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Hospital tries to get rid of patient by calling Uber

Discussion in 'Stories' started by MacAngus, Jan 10, 2019.

  1. MacAngus

    MacAngus

    Location:
    Lutz
    Unbelievable that a health care facility would call for a rideshare in an attempt to get rid of a patient they don't want. Isn't this illegal?

     
  2. Another Uber Driver

    Another Uber Driver Moderator

    Location:
    See avatar
    Driving:
    UberTAXI
    WELCOME TO MY WORLD!

    For years, any establishment that did not want someone on the premises would dump the "problem" on a cab driver. It makes sense that in this age of TNCs, they now dump the "problem" on a TNC driver.

    It worked out in the video just as it usually works out in reality.

    You get the "problem" in your car and you can not get the "problem" OUT of your car.

    You pick up the guy, he is right there when the people put him into the cab, pay you and tell you to take him to_______________. As soon as you get moving, he suddenly does not want to go to___________________________. He gets argumentative and it is downhill from there. It took me once to learn what to do with these "dump" jobs.

    If it is a bar, hotel or restaurant that is trying to dump a drunk on you, you tell them to call the police. The police are trained to handle obnoxious drunks. Cab, limousine and TNC drivers are not. Of course, they do not want the drunk "to have any trouble". It is funny how they do not care if the DRIVER has "any trouble".

    Hospitals are a bit different. I will haul those, but only under certain conditions. If it is the cab:

    When they put the person into the cab and hand me a voucher or want to pay up front, I ask them where I am supposed to take him. I then verify with the person whom I am hauling that this is where he wants to go. If he confirms it, I make it clear to him that there will be no changes in destination once I start to move. This usually makes the hospital people somewhat unhappy which often results in various accusatory questions directed at me. I simply tell them that this is "bitter experience" and I am going to make sure that the "problem" that they are dumping on me is not going to be a "problem" for me. I call it what it is. They do not like it, but too bad. I will make it quite clear to all involved that if there is any destination change en route; any argument or any other trouble, this person that the hospital is trying to dump on me is coming right back to said hospital. I make it clear to the passenger that I am being paid to take him from hospital to point B. There will be no stops en route and no changes. If he wants me to take him somewhere else once we arrive at point B, I will do so, provided that he demonstrates that he has the means to pay me.

    If the hospital is trying to get me to take him to some establishment for the homeless that is going to pay me when I get him there, that does not happen, It took only once for me to get a homeless person to such an establishment. It took twenty minutes to find someone with whom I could discuss this. He knew nothing about it nor did he know who the person was whose name I had who was supposed to see to it that I got paid. I have had go-rounds with hospital personnel over that. NO pay on the other end.

    Uber and Lyft, of course, by their very nature, have eliminated the question of getting paid, provided, of course, that you take the passenger to the destination shown on the screen. Still, as happened to this driver and often happens and has happened in these types of situations, suddenly, the passenger does not want to go where the person who ordered the ride tells you to take him. The mistake of the driver in the video was that he actually moved a wheel. As soon as he opened the trip, the passenger became argumentative. I would have put him out of the car right there and told him to go back inside and straighten it out with the people at the hospital and have them order another ride for him. Fortunately, the driver came partially to his senses and took the guy back to the hospital. He did not have to get out of the car to go inside. He should have told the passenger simply to get out of the car, go back inside and straighten out the matter. If the passenger balked (and it looks like he might have balked), the driver might have wasted his time going back inside, as odds are that security personnel or front desk personnel would not know too much about the passenger. I might have done what the driver did, but, if I did, I would invite the front desk to send someone out to the car to deal with him or I would call the police and THEY could deal with him.
     
    mrpjfresh and Pax Collector like this.
  3. Merc7186

    Merc7186

    Location:
    Buffalo NY
    Driving:
    UberXL
    RakosRakos listens to classical music???
     
  4. MacAngus

    MacAngus

    Location:
    Lutz
    Haha, you'd be surprised how choice of music can make for a serene, peaceful ride. :)

    Thank for the tips, comes in handy no doubt for others who may experience the same issues. This country is in need of some serious mental health care reform. Remember the term, Ship of Fools? That's what Europe did to it's mental cases, round them up and ship them out to places like Australia and the Americas. We Rideshare drivers are becoming Ships of Fools, in more senses than one.
     
    Rakos likes this.
  5. It's not illegal as long as the patient has been cleared by the doctor. You have to understand that some patients are homeless and want to stay at the facility as long as they can even without a medical need. Unfortunately, hospitals aren't homeless shelters and they need to get everyone going after their procedure is done.

    As far as the transportation option for the patient, some call a cab and others hail an Uber.
     
    Rakos likes this.
  6. MacAngus

    MacAngus

    Location:
    Lutz
    Thanks for the reply. I'm not an attorney, maybe someone who is can weigh in on this because apparently it is illegal to do so. I just googled and found out US Commission on Civil Rights prohibits "patient dumping" and Congress has enacted laws to prevent this from happening. Then the question is, from a law perspective, can a Rideshare be abetting and breaking the law? In any case, I think it best to cancel such rides if you ever come across them for now. We can refuse to sanction lawbreaking activities.
     
  7. What exactly is illegal to do here? Once a patient has been cleared by a medical doctor, they got to go. Period. Hospitals and doctors take a huge liability in doing so. By law, they're required to treat anyone and everyone that has a medical emergency or in labor regardless of their ability to pay or not. As far as patients that over stay without the need, there is no law against that as long as all medical procedures have been followed.

    I think you're getting a little paranoid here. You're simply a driver. You're not aiding or abetting anything.

    P.S. I know this because I've worked at a county hospital for a while.
     
  8. Why did he have devil horns and why wasn't he wearing a seat-belt? I also don't understand what was lost in translation. If you aren't paying for the ride; you're not riding for free. You aren't going to go where you want. If you want to, pull out your wallet and pay. Give an address of where your 'friends live'.
     
  9. SuzeCB

    SuzeCB

    Location:
    NJ
    Driving:
    UberX
    The problem comes in when the patient is NOT well, but is being signed out by the hospital because of no insurance or insurance is won't approve payment for the treatment. Then the same patient that the hospital just tried to get approved for a 3 day stay of tests and treatment is miraculously "cured" and signed out to be dumped on the streets.

    Happens to the mentally ill ALL the time. Sometimes the hospitals even put them on buses to another state, trying to not get caught violating the law.
     
  10. MacAngus likes this.
  11. SuzeCB

    SuzeCB

    Location:
    NJ
    Driving:
    UberX
    The Netflix show "Orange is the New Black" dealt with this, as well...

    An older inmate with no family, serving a (at least functional) life sentence, developed dementia. Rather than caring for her in a nursing care unit, they released her, in the middle of the night, onto city streets, and had the nerve to call it "Compassionate Release".

    Yes, it's a show. One born out of a book written by the real life main characters about her time in prison and what it, and subsequently investigation taught her about our broken system.

    If you're poor, unwell, and helpless, don't worry... someone will be by real soon to kick you.
     
    MacAngus likes this.
  12. SEAL Team 5

    SEAL Team 5

    Location:
    Phoenix
    Driving:
    Livery
    Unbelievable that you think he was a patient. He wasn't wearing any hospital wristband ID. Homeboy wanted a free ride over Tampa Bay to St Petersburg.
     
  13. Standard operating procedure,

    The cab company here has contracts with the hospitals to get rid of their patients they don't want around anymore.

    This has been going on for a long time.
     
    MacAngus likes this.
  14. mrpjfresh

    mrpjfresh

    Location:
    Asheville, NC
    Driving:
    UberX
    I get that this situation kind of snuck up on the driver, but having him say the account name or the driver's name from the start would have clarified this situation upfront. The verification process is there for a reason and I think it is a safe assumption this rider would have failed it. Drivers should discern as much as they can about a rider - their identity, what they are carrying, their level of sobriety, etc - before even unlocking their doors, in my opinion, but certainly before moving your wheels.

    I think the advice Another Uber DriverAnother Uber Driver gave should be mandatory reading for all drivers. Third party rides (ie: dump jobs, good Samaritan rides) can be some of the worst you'll ever give, in my experience. The single piece of advice to remember, if nothing else, is to confirm the destination with both parties (rider and account holder) and if there is any drama, disagreement, the rider is unresponsive, DO NOT TAKE THE RIDE!

    I don't know about the abetting issue and liability. I always was uneasy about transporting someone against their will when these third party riders flip out and demand to be taken elsewhere or even worse, back to the bar. I think the best policy is avoiding this legal can of worms and ride refusal but each driver needs to make up their own mind.

    Bartenders and hospital staff will get mad when you tell them "this is a me problem, not a we problem" but who cares? Uber certainly doesn't pay enough to deal with this. Besides, they'll probably just keep ordering until another driver takes the ride. Isn't it just wonderful when you can push a button and be rid of a problem for a few bucks?
     
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  15. Another Uber Driver

    Another Uber Driver Moderator

    Location:
    See avatar
    Driving:
    UberTAXI
    It is not just yours, it is mine and more than a few cab drivers with whom I have worked over the years. As a company official, I ran into it, as well. In The Capital of Your Nation, we have an oversupply of busybody do-gooders (do you need any in North Carolina? We could ship a few to you.............................). Ninety-five per-cent of those jobs are nothing but TROUBLE.


    (emphasis added)


    The emphasised part is why the third party rides are "some of the worst that you will ever give", As quoted poster states, if take one of those jobs you must, confirm everything with BOTH parties. Ask questions. If you do not receive the answer that you want even to one of your questions, DO NOT take the trip. Let some ant run it. This is why they have ants.


    They do. They want the problem away from them, off of them with someone else an onto someone else. They do not care, as long as it is gone from them. I often ask why they do not call the police, as the police are trained to deal with these sorts of problems. The reply is always something on the order of "We don't want him to have any trouble." :Funny, you do not seem to give a damn if I have 'trouble', but you do not want HIM to have "trouble'.

    UBER does not pay enough? CAB RATES do not even pay enough for me to want to deal with someone else's "problem". Further, neither I nor ninety-seven per-cent of TNC drivers are trained in dealing with "problem" people. The police are.

    Let them keep ordering. They have ants for a reason.


    Is it not JUST? In the old days, these people used to have to dial seven digits and wait for someone to answer then take the order, then, they had to wait for the cab to arrive. In some cases, they had to go out onto the street and put up the hand. Now, all that you need do is push a button.

    As for the cost, given all of the inconsistent taxes, charges and fees that Uber adds to the bill, the cost of the UberX is not as much less than a cab as it used to be. Still, now you can dump your "problem" on someone else and you can actually see when your "problem taker-awayer" is actually going to arrive. As you so correctly state, if "problem taker-awayer" Number One will not do it, you just order another one until someone will. The ants will come through, eventually.
     
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