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How do I put down Uber and Lyft for my resume?

Urbanappalachian

Active Member
I'm trying to get a career or "real job" going while still doing the gig jobs on the side.

How should I put it down on the resume? Is 3 years of driving with Uber and Lyft enough or must I go back 5 years of work history?
 

Urbanappalachian

Active Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
What if those past work history is obsolete meaning the business could not be reached or be verified?

That would appear as if one made up a company and supposed work history within that company, that never happened...

Isn't 3 years standard since it isn't too far from the past?

You don’t! Just use your regular work history. Go back as many years as you think it will help. Ten would be a good number if you’re old enough.
 

SFOspeedracer

Well-Known Member
What if those past work history is obsolete meaning the business could not be reached or be verified?

That would appear as if one made up a company and supposed work history within that company, that never happened...

Isn't 3 years standard since it isn't too far from the past?
Not necessarily, In a professional setting, ten years is a a good enough backtrack. And if for some reason you do not have reachable contact info for the company, you don’t have to always add a phone number or email. Just state the company you worked for and what you did, and explain if they ask to be able to reach them to verify any credentials. I also suggest tailoring your resume to fit what the job you are looking for needs. Even though I personally would not add Uber or Lyft to a professional resume, if you were looking for something for example .. in the realm of customer service, you could tailor it to center around the “service” you provided riders who entered and exited your vehicle. Most companies will not go out of their way to find an unreachable company you listed, unless you show obvious red flags for falsification of your resume
 

25rides7daysaweek

Well-Known Member
Although I've never had a resume, they are calling us independent contractors.
I must be in a pretty good market and
do a good job at this though.
With just high school education
any job I might be applying for
would most likely result in a pay cut..
 

SFOspeedracer

Well-Known Member
I'm including it on my resume because I don't want to show any gaps in employment. I figured out a way to word it that makes it sound somewhat respectable, playing up the "entrepreneurial" aspect.
For some jobs that makes sense to do, a gap in employment is definitely an eyebrow raiser for most interviewers

Sadly, if this user was pursuing employment in a quaternary sector or similar, even for something entry level, Lyft or Uber on a resume would throw the unemployable/can’t take you seriously flag up. This is a constant topic in my office, as most professionals deem ridesharing or anything in the gig economy the same value they deem a burger flipper at McDonald’s. While I don’t agree with that way of thinking, since there are plenty of professionals I know, including myself, who do side work .. it’s just something that most professionals, especially those who sit you down to interview in substantial paying corporations think
 

oldnavyht3

New Member
Independent Contractor Transportation Network Company: Uber/Lyft LLC
  • Provide transportation and customer service to various clients maintaining a 4.9-5.0 rating.
  • maintain vehicle expenses, maintenance and mileage reports on spreadsheets for safety and taxes.
  • Problem solve with clients and negotiate issues.
  • Serve as an interface between the client and the parent company.
That is how I word it on my resume to cover gaps and to let the interviewer/recruiter know I am not just sitting around waiting on unemployment checks to roll in I am at least doing something.
 

nouberipo

Well-Known Member
I'm trying to get a career or "real job" going while still doing the gig jobs on the side.

How should I put it down on the resume? Is 3 years of driving with Uber and Lyft enough or must I go back 5 years of work history?
I wouldn't put it down on my resume as it will be telling them that you are willing to work for below minimum wages which will obviously hurt your wage negotiations. Also, Uber drivers are not looked at well in the US at least so proceed at your own peril
 

rkozy

Well-Known Member
I'm including it on my resume because I don't want to show any gaps in employment. I figured out a way to word it that makes it sound somewhat respectable, playing up the "entrepreneurial" aspect.
You are essentially running your own business as an U/L driver. If you can explain to a prospective employer that you fully understand the concepts of maximizing income stream and eliminating overhead, you will impress the Hell out of them during an interview.
 

oldnavyht3

New Member
well hopefully rideshare isnt the only thing you have on your resume if you want to put it
Post automatically merged:

You are essentially running your own business as an U/L driver. If you can explain to a prospective employer that you fully understand the concepts of maximizing income stream and eliminating overhead, you will impress the Hell out of them during an interview.
PREACH!!!
 

MadTownUberD

The Trendy Transporter
Moderator
What if those past work history is obsolete meaning the business could not be reached or be verified?

That would appear as if one made up a company and supposed work history within that company, that never happened...

Isn't 3 years standard since it isn't too far from the past?
I have participated in screening resumes and interviewing candidates for technical positions at the company I currently work for. If there is a gap on the resume, it doesn't necessarily disqualify the candidate as long as there was an explanation. Maybe don't put Uber or Lyft on the resume but you can bring it up in the interview after you've told everyone about your wonderful work experience.

For example, one time we interviewed a guy with a significant gap on his resume. His explanation was cheesy... He said he was a full-time volunteer scout leader. Now I've been a scout leader, and it's a lot of work, but unless you're getting paid for it you shouldn't be putting in 40 hours doing it .... Maybe 20. He also had some cheesy action words on his resume that he kept repeating, and when we asked him details he was a bit fuzzy.... like someone wrote his resume for him. We did not hire him.

I wouldn't worry about the company you worked for no longer being in business. I have a pretty good sense of when someone is telling the truth, so as long as someone is being truthful to me and their explanation makes sense I am fine with it.
 

ZenUber

Well-Known Member
If it’s an unskilled job you could include Uber. Otherwise don’t put any work experience that’s not relevant to the position. Better to have the gap, or come up with something else to fill the gap.
 

SFOspeedracer

Well-Known Member
You are essentially running your own business as an U/L driver. If you can explain to a prospective employer that you fully understand the concepts of maximizing income stream and eliminating overhead, you will impress the Hell out of them during an interview.
that’s a good way to word it to a reasonable employer
 

Matt Uterak

Well-Known Member
What if those past work history is obsolete meaning the business could not be reached or be verified?

That would appear as if one made up a company and supposed work history within that company, that never happened...

Isn't 3 years standard since it isn't too far from the past?
Plenty of companies go out of business.

I’ve put down companies that no longer operate on my resume —- I should note I’ve been with my current employer for 15 years.
 
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