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Honking with pax in car - yes or no

Do you honk with pax in the car?

  • Yes

    Votes: 63 75.0%
  • No

    Votes: 21 25.0%

  • Total voters
    84

MadTownUberD

The Trendy Transporter
Moderator
Ever since my wife's work schedule changed, I've been driving afternoon/evening rush hour instead of early mornings. This is probably the worst time to drive but so be it.

I used to avoid honking because I didn't want to shatter the peaceful calm of my pax's environment. Lately however I've been getting more and more confident about honking at other cars who "misbehave" while I am on trip with (a) pax. I don't get obnoxious or engage in road rage; I just send messages to other drivers to stay in their lane, etc.

Many of you know that I'm one of those weirdos who cares about ratings. I've found no effect on ratings. In fact pax might even appreciate it, i.e. perceive that I am doing everything in my power to get them where they are going quickly and safely.

Regardless of effect on ratings, do you honk with pax in the car? I'm sure many of you don't care about ratings, but I'm not sure it even has an effect. I'd love to hear thoughts, stories, and advice for new drivers.
 

Christinebitg

Well-Known Member
I give them a grace period to account for the red light runners I didn't see. Intersections are no joke.
Yes, how long I wait depends on the circumstances. Typically two or three seconds, as this is mostly daytime driving for me, and knowing that here in the South, we're pretty tolerant of people who aren't paying attention at traffic lights.

I've seen times when drivers would sit through an entire light, if the person in front of them wasn't paying attention. I normally wouldn't wait that long, though. Especially if I was on a trip with a rider in the car.
 

oldfart

Well-Known Member
The reason to honk is to announce your presence. Not clear a path, For example

, if someone is backing out of a parking lot and dosent see me in the way , honk

If someone is changing lanes but I’m in that lane, in his path, honk

An exception is the guy texting at a red light. And dosent see that the light is now green. Give him a little beep-beep
 

MadTownUberD

The Trendy Transporter
Moderator
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
When I came home from 15 months in Taiwan, I remember being amazed at how quiet traffic is in the US. Over there, you drive with one hand on the horn, honking constantly. And right of way is determined by size. Red lights are suggestions.
This is exactly the input I was looking for. Thanks @Gilby !
 

#professoruber

Well-Known Member
I engage the passenger in all honking. If they are sitting up front, I let them honk.

If the passenger doesn’t seem like a honker or may be offended by a honk, I will warn them I am going to do a friendly honk to keep it moving.

However I don’t drive around like the deranged lunatics that drive around honking at anything and everything.
 

FLKeys

Well-Known Member
I rarely honk my horn. If I do it is because as someone already stated they are doing something that may cause an accident with me.
PAX in the car or not I will honk only when needed to avoid an accident.

One thing I hate is when I am pulling up to a stop sign and the idiot on the cross road feels the need to honk as they are approaching the intersection. Dude is is obvious I am slowing to a stop leave the horn alone.

Classic Miami, light turns green cars start moving immediately, person 10-20 cars back beeps horn because he thinks it helps people move faster. Get off the horn buddy.
 

reg barclay

Well-Known Member
Moderator
IMHO there are two basic kinds of honk where I drive. The more extended honk, which means you're angry at someone, and the less aggressive little 'beep,' which can be just a reminder to the person in front that the light turned green 5 seconds ago. I will do the second type on occasion, with pax in car, but never the first.

As for NYC, I avoid driving there as much as possible. But I've always wondered what the NYC honk means. I mean half the time when a NYC driver honks at someone, they'd probably have cut someone else off, blocked traffic, or done the same kind of lane change themselves, if they deemed it necessary to get where they're going. So what are they honking at? That someone else was just as terrible a driver as they are? It makes some kind of sense to honk in places where the vast majority follow rules, and on rare occasions someone doesn't. But in places like NYC, where terrible driving is more the norm, and the people honking themselves often drive just as badly, I don't get it.
 

MadTownUberD

The Trendy Transporter
Moderator
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #19
I remember a time in Miami where that could get you shot. Mid 90's really change my driving habits when it came to honking for educational purposes.
I'm not too worried about being shot by college students, professors, and state government employees.
Post automatically merged:

IMHO there are two basic kinds of honk where I drive. The more extended honk, which means you're angry at someone, and the less aggressive little 'beep,' which can be just a reminder to the person in front that the light turned green 5 seconds ago. I will do the second type on occasion, with pax in car, but never the first.

As for NYC, I avoid driving there as much as possible. But I've always wondered what the NYC honk means. I mean half the time when a NYC driver honks at someone, they'd probably have cut someone else off, blocked traffic, or done the same kind of lane change themselves, if they deemed it necessary to get where they're going. So what are they honking at? That someone else was just as terrible a driver as they are? It makes some kind of sense to honk in places where the vast majority follow rules, and on rare occasions someone doesn't. But in places like NYC, where terrible driving is more the norm, and the people honking themselves often drive just as badly, I don't get it.
We drove thru Manhattan on our way to Hartford about a month ago. We ended up in a traffic jam due to one lane on 9A being blocked. The situation resulted in a chorus of honking that was more good-natured frustration than anger. It's just something New Yorkers do I think.
 
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