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Google maps wacko

Shakur

Well-Known Member
No, I dont. I have T mobile and verizon and it works perfect on both.

Try repenting and maybe God will have mercy on your alternative american soul.
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
I have no idea why Google maps went crazy on me.. Anyone have this experience?
Google is exacting Revenge on Uber for stealing self driving cars . . . .
You
Are Collateral Damage.

No, I dont. I have T mobile and verizon and it works perfect on both.

Try repenting and maybe God will have mercy on your alternative american soul.
How about Repainting ?
What color does God like ?
 

lakersfan1

Well-Known Member
You just not used to driving in the city. Welcome to every single day on Wacker Drive. I shut it down when I approach the river. Google Maps does this to me on the I90 overpass in Schaumburg @ Roselle Rd all the time.
 

Prius13

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
You just not used to driving in the city. Welcome to every single day on Wacker Drive. I shut it down when I approach the river. Google Maps does this to me on the I90 overpass in Schaumburg @ Roselle Rd all the time.
OK thanks for letting me know. Not unique experience then..
 

Mapnik

Well-Known Member
OK thanks for letting me know. Not unique experience then..
Of course it's not unique... do you think Google is God or that the GPS system is somehow infallible? You should know where your going regardless, not following the navigation step-by-step. If you are taking Roosevelt to wherever, just do that and don't worry about the navigation except for the traffic info.

You know why this annoys me? Because I get tired of people (usually ladies) getting in the car and they start telling me, in a decidedly derisive tone, "Ok, turn around..." - because they get driver after driver that doesn't have a clue where he's going and relies completely on Google, which will get it wrong a large percentage of the time. I also get really tired of pax saying, "where's it taking you?" Answer: the machine doesn't take me anywhere - I do the driving and go where I intend to go; I'm not led around on a leash by a piece of software. They assume this shit because of all the clueless drivers.

When they start looking over my shoulder at the navigation and saying, "Don't do ____"... I turn the shit off completely and just drive, because it only takes about 5 seconds to decide where you're going, then it's just a matter of keeping the routeplan in your mind, which should be a literal no-brainer. When the screen goes blank, they shut the @@@@ up.

If you have to look at the navigation before you make a turn so you know you are on the right street, please find another line of work. Use navigation for assistance, not leadership. Read the road signs - take suggestions from Google, but look at the overall path before you commit to it, and once you commit to it, then you should have in your head "Roosevelt to Wherever to Wherever"... then when you start getting close, look ahead at the drop, figure out whether it's a one-way, etc, and decide what the final approach is going to be. You should be doing this as you are cruising. Do not wait until Google pulls your leash onto a given street and then start trying to go down the back alley - this is completely asinine, and one should already know that unless the rider asks you to go to the alley, you drop them in FRONT of the house.

This is about using your own eyes instead of letting a piece of software dictate reality to you. The pax are just as bad half the time. I've had people standing across the street, for 2-3 minutes, staring at their phone, because the phone says I'm 1 minute away. Open your eyes and look around, and take a few simple steps like checking the make/model/color of the car. This should be common sense, especially for somebody who has the wherewithal to graduate college and/or work for a major corporation.

Moreover, "GPS" and "Navigation" are not the same thing. Two completely different concepts. I had a little chit-chat with a cab driver the other day... he says, "you know where you going? you need de GPS?".... my response: "Yes, i do know where I'm going - how are you doing, you making any money?" End of convo. But, this is critical, because GPS locates you in space (or tries to) based on a group of satellites orbiting Earth. GPS does not tell you where to go. Navigation tells you where to go, and that system is based on network-analysis algorithms (which may or may not work properly) and some base information, including a street map (which may or may not be correct), your position (as determined by GPS, which may or may not be correct), and traffic data (which may or may not be correct). You may not need GPS to know where you are, and, frankly, you shouldn't ever need the software to tell you where you are. There are signs everywhere and you need to look around at the real world. If you don't need the GPS, you might still benefit from Navigation, subject to the limitations described above. So don't let people conflate the two features if they are trying to analyze your skills.
 
Last edited:

Grand Master B

Well-Known Member
I have no idea why Google maps went crazy on me.. Anyone have this experience?
i'd have to say about 1% of the time for me. i've noticed another potential problem for new drivers in the area using google maps. maps at times skips instructions on junctions where expressways changes and/or splits. eastbound i-88 to eastbound 290, there is a step where it instructs the driver to merge w/ eastbound 290 and then give next direction to the city. it's not been doing that.
 

Mindozas

Well-Known Member
Last week Saturday morning I dropped off at field museum on Lyft and after checking uber app showing surge I jumped on LSD northbound hoping to catch a juicy one. Exiting on Randolph/Wacker I get the ping @1.8, smiling from ear to ear, but then I noticed the address, which confused me a bit, it showed Lower Wacker and Upper Wacker....hmm from the pin it looked the pax was closest to Swiss hotel, so I took the ramp up, took the illegal u-turn at Columbus and got to the hotel, parked, waited few minutes, no pax. Then I called her and the first thing the pax said, she's at Sheraton. Really? Ok, I be there in few minutes. As I'm turning from Stetson to lower Wacker, pax calls me, asking if I know where I am going(sensing some attitude now). Yes, ma'am I'm one light away. When saw she had suitcase I got my smile back, yep, she's going to ORD. Just because she waited outside the hotel entrance after picking her up I took Park st, had to turn right on Illinois, another two rights and here I decided to take lower Wacker all the way to Congress, as I explained my pax, that it's always better to type actuall address or name of a building rather than leaving it up to the app to find your location. She agreed to me. Turned out to be $45 trip for me and $1.93 for Uber.
 

Attachments

UberAtom

New Member
I have no idea why Google maps went crazy on me.. Anyone have this experience?
Mine has been acting up, too. From the Uber app, I hit the navigate button and Google Maps opens (so far so good...). Then, Google will either say it can't find the address or it will provide an address that's near the rider but, far enough away that you wouldn't see the rider. I think it has something to do with the Uber app communicating the information to Google Maps. Annoying as hell...
 

Wil_Iam_Fuber'd

Well-Known Member
Of course it's not unique... do you think Google is God or that the GPS system is somehow infallible? You should know where your going regardless, not following the navigation step-by-step. If you are taking Roosevelt to wherever, just do that and don't worry about the navigation except for the traffic info.

You know why this annoys me? Because I get tired of people (usually ladies) getting in the car and they start telling me, in a decidedly derisive tone, "Ok, turn around..." - because they get driver after driver that doesn't have a clue where he's going and relies completely on Google, which will get it wrong a large percentage of the time. I also get really tired of pax saying, "where's it taking you?" Answer: the machine doesn't take me anywhere - I do the driving and go where I intend to go; I'm not led around on a leash by a piece of software. They assume this shit because of all the clueless drivers.

When they start looking over my shoulder at the navigation and saying, "Don't do ____"... I turn the shit off completely and just drive, because it only takes about 5 seconds to decide where you're going, then it's just a matter of keeping the routeplan in your mind, which should be a literal no-brainer. When the screen goes blank, they shut the &%$@!* up.

If you have to look at the navigation before you make a turn so you know you are on the right street, please find another line of work. Use navigation for assistance, not leadership. Read the road signs - take suggestions from Google, but look at the overall path before you commit to it, and once you commit to it, then you should have in your head "Roosevelt to Wherever to Wherever"... then when you start getting close, look ahead at the drop, figure out whether it's a one-way, etc, and decide what the final approach is going to be. You should be doing this as you are cruising. Do not wait until Google pulls your leash onto a given street and then start trying to go down the back alley - this is completely asinine, and one should already know that unless the rider asks you to go to the alley, you drop them in FRONT of the house.

This is about using your own eyes instead of letting a piece of software dictate reality to you. The pax are just as bad half the time. I've had people standing across the street, for 2-3 minutes, staring at their phone, because the phone says I'm 1 minute away. Open your eyes and look around, and take a few simple steps like checking the make/model/color of the car. This should be common sense, especially for somebody who has the wherewithal to graduate college and/or work for a major corporation.

Moreover, "GPS" and "Navigation" are not the same thing. Two completely different concepts. I had a little chit-chat with a cab driver the other day... he says, "you know where you going? you need de GPS?".... my response: "Yes, i do know where I'm going - how are you doing, you making any money?" End of convo. But, this is critical, because GPS locates you in space (or tries to) based on a group of satellites orbiting Earth. GPS does not tell you where to go. Navigation tells you where to go, and that system is based on network-analysis algorithms (which may or may not work properly) and some base information, including a street map (which may or may not be correct), your position (as determined by GPS, which may or may not be correct), and traffic data (which may or may not be correct). You may not need GPS to know where you are, and, frankly, you shouldn't ever need the software to tell you where you are. There are signs everywhere and you need to look around at the real world. If you don't need the GPS, you might still benefit from Navigation, subject to the limitations described above. So don't let people conflate the two features if they are trying to analyze your skills.
This is a He-Man whopping portion of "micro-aggression" served up here. Feel better now Map??
 

ChiGuy

Well-Known Member
It's normal for the satellite signal to be loose at some point on the map, sometimes it's happening when you are on the bridge, the gps thinks you might be under the bridge, so this is not something new but it has been going for years maybe since the Peruvians found about Machu Picchu existense.
 
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