Engine Degreasing

Bill Collector

Well-Known Member
I've looked some YouTube videos.. Doesn't look all that complicated but I don't have pressure hose for water. Not do I have blower to dry. Anyone have experience degreasing with good old bucket offer water? The section near water pump is pretty greasy.
IMG_20160630_115645-640x475.jpg
Thanks.
 

Gung-Ho

Well-Known Member
Don't you have a self serve car wash near you? They offer a degreaser option just spray it on wait a minute or two then high pressure rinse it off. I supposed a garden hose would work just as well too. Not sure why it's important to blow dry it. Drive it around for a little bit the heat from the engine will do the trick.
 

LAuberX

Well-Known Member
Moderator
best not to do it.... water in electrical connections can lead to problems.

High pressure water can force it's way inside oil seals.... they are designed to keep oil in, not high pressure out.

if it drips on the ground something needs to be fixed... otherwise close the hood and forget it.
 

Frontier Guy

Well-Known Member
Go to your local auto parts store, get a can of Gunk, Gumout or similar engine degreaser, some even list as being environmentally friendly. Follow directions, rinse with garden hose, works like a charm. I go my pickup and the wife's car every couple of months.

DO NOT USE UNDILUTED SIMPLE GREEN or SIMILAR PRODUCTS MADE BY CASTROL, it will stain/discolor plastic engine parts and may cause damage to belts and hoses.
 

sophiagrace

New Member
You hold which car. It will be better if you visit some service center, as they are well aware i this field, you must visit them.
 

Gung-Ho

Well-Known Member
best not to do it.... water in electrical connections can lead to problems.

High pressure water can force it's way inside oil seals.... they are designed to keep oil in, not high pressure out.
All you do is rinse off the degreasing gunk you don't have to blast away at the engine like you're removing barnacles from the hull of a boat
 

LAuberX

Well-Known Member
Moderator
All you do is rinse off the degreasing gunk you don't have to blast away at the engine like you're removing barnacles from the hull of a boat
getting water in places water was never intended to be introduced is a bad idea.

telling a non mechanic to spray solvents/water on an engine is not good advice, sorry.
 

JimS

Well-Known Member
I'm an aircraft mechanic/engineer.

Low pressure (or high pressure, without pulling the trigger) is fine. Use engine degreaser from Autozone (with your Uber discount) or Advanced (with your Lyft discount). Spray on, rinse off.

My suggestion is that you leave your engine running while doing this. You may suck in water which, when the engine is running, will likely heave a bit, but if you get water in the engine when its off, it may be harder to start.

Also, if a belt starts to squeal when wet, don't worry too much, but it may be time to replace it or give it a little tightening.
 

Frontier Guy

Well-Known Member
getting water in places water was never intended to be introduced is a bad idea.

telling a non mechanic to spray solvents/water on an engine is not good advice, sorry.
Um, then that is the scariest person on the face of the planet, and I want them to leave
 

EcoboostMKS

Well-Known Member
Cover the alternator and fuse boxes with plastic bags. Spray a degreaser (i like purple power) and lightly scrub. Rinse with a very light hosing - DO NOT POWER WASH! Blow dry with either compressed air or a leaf blower. Do not spray water on a hot engine! I'd make sure that engine has been off for at least a couple hours.
 

EcoboostMKS

Well-Known Member
getting water in places water was never intended to be introduced is a bad idea.

telling a non mechanic to spray solvents/water on an engine is not good advice, sorry.
Always best to check the owner's manual first. I know for my current car, they tell you exactly what you need to cover and that it's safe to clean the engine bay. I just did it a couple weeks ago for my car with no issues.
 

Frontier Guy

Well-Known Member
Cover the alternator and fuse boxes with plastic bags. Spray a degreaser (i like purple power) and lightly scrub. Rinse with a very light hosing - DO NOT POWER WASH! Blow dry with either compressed air or a leaf blower. Do not spray water on a hot engine! I'd make sure that engine has been off for at least a couple hours.
Actually, vehicles built in the last 20 yrs, you don't need to cover anything, alternators, fuse blocks are designed to get wet, they get splash/spray from snow, ice, rain, car washes all the time. No need to blow dry, and depending on the engine degreaser used, will determine engine temp. Some prefer a cold engine, some prefer a warm engine, all will tell you to shut the engine off and let cool briefly before spraying. I have GUNK Degreaser that tells you to warm a cold engine for 5 to 10 minutes before spraying, to allow the grease/gunk to become pliable.
 

wk1102

Well-Known Member
Gunk is shit! As others have said, spray it on a warm engine , let sit, rinse with LOW pressure, a garden hose will work. I keep engine running, i use an air compressor to blow any puddled water.
 

Bill Collector

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #17
Seems like gunk cleaner did a wonderful job so far with just a bucket of water.. I still need to go through second round to clear up remaining residue. After picture below:
IMG_20160708_121753-320x237.jpg
 
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