How are riders not making much?

Ubergoober6

Active Member
I'm not bragging nor putting anyone down, I'm just skeptical on how a few people on here claim they don't make much driving for Uber. I don't live in a big city and yet I still average $12-$20 per hour driving. I do have my fair share of down time but I still average out as much as a warehouse worker makes.
 

Disgusted Driver

Well-Known Member
Welcome new member. There are many threads about the actual cost of driving for rideshare and it aint just gas and pixie dust. You also say you make an "average $12-$20" which is a heck of a range and tells me you probably don't know what you are really earning or account for all of your time.

It's also how and when you drive that matters. I can tell you I make $30 an hour driving and prove it If I only go out from 1:50AM to 2:50AM Friday and Saturday night. If you drive during the day, in most places, it's slim pickings and lots of competition.

There is also the possibility that Uber gives newer drivers a little more action to get them hooked.

Bottom line is that at some of the rates across the country, 50 to 60 cents a mile, it's mathematically impossible to make a lot. What is your mileage and minute rate?
 

Ubergoober6

Active Member
Welcome new member. There are many threads about the actual cost of driving for rideshare and it aint just gas and pixie dust. You also say you make an "average $12-$20" which is a heck of a range and tells me you probably don't know what you are really earning or account for all of your time.

It's also how and when you drive that matters. I can tell you I make $30 an hour driving and prove it If I only go out from 1:50AM to 2:50AM Friday and Saturday night. If you drive during the day, in most places, it's slim pickings and lots of competition.

There is also the possibility that Uber gives newer drivers a little more action to get them hooked.

Bottom line is that at some of the rates across the country, 50 to 60 cents a mile, it's mathematically impossible to make a lot. What is your mileage and minute rate?
Today I averaged $10 per hour and that's only because I left myself online and declined 3 rides on a half hour drive home. Its 0.8250 cents per mile, and 15 cents per minute where I drive.
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
I'm not bragging nor putting anyone down, I'm just skeptical on how a few people on here claim they don't make much driving for Uber. I don't live in a big city and yet I still average $12-$20 per hour driving. I do have my fair share of down time but I still average out as much as a warehouse worker makes.
 

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Disgusted Driver

Well-Known Member
Today I averaged $10 per hour and that's only because I left myself online and declined 3 rides on a half hour drive home. Its 0.8250 cents per mile, and 15 cents per minute where I drive.

What does $10 mean? How much you got from Uber or what you actually earned after expenses? How many miles driven including dead miles? What deos it cost you to operate your vehicle per mile?
 
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chitown73

Well-Known Member
I'm not bragging nor putting anyone down, I'm just skeptical on how a few people on here claim they don't make much driving for Uber. I don't live in a big city and yet I still average $12-$20 per hour driving. I do have my fair share of down time but I still average out as much as a warehouse worker makes.
So you say that you still average out as much as a warehouse worker makes huh? Well there's one big difference..that warehouse worker probably has benefits that you'll never get driving for Uber. And that warehouse worker doesn't have to worry about his hourly average pay going up and down each day.
 

ShinyAndChrome

Well-Known Member
Today I averaged $10 per hour and that's only because I left myself online and declined 3 rides on a half hour drive home. Its 0.8250 cents per mile, and 15 cents per minute where I drive.
$10/hour? Already less than the $12-20.

How many miles did you drive in that $10? What do your miles cost? I didn't ask what gas costs. I ask what your per mile expense is.

So you say that you still average out as much as a warehouse worker makes huh? Well there's one big difference..that warehouse worker probably has benefits that you'll never get driving for Uber. And that warehouse worker doesn't have to worry about his hourly average pay going up and down each day.
Also the fact the warehouse worker ACTUALLY makes $12-20/hour, not "$12-20 hour before expenses, and some hours are much slower".
 
that's not much, You have to take into account

- Gas refills
- Wear on the car

In the end you end up with pennies if you aren't hustling and grinding hard daily

Sometimes public transportation is better for people and the requests are gonna be really slow consistently in a row

I've had really slow days for like 2 days in a row, weekends overall I'd do about 90-130 rides
 

IMMA DRIVER

Well-Known Member
How come when it comes to Uber Drivers we always factor in gas, maintanence, wear and tear, etc....
But we don't factor in gas, wear and tear, maintanence, travel expense, co-worker baby shower gifts, co-worker birthday presents, bosses Christmas present, co-worker Christmas presents, lunch fares, after hours cocktails and all other expenses that normal 9-5 workers generally dish out?
 

Trafficat

Well-Known Member
How come when it comes to Uber Drivers we always factor in gas, maintanence, wear and tear, etc....
But we don't factor in gas, wear and tear, maintanence, travel expense, co-worker baby shower gifts, co-worker birthday presents, bosses Christmas present, co-worker Christmas presents, lunch fares, after hours cocktails and all other expenses that normal 9-5 workers generally dish out?
Because those expenses are tiny by comparison. Your expenses could be 50%+ of your revenue with Uber.

Let's compare $12/hr Uber revenue to $12/hr day job.

You aren't spending 50% of your revenue at your day job just from commuting and buying baby shower gifts. Heck I never bought a gift for a coworker or boss before. Never bought a drink either or eaten out for lunch at work either.

Commuting 30 miles per day means even at IRS rates rounded down to 50 cents a mile, subtract ~$15 from your income that day. So you make $96 as a warehouse worker at $12/hr, you still profit $81.

Plus take the bus to work and home for your warehouse job and that might be only $2 for the commute... now your profit is $96-4=$92.

Now for Uber, make $96... You probably drove 150 miles to get that. Assume same IRS rates, and that's 150-96 = $21 profit. Thus Uber take home is about a quarter of the warehouse job if 50 cent per mile is used.

Of course it won't really be that bad because a typical driver is not so likely to have 50 cents a mile in expenses.. but at any expense rate, the costs will be much higher when you drive much more.

At a more realistic $0.30 per mile cost, $96 revenue with 150 miles on the odo is better, but still only $51 profit compared to $87 warehouse job commuting. So at 30 cents a mile you still make 70% more with the warehouse job with the same revenue.

At $0.20 per mile cost it would be $66 profit with Uber, and you probably aren't doing much better than that... compared to $90 warehouse job commuting. Still 35% more profit with the warehouse job.

Heck you could take a $20 uber ride to work and back and still come out ahead maybe. $96-$40=$56... better than the Uber driver w/ a $0.30 per mile cost that drove 150 miles to make $96. Make 10% more by using Uber as a service to get to your $12/hr job than making $12/hr as an Uber driver.

Clearly, $12/hr at a warehouse job is MUCH better than $12/hr for Uber revenue.
 
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Because those expenses are tiny by comparison. Your expenses could be 50%+ of your revenue with Uber.

Let's compare $12/hr Uber revenue to $12/hr day job

You aren't spending 50% of your revenue at your day job just from commuting and buying baby shower gifts. Heck I never bought a gift for a coworker or boss before. Never bought a drink either or eaten out for lunch at work either.

Commuting 30 miles per day means even at IRS rates rounded down to 50 cents a mile, subtract ~$15 from your income that day. So you make $96 as a warehouse worker at $12/hr, you still profit $81.

Plus take the bus to work and home for your warehouse job and that might be only $2 for the commute... now your profit is $96-4=$92.

Now for Uber, make $96... You probably drove 150 miles to get that. Assume same IRS rates, and that's 150-96 = $21 profit. Thus Uber take home is about a quarter of the warehouse job if 50 cent per mile is used.

Of course it won't really be that bad because a typical driver is not so likely to have 50 cents a mile in expenses.. but at any expense rate, the costs will be much higher when you drive much more.

At a more realistic $0.30 per mile cost, $96 revenue with 150 miles on the odo is better, but still only $51 profit compared to $87 warehouse job commuting. So at 30 cents a mile you still make 70% more with the warehouse job with the same revenue.

At $0.20 per mile cost it would be $66 profit with Uber, and you probably aren't doing much better than that... compared to $90 warehouse job commuting. Still 35% more profit with the warehouse job.

Heck you could take a $20 uber ride to work and back and still come out ahead maybe. $96-$40=$56... better than the Uber driver w/ a $0.30 per mile cost that drove 150 miles to make $96. Make 10% more by using Uber as a service to get to your $12/hr job than making $12/hr as an Uber driver.

Clearly, $12/hr at a warehouse job is MUCH better than $12/hr for Uber revenue.

Please post this in the miami forum. A lot of people dont understand what their cost is and you sir said it in a way everyone can comprehend.
 

Friendly Jack

Well-Known Member
So you say that you still average out as much as a warehouse worker makes huh? Well there's one big difference..that warehouse worker probably has benefits that you'll never get driving for Uber. And that warehouse worker doesn't have to worry about his hourly average pay going up and down each day.
...and that warehouse worker doesn't have to provide a piece of equipment costing several thousand dollars (a car) as a requirement to get the job.
 

NHDriver

Well-Known Member
and the warehouse worker gets paid time off and holiday pay and better quality of life in general. You don't drive, you don't get paid and is not fighting traffic and bad weather to perform his/her job in the warehouse.
 

bsliv

Well-Known Member
If one could work the warehouse job when and for how long they desire, tnc's might see a driver shortage. The value of the flexibility is incalculable. The standard mileage deduction can be a benefit for those that have a tax liability from other jobs (if their cost to drive is low enough and their tax rate is high enough).

Riding in a car is the most dangerous activity most of us engage in. Drivers can lose more than the insurance deductible at any moment.
 

Buddywannarideagain

Well-Known Member
If one could work the warehouse job when and for how long they desire, tnc's might see a driver shortage. The value of the flexibility is incalculable. The standard mileage deduction can be a benefit for those that have a tax liability from other jobs (if their cost to drive is low enough and their tax rate is high enough).

Riding in a car is the most dangerous activity most of us engage in. Drivers can lose more than the insurance deductible at any moment.
I’ve had 5 close calls as far as car accidents in 1.5 years. You’re right. One of these days it’s not gonna be close - it’s gonna be a real crash. I’ve also had one near assault.
 

PrestonT

Well-Known Member
I'm not bragging nor putting anyone down, I'm just skeptical on how a few people on here claim they don't make much driving for Uber. I don't live in a big city and yet I still average $12-$20 per hour driving. I do have my fair share of down time but I still average out as much as a warehouse worker makes.

If you consider $12 to $20 before considerable expenses to be great pay, you've hit the jackpot!
 

brianboru

Well-Known Member
Today I averaged $10 per hour and that's only because I left myself online and declined 3 rides on a half hour drive home. Its 0.8250 cents per mile, and 15 cents per minute where I drive.

Are you saying you netted $10 per hour or grossed $10 per hour?
 

ShinyAndChrome

Well-Known Member
Because those expenses are tiny by comparison. Your expenses could be 50%+ of your revenue with Uber.

Let's compare $12/hr Uber revenue to $12/hr day job.

You aren't spending 50% of your revenue at your day job just from commuting and buying baby shower gifts. Heck I never bought a gift for a coworker or boss before. Never bought a drink either or eaten out for lunch at work either.

Commuting 30 miles per day means even at IRS rates rounded down to 50 cents a mile, subtract ~$15 from your income that day. So you make $96 as a warehouse worker at $12/hr, you still profit $81.

Plus take the bus to work and home for your warehouse job and that might be only $2 for the commute... now your profit is $96-4=$92.

Now for Uber, make $96... You probably drove 150 miles to get that. Assume same IRS rates, and that's 150-96 = $21 profit. Thus Uber take home is about a quarter of the warehouse job if 50 cent per mile is used.

Of course it won't really be that bad because a typical driver is not so likely to have 50 cents a mile in expenses.. but at any expense rate, the costs will be much higher when you drive much more.

At a more realistic $0.30 per mile cost, $96 revenue with 150 miles on the odo is better, but still only $51 profit compared to $87 warehouse job commuting. So at 30 cents a mile you still make 70% more with the warehouse job with the same revenue.

At $0.20 per mile cost it would be $66 profit with Uber, and you probably aren't doing much better than that... compared to $90 warehouse job commuting. Still 35% more profit with the warehouse job.

Heck you could take a $20 uber ride to work and back and still come out ahead maybe. $96-$40=$56... better than the Uber driver w/ a $0.30 per mile cost that drove 150 miles to make $96. Make 10% more by using Uber as a service to get to your $12/hr job than making $12/hr as an Uber driver.

Clearly, $12/hr at a warehouse job is MUCH better than $12/hr for Uber revenue.
And let's not forget, an uber gig results in very little payroll tax due to mileage deduction. Payroll includes social security:

https://www.fool.com/retirement/general/2014/08/02/how-are-social-security-benefits-calculated.aspx

The size of your monthly Social Security check when you retire will depend largely on how much you earned and how much you paid in Social Security tax during your working years...The biggest factor in how much you will receive in Social Security benefits is how much you earned while you were working.

So not only does uber suck as a main job but then when you hit retirement age your SS benefits are even more terrible than they are for the rest of us.

As a full time job (oh and it has no benefits) it is a terrible, terrible idea. Terrible idea. Terrible.
 
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