform fee." Or at-least, "that's their story, and they're sticking with it."

There are rideshare apps which do use cash payments: check out LibreTaxi, which is also "a platform" to hook-up drivers and riders, except the rider pays the driver directly.

Now, all that said, my own city (Minneapolis) has given Uber and Lyft "licenses to operate" inside the city. I read the license, and large portions were cut-and-paste from taxi licenses: the city requires car inspections; background checks, trade dress, specific parking rules, liability insurance. Clearly, the city would not welcome something like LibreTaxi, which does not do any of that. The truth is that the city regulates Lyft & Uber as if they ARE taxi companies, even while Lyft and Uber's very business model depends on them claiming to be "just an online platform." There is some legal slight-of-hand going on here.

So the real reason you can't take cash is that your CITY already views you as a part of a taxi service, which they regulate. If your small city doesn't regulate taxi companies, or you are working outside city limits, and if you have commercial taxi/chauffer car insurance, and you pay your taxes for your business receipts, then I think removing your Uber/Lyft trade dress and accepting street hails & cash is legit. There are probably a million owner/operator "limo" services in rural America which are not regulated by any city. I used to live in a town of 12,000 people, and there was a transportation service called "Leo's Van"... one guy with a van and a cell phone. Unless the city council decided to regulate Leo, I'd bet that he could take street hails and cash.
 
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Kyanar

Well-Known Member
Yeah so that’s basically the case in my state (in Australia, cities don’t get to regulate to this level, states do). The government created a category of license called “booked hire service”, and declared that Uber, Ola et al are booked hire services.

To transport a passenger through an app, you’re a booked hire service and you need the right class of compulsory insurance, a more expensive vehicle registration, an industry authority (license endorsement for rideshare and taxi), and a vehicle license. You also have to be engaged through a booking entity such as Uber, unless you have a booking entity authorisation as well. Naturally, every single one of these things is $$$.

If you pick up someone on a hail from the side of the road that’s even worse, unless your vehicle has taxi plates (about $100k each)
 

Stevie The magic Unicorn

Well-Known Member
Uber/Lyft say that you can't advertise (with trade dress) as Uber/Lyft, and then take pax for cash... fair enough. But if you remove all trade dress, can you take pax for cash? You might say that would be providing an unlicensed taxi service, but remember that Uber/Lyft say that they don't actually provide a taxi service.

According to Uber/Lyft, they basically just run a database of Users, a bit like an online dating service. Some Users in the database are willing to provide transportation; and some Users want a ride; and Uber/Lyft give you "the hook-up." They also provide a payment system, and take their "platform fee." Or at-least, "that's their story, and they're sticking with it."

There are rideshare apps which do use cash payments: check out LibreTaxi, which is also "a platform" to hook-up drivers and riders, except the rider pays the driver directly.

Now, all that said, my own city (Minneapolis) has given Uber and Lyft "licenses to operate" inside the city. I read the license, and large portions were cut-and-paste from taxi licenses: the city requires car inspections; background checks, trade dress, specific parking rules, liability insurance. Clearly, the city would not welcome something like LibreTaxi, which does not do any of that. The truth is that the city regulates Lyft & Uber as if they ARE taxi companies, even while Lyft and Uber's very business model depends on them claiming to be "just an online platform." There is some legal slight-of-hand going on here.

So the real reason you can't take cash is that your CITY already views you as a part of a taxi service, which they regulate. If your small city doesn't regulate taxi companies, or you are working outside city limits, and if you have commercial taxi/chauffer car insurance, and you pay your taxes for your business receipts, then I think removing your Uber/Lyft trade dress and accepting street hails & cash is legit. There are probably a million owner/operator "limo" services in rural America which are not regulated by any city. I used to live in a town of 12,000 people, and there was a transportation service called "Leo's Van"... one guy with a van and a cell phone. Unless the city council decided to regulate Leo, I'd bet that he could take street hails and cash.

You would be surprised how easy that is to do.

What i have been tempted to do is to get black car insurance and slap and uber/lyft stucker on the car with a "for-hire" dome light and take street hails.

We all know that people are dumb enough to street hail and uber, might as well have the proper insurance.


I figure if i do that i can get 40%+ more than uber/lyft, 3X-4X as much on short trips (in the $9.00-10.00 range)


There's nothing to stop you and having uber/lyft stickers will protect you from much of the enforcement.
 

oldfart

Well-Known Member
As I see it the problem with doing off app rides is the insurance. My personal auto won’t cover me if I’m doing commercial work and of course Uber won’t cover me because the app is off

So I bought commercial insurance and I got the local permits. I can’t do street hails but I can do pre arranged rides

The insurance is, I think, expensive but given the number of miles I drive less than a penny a mile. The permits themselves are cheap
 
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