First London, NY next? Fuber is in trouble!

Fuberal

Well-Known Member
After London Bans Uber, New York Weighs Limits to Help Cabbies
By
Henry Goldman
September 25, 2017, 1:02 PM PDT
  • Council may study ride-sharing impact on taxi medallion values
  • Cab owners say they’re in dire straits and need city’s rescue




Uber's License in London Is Revoked

A week after London moved to revoke Uber Technologies Inc.’s operating license, the company and its electronic ride-hailing competitors are feeling the heat in New York as city officials consider moves to regulate and control the industry.

The City Council on Monday was considering a six-month study of Uber’s impact on the traditional yellow cab business, where the value of medallions -- licenses to operate taxis -- has dropped by 90 percent in the past four years. Medallion owners and some council members say the city shouldn’t have allowed companies like Uber and Lyft to operate in New York without applying the same fees and regulations.

The taxi owners are pushing for officials to rescue their industry. They are emboldened by London’s move to ban Uber’s 40,000 drivers amid company failures to do adequate driver background checks.

“If the competition continues to insist on playing by a different set of rules, then New York should simply follow London and tell Uber to hit the road,” said Richard Lipsky, a spokesman for the Taxi Medallion Owners and Drivers Association, an organization that he says includes more than 6,000 immigrants.

Uber Campaign
The last attempt at regulating the mobile ride-hailing companies ended badly for Mayor Bill de Blasio, who failed to limit the vehicles’ increasing presence on Manhattan’s clogged streets. The mayor backed down after Uber ran a multi-million-dollar television and social-media ad campaign that accused him of taking jobs from cab-driving immigrants, whom the mayor has considered part of his political base.

Taxi license owners also count themselves as losers and victims of Uber’s rise. Medallion Financial Corp., a public company specializing in taxi-medallion financing, has seen its stock drop to $2.13 Monday from a high of $17.74 in November 2013. Last month, MGPE Inc., a hedge fund, bought 46 medallions out of foreclosure for about $200,000 each including fees, according to Medallion Financial President Andrew Murstein. That’s down from an all-time high of about $1.3 million four years ago, Murstein said.

Yellow cab operators are subject to the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission regulations governing driver qualifications and cab operations. That includes prohibitions on phone use, which don’t apply to electronic-hail drivers. While yellow cabs are restricted to about 13,600 in New York City, there’s no limit on how many Uber and Lyft cars may cruise city streets.

Crowded Streets
Before the advent of the app-based ride-sharing industry, there were about 38,000 vehicles for hire on the streets. Now there are about 110,000 cars competing for riders, and city officials say they expect 35,000 more within a year.
 

UberAnt39

Well-Known Member
A taxi medallion shouldn't have any value in the first place.
The result of a corrupt City/private company arrangement has been usurped by an alternate service, and the people, both drivers & pax, have decided to benefit from it, not the pols or some protected guild.
 

Pinapple Man

Well-Known Member
After London Bans Uber, New York Weighs Limits to Help Cabbies
By
Henry Goldman
September 25, 2017, 1:02 PM PDT
  • Council may study ride-sharing impact on taxi medallion values
  • Cab owners say they’re in dire straits and need city’s rescue




Uber's License in London Is Revoked

A week after London moved to revoke Uber Technologies Inc.’s operating license, the company and its electronic ride-hailing competitors are feeling the heat in New York as city officials consider moves to regulate and control the industry.

The City Council on Monday was considering a six-month study of Uber’s impact on the traditional yellow cab business, where the value of medallions -- licenses to operate taxis -- has dropped by 90 percent in the past four years. Medallion owners and some council members say the city shouldn’t have allowed companies like Uber and Lyft to operate in New York without applying the same fees and regulations.

The taxi owners are pushing for officials to rescue their industry. They are emboldened by London’s move to ban Uber’s 40,000 drivers amid company failures to do adequate driver background checks.

“If the competition continues to insist on playing by a different set of rules, then New York should simply follow London and tell Uber to hit the road,” said Richard Lipsky, a spokesman for the Taxi Medallion Owners and Drivers Association, an organization that he says includes more than 6,000 immigrants.

Uber Campaign
The last attempt at regulating the mobile ride-hailing companies ended badly for Mayor Bill de Blasio, who failed to limit the vehicles’ increasing presence on Manhattan’s clogged streets. The mayor backed down after Uber ran a multi-million-dollar television and social-media ad campaign that accused him of taking jobs from cab-driving immigrants, whom the mayor has considered part of his political base.

Taxi license owners also count themselves as losers and victims of Uber’s rise. Medallion Financial Corp., a public company specializing in taxi-medallion financing, has seen its stock drop to $2.13 Monday from a high of $17.74 in November 2013. Last month, MGPE Inc., a hedge fund, bought 46 medallions out of foreclosure for about $200,000 each including fees, according to Medallion Financial President Andrew Murstein. That’s down from an all-time high of about $1.3 million four years ago, Murstein said.

Yellow cab operators are subject to the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission regulations governing driver qualifications and cab operations. That includes prohibitions on phone use, which don’t apply to electronic-hail drivers. While yellow cabs are restricted to about 13,600 in New York City, there’s no limit on how many Uber and Lyft cars may cruise city streets.

Crowded Streets
Before the advent of the app-based ride-sharing industry, there were about 38,000 vehicles for hire on the streets. Now there are about 110,000 cars competing for riders, and city officials say they expect 35,000 more within a year.
I'm to save us from BORING TOPICS and other anti-American things!!!! No fan of the the FUBER, but definitely not of those USELESS TAXI CABS!!!! Who gives a crap about their medallions that are like junk bonds. Back during the thirty's the Jewish mafia bought up all the "medallion's" that NYC made available. Only after generations of immigrants with no job history or formal education became the taxi cab industry. Just like any other criminal financial act it started in NYC. Someone wanted to buy something that could not be bought or replaced except by selling the existing medallions they were MONETIZATIZED though free market principles just like BIT COIN today. Taxis are welcome to drop their price at or below FUBER but no outside interference from Deblasio and the other democrats!!!!
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
After London Bans Uber, New York Weighs Limits to Help Cabbies
By
Henry Goldman
September 25, 2017, 1:02 PM PDT
  • Council may study ride-sharing impact on taxi medallion values
  • Cab owners say they’re in dire straits and need city’s rescue




Uber's License in London Is Revoked

A week after London moved to revoke Uber Technologies Inc.’s operating license, the company and its electronic ride-hailing competitors are feeling the heat in New York as city officials consider moves to regulate and control the industry.

The City Council on Monday was considering a six-month study of Uber’s impact on the traditional yellow cab business, where the value of medallions -- licenses to operate taxis -- has dropped by 90 percent in the past four years. Medallion owners and some council members say the city shouldn’t have allowed companies like Uber and Lyft to operate in New York without applying the same fees and regulations.

The taxi owners are pushing for officials to rescue their industry. They are emboldened by London’s move to ban Uber’s 40,000 drivers amid company failures to do adequate driver background checks.

“If the competition continues to insist on playing by a different set of rules, then New York should simply follow London and tell Uber to hit the road,” said Richard Lipsky, a spokesman for the Taxi Medallion Owners and Drivers Association, an organization that he says includes more than 6,000 immigrants.

Uber Campaign
The last attempt at regulating the mobile ride-hailing companies ended badly for Mayor Bill de Blasio, who failed to limit the vehicles’ increasing presence on Manhattan’s clogged streets. The mayor backed down after Uber ran a multi-million-dollar television and social-media ad campaign that accused him of taking jobs from cab-driving immigrants, whom the mayor has considered part of his political base.

Taxi license owners also count themselves as losers and victims of Uber’s rise. Medallion Financial Corp., a public company specializing in taxi-medallion financing, has seen its stock drop to $2.13 Monday from a high of $17.74 in November 2013. Last month, MGPE Inc., a hedge fund, bought 46 medallions out of foreclosure for about $200,000 each including fees, according to Medallion Financial President Andrew Murstein. That’s down from an all-time high of about $1.3 million four years ago, Murstein said.

Yellow cab operators are subject to the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission regulations governing driver qualifications and cab operations. That includes prohibitions on phone use, which don’t apply to electronic-hail drivers. While yellow cabs are restricted to about 13,600 in New York City, there’s no limit on how many Uber and Lyft cars may cruise city streets.

Crowded Streets
Before the advent of the app-based ride-sharing industry, there were about 38,000 vehicles for hire on the streets. Now there are about 110,000 cars competing for riders, and city officials say they expect 35,000 more within a year.
And typewriter Manufacturers want computers banned.

Coke wants Pepsi banned.

After London Bans Uber, New York Weighs Limits to Help Cabbies
By
Henry Goldman
September 25, 2017, 1:02 PM PDT
  • Council may study ride-sharing impact on taxi medallion values
  • Cab owners say they’re in dire straits and need city’s rescue




Uber's License in London Is Revoked

A week after London moved to revoke Uber Technologies Inc.’s operating license, the company and its electronic ride-hailing competitors are feeling the heat in New York as city officials consider moves to regulate and control the industry.

The City Council on Monday was considering a six-month study of Uber’s impact on the traditional yellow cab business, where the value of medallions -- licenses to operate taxis -- has dropped by 90 percent in the past four years. Medallion owners and some council members say the city shouldn’t have allowed companies like Uber and Lyft to operate in New York without applying the same fees and regulations.

The taxi owners are pushing for officials to rescue their industry. They are emboldened by London’s move to ban Uber’s 40,000 drivers amid company failures to do adequate driver background checks.

“If the competition continues to insist on playing by a different set of rules, then New York should simply follow London and tell Uber to hit the road,” said Richard Lipsky, a spokesman for the Taxi Medallion Owners and Drivers Association, an organization that he says includes more than 6,000 immigrants.

Uber Campaign
The last attempt at regulating the mobile ride-hailing companies ended badly for Mayor Bill de Blasio, who failed to limit the vehicles’ increasing presence on Manhattan’s clogged streets. The mayor backed down after Uber ran a multi-million-dollar television and social-media ad campaign that accused him of taking jobs from cab-driving immigrants, whom the mayor has considered part of his political base.

Taxi license owners also count themselves as losers and victims of Uber’s rise. Medallion Financial Corp., a public company specializing in taxi-medallion financing, has seen its stock drop to $2.13 Monday from a high of $17.74 in November 2013. Last month, MGPE Inc., a hedge fund, bought 46 medallions out of foreclosure for about $200,000 each including fees, according to Medallion Financial President Andrew Murstein. That’s down from an all-time high of about $1.3 million four years ago, Murstein said.

Yellow cab operators are subject to the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission regulations governing driver qualifications and cab operations. That includes prohibitions on phone use, which don’t apply to electronic-hail drivers. While yellow cabs are restricted to about 13,600 in New York City, there’s no limit on how many Uber and Lyft cars may cruise city streets.

Crowded Streets
Before the advent of the app-based ride-sharing industry, there were about 38,000 vehicles for hire on the streets. Now there are about 110,000 cars competing for riders, and city officials say they expect 35,000 more within a year.
You got any more of those " RENT CONTROLLED APARTMENTS" i could sublet ?
 

Mike78

Well-Known Member
I would say : LA's marker is a different than others because in London, NY, Paris... pretty great public transportation system as an alternative I mean if people want to go to bar or club they can take public transportation easy, but in LA you have to have take cab or Uber cuz DUI will be more expensive ...
Other point I've seen in other countries price between Taxi and Uber like 50-30% different, in Los Angeles 300%
 

Kodyhead

Well-Known Member
I would say : LA's marker is a different than others because in London, NY, Paris... pretty great public transportation system as an alternative I mean if people want to go to bar or club they can take public transportation easy, but in LA you have to have take cab or Uber cuz DUI will be more expensive ...
Other point I've seen in other countries price between Taxi and Uber like 50-30% different, in Los Angeles 300%

I agree most markets in the US the regulations are on a state level, NYC and even the surrounding areas are regulated differently and much more heavily but do seem to set the precedent for what goes around the US, and for the most part globally
 

Adieu

Well-Known Member
And UBer/Lyft will tie them up in court with the "we're not a taxi service" spiel until those NYC officials gets tired of slamming their heads against a wall.

Lyft Android app calls itself a TAXI Alternative on Google Play


Uber's Android process is LITERALLY called uberCAB
 

LA Dispatcher

Well-Known Member
Anyone who has the money for a medallian is free to compete..... Most owners only own 1 or a couple......

The free market system works well in AGGREGATE..... its not something that works well in every situation.....

Uber and Lyft have not made the world a better place...... I wish they never existed in the first place to sucker me in....
Not a free market when it's only limited to individuals who can afford medallions. You signed up voluntarily and still log on after all the shenanigans.
 
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KMANDERSON

Well-Known Member
And UBer/Lyft will tie them up in court with the "we're not a taxi service" spiel until those NYC officials gets tired of slamming their heads against a wall.
Our spend five million destroying them with TV and radio Comercials.
 

UberLaLa

Well-Known Member
Not sure what this article is referring to concerning NYC Ubers....they are regulated now. Maybe it means stricter background checks.

Taxi drivers are not the problem...they are no different than us drivers. It's their greedy companies (think Uber/Lyft), Unions and corrupt city officials.
 

arto71

Well-Known Member
After London Bans Uber, New York Weighs Limits to Help Cabbies
By
Henry Goldman
September 25, 2017, 1:02 PM PDT
  • Council may study ride-sharing impact on taxi medallion values
  • Cab owners say they’re in dire straits and need city’s rescue




Uber's License in London Is Revoked

A week after London moved to revoke Uber Technologies Inc.’s operating license, the company and its electronic ride-hailing competitors are feeling the heat in New York as city officials consider moves to regulate and control the industry.

The City Council on Monday was considering a six-month study of Uber’s impact on the traditional yellow cab business, where the value of medallions -- licenses to operate taxis -- has dropped by 90 percent in the past four years. Medallion owners and some council members say the city shouldn’t have allowed companies like Uber and Lyft to operate in New York without applying the same fees and regulations.

The taxi owners are pushing for officials to rescue their industry. They are emboldened by London’s move to ban Uber’s 40,000 drivers amid company failures to do adequate driver background checks.

“If the competition continues to insist on playing by a different set of rules, then New York should simply follow London and tell Uber to hit the road,” said Richard Lipsky, a spokesman for the Taxi Medallion Owners and Drivers Association, an organization that he says includes more than 6,000 immigrants.

Uber Campaign
The last attempt at regulating the mobile ride-hailing companies ended badly for Mayor Bill de Blasio, who failed to limit the vehicles’ increasing presence on Manhattan’s clogged streets. The mayor backed down after Uber ran a multi-million-dollar television and social-media ad campaign that accused him of taking jobs from cab-driving immigrants, whom the mayor has considered part of his political base.

Taxi license owners also count themselves as losers and victims of Uber’s rise. Medallion Financial Corp., a public company specializing in taxi-medallion financing, has seen its stock drop to $2.13 Monday from a high of $17.74 in November 2013. Last month, MGPE Inc., a hedge fund, bought 46 medallions out of foreclosure for about $200,000 each including fees, according to Medallion Financial President Andrew Murstein. That’s down from an all-time high of about $1.3 million four years ago, Murstein said.

Yellow cab operators are subject to the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission regulations governing driver qualifications and cab operations. That includes prohibitions on phone use, which don’t apply to electronic-hail drivers. While yellow cabs are restricted to about 13,600 in New York City, there’s no limit on how many Uber and Lyft cars may cruise city streets.

Crowded Streets
Before the advent of the app-based ride-sharing industry, there were about 38,000 vehicles for hire on the streets. Now there are about 110,000 cars competing for riders, and city officials say they expect 35,000 more within a year.
Uber says will cease operations in Quebec over new rules
http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/uber-cease-operations-quebec-rules-50103192
Uber said Tuesday it will cease operations in Quebec next month if the province doesn't rescind new rules it introduced last week.

Quebec Uber boss Jean-Nicolas Guillemette said it will stop operating on Oct. 14 if the government doesn't back down.

Transport Minister Laurent Lessard said Friday the province would allow Uber to continue to operate if Uber drivers get background checks that are performed by police instead of private security firms. Uber drivers will also be required to undergo the same number of training hours as traditional taxi drivers, which is 35 hours, instead of 20 hours.

Guillemette said the province didn't consult with the company before introducing the new rules. He said it makes it impossible for the service to continue in Quebec.

The announcement did not go over well in Quebec.

"I don't care," Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre told BNN news channels. "Frankly we need to have some regulation and if they threaten to leave I don't care."
 

somedriverguy

Well-Known Member
Uber says will cease operations in Quebec over new rules
http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/uber-cease-operations-quebec-rules-50103192
Uber said Tuesday it will cease operations in Quebec next month if the province doesn't rescind new rules it introduced last week.

Quebec Uber boss Jean-Nicolas Guillemette said it will stop operating on Oct. 14 if the government doesn't back down.

Transport Minister Laurent Lessard said Friday the province would allow Uber to continue to operate if Uber drivers get background checks that are performed by police instead of private security firms. Uber drivers will also be required to undergo the same number of training hours as traditional taxi drivers, which is 35 hours, instead of 20 hours.

Guillemette said the province didn't consult with the company before introducing the new rules. He said it makes it impossible for the service to continue in Quebec.

The announcement did not go over well in Quebec.

"I don't care," Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre told BNN news channels. "Frankly we need to have some regulation and if they threaten to leave I don't care."
I like the way the UBER exec admits/assumes that none of his contractors can pass a police run background check, or could pass 35 hours of training. Would it suck? Sure. Would it be impossible? Not bloody likely.

Total tool.
 

LoveBC

Well-Known Member
Uber says will cease operations in Quebec over new rules
http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/uber-cease-operations-quebec-rules-50103192
Uber said Tuesday it will cease operations in Quebec next month if the province doesn't rescind new rules it introduced last week.

Quebec Uber boss Jean-Nicolas Guillemette said it will stop operating on Oct. 14 if the government doesn't back down.

Transport Minister Laurent Lessard said Friday the province would allow Uber to continue to operate if Uber drivers get background checks that are performed by police instead of private security firms. Uber drivers will also be required to undergo the same number of training hours as traditional taxi drivers, which is 35 hours, instead of 20 hours.

Guillemette said the province didn't consult with the company before introducing the new rules. He said it makes it impossible for the service to continue in Quebec.

The announcement did not go over well in Quebec.

"I don't care," Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre told BNN news channels. "Frankly we need to have some regulation and if they threaten to leave I don't care."
Good for that mayor. Don't let the door hit them in the ass, or let it whatever!
 

Ride-Share-Risk-Manager

Well-Known Member
Uber says will cease operations in Quebec over new rules
http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/uber-cease-operations-quebec-rules-50103192
Uber said Tuesday it will cease operations in Quebec next month if the province doesn't rescind new rules it introduced last week.

Quebec Uber boss Jean-Nicolas Guillemette said it will stop operating on Oct. 14 if the government doesn't back down.

Transport Minister Laurent Lessard said Friday the province would allow Uber to continue to operate if Uber drivers get background checks that are performed by police instead of private security firms. Uber drivers will also be required to undergo the same number of training hours as traditional taxi drivers, which is 35 hours, instead of 20 hours.

Guillemette said the province didn't consult with the company before introducing the new rules. He said it makes it impossible for the service to continue in Quebec.

The announcement did not go over well in Quebec.

"I don't care," Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre told BNN news channels. "Frankly we need to have some regulation and if they threaten to leave I don't care."

I am glad to see that some politicians are actually growing some balls and backbone and saying no to Uber and Lyft. All of these cities functioned just fine before Uber or Lyft came along and they will do just fine if they cease to exist tomorrow.
 
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