Hey, cabbies...

Michael - Cleveland

Well-Known Member
A lot of cabbies (taxi drivers, hacks) participate on the website here...
most providing useful and helpful information - others just here to bash Uber and Uber drivers.

One of the common myths promoted by cab drivers is that 'absolutely anyone' can register and drive Uber. They also imply and sometimes state outright that taxi drivers are all the cream of the crop - and they brush off any question about why so many consumers prefer Uber drivers to taxi drivers.

So, regardless of your opinion of Uber, cabbies:
What percentage of taxi cab drivers would still be driving today
if they were rated by each paying rider for each ride provided (as Uber drivers are)
on a scale of 1 to 5...
and knowing that if their average rating was 4 or below that they would be fired?
 

hanging in there

Well-Known Member
A lot of cabbies (taxi drivers, hacks) participate on the website here...
most providing useful and helpful information - others just here to bash Uber and Uber drivers.

One of the common myths promoted by cab drivers is that 'absolutely anyone' can register and drive Uber. They also imply and sometimes state outright that taxi drivers are all the cream of the crop - and they brush off any question about why so many consumers prefer Uber drivers to taxi drivers.

So, regardless of your opinion of Uber, cabbies:
What percentage of taxi cab drivers would still be driving today
if they were rated by each paying rider for each ride provided (as Uber drivers are)
on a scale of 1 to 5...
and knowing that if their average rating was 4 or below that they would be fired?
In my experience (5 cab companies + TCP in the last 8 years in three different counties) maybe 60% of the new cab drivers don't last beyond 2-3 weeks as it is, and I'd say only about 20-30% of them last for more than a few months. That's why typically you can say with confidence that "the cab company ALWAYS needs drivers, that "position" or "opportunity" is ALWAYS open". Even if all cars are currently leased out, the owners know that it's only a short time before someone else bites the dust and turns the cab back in. Owner/operator cab drivers are generally more seasoned veterans who know they have enough of a future that they are willing to make that commitment.

So to answer your question, let's say the 20-30% of new cab drivers who last at least a few months had to undergo the same rating system, I would guess that most of them would still hang in there and survive as cab drivers not because they currently provide that level of service but because they would be forced to, and because they have already survived an otherwise tough road so they are accustomed to overcoming difficulties and are more committed to the "job". The one's who don't cut it are generally already out for many other reasons, the star rating would only be one more roadblock.

In the big picture it would probably eliminate maybe 20% of that 20-30% surviving pool, most of them non-owner/operators because they would have less to lose by not playing the "5-star service" game.

Bottom line: I believe it would be a good thing in general, it would improve the taxi experience, and most of the drivers would not be "fired" that would otherwise survive.

Side note: The sad part about the Uber driving experience is that, even though from my limited experience, it is much easier to "stay saddled on the bucking bull" for a longer time as a new Uber driver compared to being a new taxi driver, there are still going to be many of the same reasons why people will find that doing livery work is not for them, and with Uber they have to make the commitment of using their own car right off the bat. For some it's not a big deal but it is if they have to buy or lease a car just to try it. I had a new Uber driver on the way home from the airport today and he didn't have a clue, I should have rated him no more than 2 or 3 but didn't have the heart to ding a newbie so I still gave him a 5.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Hanging in There expressed it well. Perhaps twenty per-cent would be bent over, have the door held open for them then someone would take a running start, plant a foot squarely in their posterior with the result that they were sent flying out into the street.

As hanging in there accurately states, the survivors would realise that if they did not act right, they would get the boot, so the majority of them would fall into line. We have Uber Taxi in this market. I must state that it has put me on my toes even with a street hail, so that I get used to keeping up the standard.

To be sure, I always have maintained higher standards of service. If I pull up to an address or stop for a street hail, if I see a suitcase, grocery bags, boxes, whatever, I get out, open the trunk and help. I do not remain seated in the cab after I press the trunk button. At least I get out and get the door if they have all of their stuff in their arms. I have always done this, but since Uber Taxi I have made doubly sure that I do it.

I always have treated my customers with courtesy and respect, but, again, I make sure to be extra polite to everyone. I make sure that the air condition is to their liking. If it is too cold, I will adjust it back. If it is n ot cool enough, I will adjust it up.

I make sure that I heard or saw (on the application) the destination that they announced. If they specify a route, I make sure to let them know that I am familiar with the route that they want. If there are alternatives on the route that they are specifying, I make sure that I understand which choice they want me to make. When the passenger announces the destination or, I see it on the application, I let the passenger know that I am familiar with something about the destination. If they are going to the George Hotel, I say something like, "Oh , yes, the old Bellvue Hotel". If they want to go to the Embassy of France, I say "Oh, yes, on Reservoir Road up from Georgetown Hospital".

Sometimes, I would get a bit lax, here and there, but those times are fewer since Uber Taxi.
 

Michael - Cleveland

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
thank you hanging in there and Another Uber Driver ... these are the responses I was looking for.

What brought it all to mind was my overall emotional response to the whole ride-share phenomena: if taxi companies (not the owner/operators) had put service first 5 years ago when they could have implemented things like driver ratings, app-hail and app-pay, Uber and Lyft would likely have never been able to get a foothold in any of the major cities. It would still be a black-car service - if that. The only markets they might have been able to get into would have been markets where no cab company would implement technology to improve the user experience.

That being said, I know that in my market, a good 50% of my rides are NOT coming from people who would have called a cab... they come from people who would have driven themselves or called a friend.

Again - thanks...
I'm looking forward to hearing responses from more hacks...
 
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Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
What brought it all to mind was my overall emotional response to the whole ride-share phenomena: if taxi companies (not the owner/operators) had put service first 5 years ago when they could have implemented things like driver ratings, app-hail and app-pay... Uber and Lyft would likely have never been able to get a foothold in any of the major cities. It would still be a black-car service - if that.

That being said, I know that in my market, a good 50% of my rides are NOT coming from people who would have called a cab... they come from people who would have driven themselves or called a friend.

Your statements are not off the mark. A little history on Uber's arrival, here, is illustrative.

The limousines were first discovered in October, 2012. It is likely that they were here as early as May. There was a big to-do about it, as Uber was breaking a number of rules and laws. The Chair of the Taxicab Commission even did a sting on a Uber limousine. There was an outcry from the Uber users and some other things occurred which I will not detail here, except to state that the pertinent member of the City Council suddenly became Uber's greatest advocate, here. In February, 2013, Uber Taxi arrived. The users were so happy that Uber had taxis in Washington. They did not want to pay limousine rates. They liked taking taxis, but they did not like having to carry cash to pay for them. More than a few of my passengers used to gripe about having to carry cash for one thing, only, anymore: a taxi. In October, 2013, credit card acceptance became mandatory for Washington cabs. In early 2014 (I seem to remember February) UberX launched in Washington.

I have accepted credit cards in my cab since 1998. I was one of the first taxi drivers that Uber signed-up for Uber Taxi, here. I signed on to UberX in June, 2014.

In 1998, I was mid-management at the major West Side cab company in Washington. The West Side is where the money is, here. I told the Board of Directors back then, that they needed to get a website, set it up to accept on-line orders and compel the drivers to accept credit cards. The Board would not do it. In 1999, I became Corporate Secretary of that company. I continued to push the above three, in vain. My Board would not go for it. In 2007, I sold my interest in that company. By that time, a major competitor had installed a digital call assignment system, compelled its drivers to accept credit cards and had an on-line ordering system. The only reason that it could not take our customers was that it had a really hard time covering its requests.

Fall, 2012, and Uber is "discovered" here. As I was still working with my former company as a dispatcher, I had been noticing a slight drop in calls since the late Spring. Even though Uber rates are up to five times the cab fare, the people on the West Side are now abandoning their former cab company in droves. Uber is offering them seamless payment, and reliability. The user can open his application and decide for himself when, or if, he will get a ride. If he sees no vehicles available, he knows immediately to do something else, rather than wait twenty minutes to figure out that he must do something else. All that my former company could offer them was mostly cash acceptance; few drivers accepted cards. Further, my former company could offer them long waits on HOLD, rude order takers, incompetents on the microphone (mostly, that is--there were one or two of us left who knew what we were doing), long waits or no ride at all. My former company was broke by then (and you wonder why I sold out?), so it could not afford to become competitive. The other two companies did update. One is keeping its drivers busy with its numerous Corporate Accounts. The other one (the one with which I am now affiliated) does many Government contracts to keep its drivers busy.

Had my Board of Directors listened to me in 1998, or, even as late as 2005, Uber might have been a limousine service, only, here.

UberX might, and I state, might have gotten a toe-hold here, but it would not be what it is to-day. As you have stated, large numbers of UberX users are people who never would use a cab, anyhow. In your market, it is fifty per-cent. Here it is closer to seventy-five to eighty-five per-cent. That is the number of my UberX passengers who have told me that they never would have used a cab, or , rarely used a cab. They hate the subway, but will not pay for a taxi to get off it. They will, however, pay for UberX to get off it.

UberX has sent a few users to Uber Taxi here. These are people who game the surge. Depending on their personal threshold, usually between 1,4 and 1,7, they use UberX up until the surge hits that mark. If the surge hits that mark, they use Uber Taxi. Those who do not game the surge, will simply go back to the subway if they do not like the surge.
 

Michael - Cleveland

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
Thank you for the informative post.
Great read... and right in line with my thoughts.

Imagine what the situation in NYC would be today if the NYC TLC had implemented a city-wide online system in 2010 for app-hailing, with ride requests going to the nearest car - regardless of company affiliation.

There are so many examples of this over the last 50 years, in every industry. You would the geniuses who collect multi-million dollar salaries and stock options would have learned by now that if you ignore your competition and refuse to change with technological advances, you die.

ByeBye Kresge
ByeBye K-Mart
ByeBye Kodak
ByeBye Olivetti
ByeBye Borders
ByeBye Blockbuster
ByeBye Polaroid
ByeBye half the print newspapers in the country
ByeBye Chicken-Delight... wait... that one should really still be around.
 
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Raquel

Well-Known Member
thank you... these are the responses I was looking for.

What brought it all to mind was my overall emotional response to the whole ride-share phenomena: if taxi companies (not the owner/operators) had put service first 5 years ago when they could have implemented things like driver ratings, app-hail and app-pay... Uber and Lyft would likely have never been able to get a foothold in any of the major cities. It would still be a black-car service - if that. The only markets they might have been able to get into would have been markets where no cab company would implement technology to improve the user experience.

That being said, I know that in my market, a good 50% of my rides are NOT coming from people who would have called a cab... they come from people who would have driven themselves or called a friend.

Again - thanks...
I'm looking forward to hearing responses from more hacks...
I think MOST of your rides, like most of all uberX rides wouldn't have driven themselves, they would have taken PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION...At 0.90 a mile or even lower in some areas, Uber no longer competes with taxis...they compete with public transportation...and they have said as much.. I've even seen a large amount of uber ads on buses, and trains and even bus stops... Sadly that is reality and uber has gone out of their way to on board more and more people from public transportation...I think most if you have noticed a gradual decrease in the "quality" of the pax.... before it used to be a lot of corporate types and young college kids living on their parents money...now it has shifted more and more towards drunks, trailer trash, druggies, etc, etc..
 

Michael - Cleveland

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
I think MOST of your rides, like most of all uberX rides wouldn't have driven themselves, they would have taken PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
Maybe for you - but not my rides.
Here, it's at least 50% that only use Uber because they don't want to drink & drive (the night crowd).
I am 100% certain that no one here gets a couple of friends together (or a date) and says
'let's take a bus downtown to go party'.
(and the buses don't run at 2:30AM when the bars close anyway)

The day crowd is nearly all business... and they would call a cab.

This is Cleveland -
we don't have a PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION system that extends to the suburbs, where most people live.
Where it does exist, you could grow old trying to get somewhere using it.
 
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Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
The other thing that you have had here, at least, is that the taxicab drivers refused to rise to meet the demands of their market. I refer to the acceptance of non-cash payments. I have accepted credit cards in my cab since 1998--I saw a demand for it THEN.

Any merchant who will not rise to meet the demands of his market is doomed to failure. I have no degree in either Business Administration or Economics, but it takes neither to understand that.


People were using Uber limousine here, and, paying up to five times the cab fare, just for the convenience of using a credit card. When Uber Taxi came, it made the limousine drivers complain, because a small percentage of the taxis were getting their customers back.

It was funny. When I went to the Uber event at the restaurant, Uber made its pitch, it was a good one, so I signed up. There were drivers who were balking at it. Yeah, the cash may be all good and wonderful, but it ain't how people wanna' pay no more. Now that there is a way to find out if and when your ride is showing up, people want to use it. Drivers are balking at that, as well.

Despite the presence of the City mandated credit card terminals in the cabs, I have kept my own (not Square). The DCTC tries to tell us that we can not allow customers to use anything other than the terminal in the cab. That MUST BE ILLEGAL. Further, the City-mandated terminals are prone to failure. As you are no doubt aware, if you use a card frequently, the magnetic strip gets beat up and many terminals will not read it. The keypad on the City-mandated terminals is non-functional. Finally, some people, such as elderly, on crutches or disabled find it easier to get into the front. The City-mandated terminal is in the back seat, only.

In my cab, if a customer wants to pay with a card, he is going to pay with a card. I am not going to make him go to a cash machine just because the City terminal will not work, will not allow me to key in the card manually or will not read his card. I am not making someone who can not use the back seat go there just to pay with a card.

In fact, since all of us will have to have terminals that will read chips by October, I have asked my provider if it can get me a terminal that does Google Wallet, ApplePay and PayPal. This will allow me to offer my customers all sorts of ways to pay me. In fact, if Uber would implement a Pay with Uber option for Uber Taxi users, something that Hail-O does, it will take the dice out of paying with Uber now. I have had users notice my Uberfone or Uber logo and ask to pay with Uber. Chicago Uber users do this all the time if they happen to hail an Uber Taxi. Some of them like the convenience of the e-Mailed receipt. Some like to have all of their transportation bills in one place. To pay an Uber Taxi with Uber now, it is a bit dicey. You would think that since the user is sitting no more than six feet from me, the request would go to me. Usually, it does. Sometimes, however, it does not. Fortunately, if the user cancels right away, Uber does not charge him. If the user sends the request again, it has come to me every time but once. That user had to try three times. Chicago users tell me that two tries is not infrequent and three happen more frequently than anyone would think.

Hail-O pulled out of North America, but they are still in Europe and Asia, competing with Uber and a few others. Hail-O has implemented "Pay with Hail-O" in Europe and Asia.
 

Michael - Cleveland

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
You would think that since the user is sitting no more than six feet from me, the request would go to me. Usually, it does. Sometimes, however, it does not. Fortunately, if the user cancels right away, Uber does not charge him. If the user sends the request again, it has come to me every time but once. That user had to try three times. Chicago users tell me that two tries is not infrequent and three happen more frequently than anyone would think.
Don't feel alone - the same thing happens with Uber's ride-share - all the time.
 

Michael - Cleveland

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
well, I guess that answers that question...
hard to imagine you'd last a week.
And to answer your question:
RIDERS give a fu*k.
Which is why they prefer Uber to a hack like you - who doesn't give a fu*k.
 

Hackenstein

Well-Known Member
well, I guess that answers that question...
hard to imagine you'd last a week.
And to answer your question:
RIDERS give a fu*k.
Which is why they prefer Uber to a hack like you - who doesn't give a fu*k.
I wouldn't last one minute or ever subject myself to that sort of degradation.

I don't get many complaints from passengers, and get a pretty good number of compliments. I'm not a puppet on a string for them and vice versa. Or for some Billionaire pricks in Silicon Valley who want smiling robot drivers until they can replace them with actual robot cars.
 

Michael - Cleveland

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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
I wouldn't last one minute
You said it - not me.
I'm not a puppet on a string for them ...
Good.
Me either. I get a ride request that's too far away - I don't accept it.
I pull up to a group of fall-down drunk riders - I move on.
I drive only when I have the time - and want to.
Someone gets stupid in my car - they're out on the street.

I think Uber's rating system is pretty bad.
But it's a thousand times better than no rating system at all - the way cabs operate (with next to no accountability).

At least with Uber, all it takes is a few 1 star ratings and a complaint about anything from poor driving to bad breath and your off the system... as it should be.
 
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Hackenstein

Well-Known Member
You said it - not me.

Good.
Me either. I get a ride request I that's too far away - I don't accept it.
I pull up to a group of fall-down drunk riders - I move on.
I drive only when I have the time - and want to.
Someone gets stupid in my car - they're out on the street.

I think Uber's rating system is pretty bad.
But it's a thousand times better than no rating system at all - the way cabs operate (with next to no accountability).

At least with Uber, all it takes is a few 1 star ratings and a complaint about anything from poor driving to bad breath and your off the system... as it should be.
Well gosh golly gee, how have taxis lasted 100 years in NYC without a bullshit big brother rating system

My God, how do we even have MTA bus drivers , they're not rated on every trip and tossed a fish for the 'right attitude' like a trained seal.

No accountability? Passengers in a yellow cab have an actual number to call and report you. In fact it's on every receipt and on a placard in front of them on the partition. Dial 311, get connected directly to the TLC.

Seems like you also have no idea how strict the points system is for taxis and how relentlessly targeted and ticketed they are by the cops.

And now, sparkles inserts a reply to every single line I typed and wastes everyone's time.
 

Taxi Driver in Arizona

Well-Known Member
Excellent question, OP. I like to think I would be able to survive being rates by my pax, but we'll never know. I do know that I've yet to receive a customer complaint in 12 years of doing this.

Let me ask you a question. How long do you think you would last as a taxi driver? You have no idea what it's like not know if you're even going to get paid at the end of every ride. Stiffs and runners are fairly rare, but they happen and on more than one occasion I had to get a bit aggressive in demanding payment.

What would you do when you are dropping off a pax at the airport and their credit card is declined? You just going to let them walk away and not pay you the $50 they owe?
 

Hackenstein

Well-Known Member
Excellent question, OP. I like to think I would be able to survive being rates by my pax, but we'll never know. I do know that I've yet to receive a customer complaint in 12 years of doing this.

Let me ask you a question. How long do you think you would last as a taxi driver? You have no idea what it's like not know if you're even going to get paid at the end of every ride. Stiffs and runners are fairly rare, but they happen and on more than one occasion I had to get a bit aggressive in demanding payment.

What would you do when you are dropping off a pax at the airport and their credit card is declined? You just going to let them walk away and not pay you the $50 they owe?
Yeah, I love how Uber plays up the 'we go to the outer boroughs' angle while only taking people with pre-approved credit cards on file. Exactly.

I've found myself in the Bronx at 6 AM with a kid who jumps out and runs into a project. I 'provided excellent service' and that was my reward.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
- the way cabs operate (with next to no accountability).
I do not know what happens in Cleveland, but, with respect to Washington, the above quoted statement IS FALSE. There are rules, regulations and laws that are over-enforced against legitimate drivers while lawbreakers are ignored. People with large sums of money are allowed to operate almost regulation free while cab drivers and companies are overregulated with oppressive and unduly burdensome rules.

The regulators here continue to put into effect more and more rules and regulations that trample the Constitutional, Common Law and Legislated protections of cab drivers and cab companies. Regulators continue to wear down drivers' Due Process Rights while making it easy for obviously frivolous complaints not only to receive a hearing, but are upheld.

The only reason that anyone could state that there is "no accountability" here would be due to "accountability" 's being a misnomer: replace "accountability" with OPPRESSION.

As Hackenstein indicates, below, the situation in New York City is not dissimilar. I never hacked in New York. I did live there. I have family there, still. I have talked extensively to New York hackers. Thus, I have some idea of up with which they must put. What Hackenstein posts on the subject is more than plausible. I would lay odds that it understates the case, in fact. I would venture that the statements from the Gentleman from Arizona are on the mark, as well, as he describes, and has described, more than a few situations in which I have found myself, over the years. Hackenstein has done the same.

Similar to New York, cabs in Washington must have a "Passenger Rights Statement" in the cab. Amoung other things, this statement indicates the procedure for filing complaints, and does so in plain language; one of the few D.C. Government Publications that uses plain language. Over the years, the Taxicab Commission has slowly worn down our Rights to Due Process with the result that it is extremely difficult to defend against even an obviously frivolous complaint. Drivers are presumed guilty, even when proved innocent.





No accountability? Passengers in a yellow cab have an actual number to call and report you. In fact it's on every receipt and on a placard in front of them on the partition. Dial 311, get connected directly to the TLC.

Seems like you also have no idea how strict the points system is for taxis and how relentlessly targeted and ticketed they are by the cops.
In New York, I can see that you go through similar to what we must deal with, here. I did forget to add that the complaint number is on every receipt, here, as well. Here, be it Downtown or in the neighbourhoods, most people are paying electronically. You do see a little more cash in the poorer neighbourhoods, but, even many of the people who live there are paying electronically. I would suspect that the majority of people in Manhattan are using cards. I do not know how much you run the Boroughs, but if you run them at all, I would be curious to know how frequently they use cards, and where. In the places in the Boroughs where I used to live, I would suspect that most used cards. The one exception might be those who live over by St. Raymond's Cemetery. That neighbourhood has changed a little since I lived there.




Excellent question, OP. I like to think I would be able to survive being rates by my pax, but we'll never know. I do know that I've yet to receive a customer complaint in 12 years of doing this.

Let me ask you a question. How long do you think you would last as a taxi driver? You have no idea what it's like not know if you're even going to get paid at the end of every ride. Stiffs and runners are fairly rare, but they happen and on more than one occasion I had to get a bit aggressive in demanding payment.

What would you do when you are dropping off a pax at the airport and their credit card is declined? You just going to let them walk away and not pay you the $50 they owe?

You point out one, amoung many, of the glaring differences between Uber and hacking. If the customer's card is declined, Uber will pay. It does not work that way in the cab. In fact, one of the things that I like about Uber Taxi is that I get paid even if the card is no good. What I did not like about My Taxi was that if the customer treid ot pay through the application and the card was no good, you hoped that either he had cash or another card that you could run. I had two bad cards on My Taxi. Fortunately, one had cash, the other had a card that he managed to run through my personal terminal. The terminal in the cab would not read the card, nor would mine. I had to key it in, manually.

While this is not necessarily directed at the Original Poster, I must agree with your asking the question about lasting as a cab driver. I have posted in more than one place on this forum that it is obvious that there are more than a few Uber drivers who have more than a little to learn about this business.

The overwhelming majority of the cab drivers, current and former, who post here know their stuff and have posted more than a little that merits serious consideration from some of these rookies, here. The two hackers whom I have quoted in this post are amoung those whose words deserve serious consideration and careful reading.

......and you can add some of the long time limousine drivers and operators who post here to the category of "knowing their stuff", as well...................

.........and I am not unjustified in referring to the many UberX drivers a "rookies". More than a few of the UberX drivers never had driven anyone, anywhere, for compensation before this. I do not mean collecting a few bucks for gasolene when you drove a carload of buddies to the baseball game; I mean driving day in and day out, several hours daily, for regular compensation. Uber has been out here for five years, yes, but in its early years, it was in California, only. the limousines came here in 2012; Uber Taxi, 2013; UberX; 2014. UberX has been here for a little less than two years. While some things are starting to show, most of the UberX drivers have not had the opportunities to experience everything that those of us who have been out here for some time have.

Yes, some of you have become jaded quickly, but you have not become really jaded Y-E-T. Some of your cars are starting to get rough around the edges, but shortly their cloth seats and carpeted floors will deteriorate more quickly that our vinyl seats and rubber floors. You have not had the ecstatic pleasure of receiving an enormous repair bill for having something replaced on your car of which that your mechanic nevr knew existed until he started taking apart your car.

It will come soon enough, have no fear. I give it another two years, or so, although more and more will appear sooner.
 

Michael - Cleveland

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #20
how have taxis lasted 100 years in NYC without a bullshit big brother rating system
Gee golly wiz, you don't think maybe it has something to do with NO BETTER ALTERNATIVE?

Maybe you haven't noticed because you're in the NYC bubble without a clue of what's going on anywhere else, but public transportation systems (mass-transit) are struggling everywhere and implementing changes to increase ridership - and use technology.

Really - you think that people using Yellow Taxis call the company after EVERY ride to voice their rating - good or bad?

Seems like you also have no idea how strict the points system is for taxis and how relentlessly targeted and ticketed they are by the cops.
Funny that you can't post anything without some personal attack and insult. Says a lot about you as a person. 1*
Cops? You're at such a loss for a relevant reply that you have to keep inserting things that are irrelevant to the topic at hand?
And have you noticed that you're the only person that seems to think that my making my replies to individual points in a msg easily readable is somehow a bad thing?
 
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