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Earning more tips as a driver

Earning more tips as a Lyft/Uber driver without spending a penny

314645


Drivers all want to earn more tips, without doing anything or spending much to achieve them. Everyone is looking for that “magic bullet” that is going to help them achieve greater tips. What is the secret formula? Is it giving away water or candy? What kind of candy? Putting up a sign? Putting out a tip jar of some kind? Telling people to remember to tip you? Complaining to every passenger (pax) about your pay?

314644


Anyone who has put in any serious time in a service job knows that those are not the way to go. They may help (usually not), but the real difference between someone tipping you, or tipping more than they would normally, comes from within YOU. It's your personality that makes the difference! The person needs to feel that they appreciate the driver and/or the ride, as opposed to just having another zombie take them from point A to point B. So here are some pointers for those of you who don’t have a lot of customer service or sales experience.


Truth vs Reality

Truth: Our job is to drive people from A to B safely, and THAT'S IT.

Reality: Driving from A to B is your JOB. You are paid for your job. If you want pax to go above and beyond (give tips), then you need to go above and beyond somehow.


Make it about them

Human beings like to talk about themselves, in general. There are exceptions of course. The first thing you need to do is recognize whether someone is open to conversation or not. If they are buried in their phone or have headphones on, that is a sign to keep your mouth shut and leave them alone. If there are multiple people and they are engaged in their own conversation, try not to interrupt.

If the pax is just sitting there, try to get them talking about themselves by asking questions. Understand that there are certain topics that are off limits in society, such as relationships, politics, religion and how much money people make. Avoid those topics! Keep the conversations general, and ask questions instead of giving your opinion. Some questions to ask:
  • Do you take a lot of Uber/Lyft?
  • Have you had any crazy drivers? Ooh, tell me about it!
  • How long have you lived in this area/where are you from?
  • (for out-of-towners) What brings you into town this weekend?
  • (for students) What are you studying? Why did you choose that field?
  • Have you got any big plans for the week/weekend/holiday?
  • What do you think about all the bikes/scooters/traffic around here?
  • (for out-of-towners) What do you think are the biggest differences between your city/state and here?
  • (if going to a bar/restaurant) Have you been to this place before? What’s good there?
  • I have been thinking of getting a new phone, what kind do you have? What do you like about it?
  • I was considering taking a little time off and heading (north/south) but not sure where to go, any suggestions?
  • I just got this vehicle a few months ago, seems to be okay. How's the ride so far? Not too bumpy or noisy, is it?
Once again, avoid giving your opinion, unless it is about local restaurants and such. It is extremely tempting to chime in when someone tells you their thoughts, try to avoid “being the expert” if possible. If you give an opinion that they don’t agree with, they will simply stop talking and there goes your tip. Try to keep your opinions to yourself (until you get good at this).


Avoid complaining

314647


This is a tough one, because a little complaining is normal, but too much makes you sound like a whiny crybaby. A simple “Traffic sucks” is acceptable, but going on and on about how you got stuck in a 45 minute parking lot that used to be called the highway is annoying to the listener. Note: when a pax complains, they don’t see it as complaining. They see it as conversation. Let them complain all they want.

The definition of ‘complaining’ is a matter of personal opinion. Suppose a pax asks you how you like driving for U/L. You answer that it’s great, but the money could be a lot better, or you wish the companies would stop trying to manipulate drivers. They ask what you mean, and this turns into an explanation on your part, and from your perspective you are simply informing the customer (after all, they asked, didn’t they?) but from their point of view you are just whining about your job. You need to find that proper balance.


Avoid negative stories and sex stories

Pax love a good story! But what is “good”? Stories that involve sex or anything with sexual physical contact should be avoided right away. They may be good stories to tell your buddies over drinks, but not to pax. Trust me on this one! TMI is bad. Pax want a story, but they don’t want to know about your private encounters with other people, passengers or otherwise.

When the pax leaves your car, you want them to leave with a positive feeling about you, about the ride, about the entire experience. If the last thing that goes into their brain is something about vomit or how you treated someone else poorly, that leaves a negative impression. You may think it's a great idea because they will feel sorry for you and tip better, but that's not how it works out in real life.

Try to tell stories where you don’t offend any particular person or group. Avoid the story where you almost got into a fight with a bicyclist, or you kicked the woman with a fake service dog out of your car. You may have been in the right, but those stories will backfire on you!


Avoid --isms


314648


Here is a big one: avoid sentences that stereotype people. No racism, sexism, ageism, or any other form of discrimination. If your sentence starts with “I’m not racist, but….” then just don’t say it. You never know when the person you are talking to has a best friend or parent or lover who loves/is a foster child, white, Mexican, gay, Trump supporter, Muslim, Jewish, age 70+, on welfare, or whatever! Replace “one time I picked up this white guy” with “one time I picked up this guy”.

Think about how you describe people. Stop calling women “chicks”. Stop calling men “dudes”. Stop referring to people as “kids” or “old” people. Ask yourself if the age or skin color or religion of the person in the story is really relevant, or could you tell the story without it.

If you are just absolutely horrible at storytelling, then read some UP articles and use a feel-good story, after deleting the ---isms. Make sure it has a passenger-positive vibe to it!


Have a positive mindset

Ever heard the saying that “you get what you give”? This has 100% to do with your mindset and your emotional state of being. If you have a chip on your shoulder, you shouldn’t be driving people around. If you are in a great mood, it will rub off on others and that translates into better tips, believe it or not!

In between rides, DO NOT read message boards, the news, or political articles. Avoid talk radio. Why? There is a lot of negativity in all of the above, and it will mess with you mentally and emotionally. When people are thinking about negative things, they expect negative things to happen, and guess what – their view of each encounter will focus on the negative aspects! Avoid filling your mind with the negative. Just leave it out of your car until your shift is over. Trust me, the problems of the world will still be there waiting for you when you are done driving.

In between rides, turn on your favorite music and CRANK IT!! When you arrive, don’t just turn the music down, turn it off. Your song will be stuck in your head, and you will be driving along with your foot tapping, thumb tapping the wheel, and in a better mood to talk to people. Pax will pick up on your good attitude and maybe want to talk with their happy driver who is in a good mood.


Physical health

Keep yourself watered and fed. If you are overly hungry, low blood sugar makes you cranky. If you have to pee all the time, you will be impatient and not really paying attention to what the pax is saying. Too much Red Bull and you are a jabbering moron. Once again, keep yourself healthy and POSITIVE instead of NEGATIVE.


What motivates people to tip?

I want you to think about your favorite restaurants, your favorite bars, your favorite event centers, and so on. Places where you look forward to going and spending money. Got ‘em? Great. Now, is Walmart on the list? Is McDonald’s on the list? NO???? Why not, they are the cheapest prices, right? So many customers served, doesn’t everyone love Taco Bell and Dollar Store?

Ask yourself WHY you like your favorite places. What makes them special? What makes them draw you in? Is it because of the exceptionally low prices? Is it because they offer you free candy or a mint? Is it because they have a sign that says “We hope you enjoy yourself, tips are appreciated”? No, no, and no.

You enjoy your favorite places because: you feel comfortable being there. You enjoy hanging with friends because: you feel comfortable. When people are comfortable and at ease, they have no problem spending money (or being charitable in other ways). People are drawn to Uber for the low prices and convenience, but they tip for the extras that cannot be purchased at a store. If you want more tips, make your personality such that people feel comfortable and at ease in your presence.

That does not mean everyone will tip, obviously. Some people won’t tip no matter what. Others are seriously too poor at the moment. That’s just how it is! But you don’t know who those people are in advance. You can take educated guesses, but you never really know for sure.


Come from a place of contribution

As time goes on and we have negative driver experiences, we brace ourselves mentally for future rides, expecting the worst. What we expect is often what we see. This next piece of advice is going to sound batshit crazy (especially to seasoned drivers) but try it out for a couple days or nights and see if you notice a difference in your tips.

Have a giving mindset. Start each ride by asking yourself how you can help the pax. What can you do to make their encounter just a little bit better, without going off the deep end. It could be something simple, like pulling up a little closer to the door to pick them up, or recommending a good restaurant. Maybe helping with luggage – not because of the fender scratch factor, but because it might make their day easier. When the ride is over, remind them to check for things left behind, like their phone. Sometimes the little simple things are what people appreciate the most!

Be cautious about giving advice however. When you are “helping” people, remember that if they don’t appreciate it, it isn’t considered help. People don’t want to be told how they should run their lives, their relationships, how they should vote or worship. That advice may be helpful in your eyes, but intrusive and unwanted in theirs. Help them in ways that THEY would appreciate. Wish them a pleasant weekend. Wish them a stress free day.

When a pax takes 4 minutes to get in the car, or smells like french fry grease, and you want to turn around and punch them in the nose, instead make the effort to look at yourself in the mirror and smile. Then treat the pax as if it was no big deal. Treat them well. You can still 1* them later if you want, lol. But being courteous to people even when they piss you off can go a long ways towards better tips.

In a nutshell, be nicer to people, despite their flaws.

314646



Good luck!

If all of the above doesn’t work, best of luck with the tip jar and cheesy sign. I look forward to hearing from those of you have noticed a money difference using some of the above suggestions.
 
Mr T

The Gift of Fish

Well-Known Member
Good advice. However, I prefer pax to get in, buckle up and then STFU. Especially right at the begining of my day at 4am. I prefer not to talk to pax at all. I don't care where they are from, what they are doing in the city, where they are going etc etc.

Having said that, I do get some good tips. These come mostly from people on distance trips. I get a lot of comments for good (safe) driving, city knowledge and clean car. I've also had a few comments along the lines of "Didn't make me feel like I had to have a conversation with him" and "Thanks for the quiet ride". These things all seem to matter a lot and probably are factors in tipping.
 

Mista T

Well-Known Member
Author
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #42
Good advice. However, I prefer pax to get in, buckle up and then STFU. Especially right at the begining of my day at 4am. I prefer not to talk to pax at all. I don't care where they are from, what they are doing in the city, where they are going etc etc.

Having said that, I do get some good tips. These come mostly from people on distance trips. I get a lot of comments for good (safe) driving, city knowledge and clean car. I've also had a few comments along the lines of "Didn't make me feel like I had to have a conversation with him" and "Thanks for the quiet ride". These things all seem to matter a lot and probably are factors in tipping.
It's all about successfully reading your customer, and giving them the experience that they want (if possible).
 

Mudnana

New Member
Earning more tips as a Lyft/Uber driver without spending a penny

View attachment 314645

Drivers all want to earn more tips, without doing anything or spending much to achieve them. Everyone is looking for that “magic bullet” that is going to help them achieve greater tips. What is the secret formula? Is it giving away water or candy? What kind of candy? Putting up a sign? Putting out a tip jar of some kind? Telling people to remember to tip you? Complaining to every passenger (pax) about your pay?

View attachment 314644

Anyone who has put in any serious time in a service job knows that those are not the way to go. They may help (usually not), but the real difference between someone tipping you, or tipping more than they would normally, comes from within YOU. It's your personality that makes the difference! The person needs to feel that they appreciate the driver and/or the ride, as opposed to just having another zombie take them from point A to point B. So here are some pointers for those of you who don’t have a lot of customer service or sales experience.


Truth vs Reality

Truth: Our job is to drive people from A to B safely, and THAT'S IT.

Reality: Driving from A to B is your JOB. You are paid for your job. If you want pax to go above and beyond (give tips), then you need to go above and beyond somehow.


Make it about them

Human beings like to talk about themselves, in general. There are exceptions of course. The first thing you need to do is recognize whether someone is open to conversation or not. If they are buried in their phone or have headphones on, that is a sign to keep your mouth shut and leave them alone. If there are multiple people and they are engaged in their own conversation, try not to interrupt.

If the pax is just sitting there, try to get them talking about themselves by asking questions. Understand that there are certain topics that are off limits in society, such as relationships, politics, religion and how much money people make. Avoid those topics! Keep the conversations general, and ask questions instead of giving your opinion. Some questions to ask:
  • Do you take a lot of Uber/Lyft?
  • Have you had any crazy drivers? Ooh, tell me about it!
  • How long have you lived in this area/where are you from?
  • (for out-of-towners) What brings you into town this weekend?
  • (for students) What are you studying? Why did you choose that field?
  • Have you got any big plans for the week/weekend/holiday?
  • What do you think about all the bikes/scooters/traffic around here?
  • (for out-of-towners) What do you think are the biggest differences between your city/state and here?
  • (if going to a bar/restaurant) Have you been to this place before? What’s good there?
  • I have been thinking of getting a new phone, what kind do you have? What do you like about it?
  • I was considering taking a little time off and heading (north/south) but not sure where to go, any suggestions?
  • I just got this vehicle a few months ago, seems to be okay. How's the ride so far? Not too bumpy or noisy, is it?
Once again, avoid giving your opinion, unless it is about local restaurants and such. It is extremely tempting to chime in when someone tells you their thoughts, try to avoid “being the expert” if possible. If you give an opinion that they don’t agree with, they will simply stop talking and there goes your tip. Try to keep your opinions to yourself (until you get good at this).


Avoid complaining

View attachment 314647

This is a tough one, because a little complaining is normal, but too much makes you sound like a whiny crybaby. A simple “Traffic sucks” is acceptable, but going on and on about how you got stuck in a 45 minute parking lot that used to be called the highway is annoying to the listener. Note: when a pax complains, they don’t see it as complaining. They see it as conversation. Let them complain all they want.

The definition of ‘complaining’ is a matter of personal opinion. Suppose a pax asks you how you like driving for U/L. You answer that it’s great, but the money could be a lot better, or you wish the companies would stop trying to manipulate drivers. They ask what you mean, and this turns into an explanation on your part, and from your perspective you are simply informing the customer (after all, they asked, didn’t they?) but from their point of view you are just whining about your job. You need to find that proper balance.


Avoid negative stories and sex stories

Pax love a good story! But what is “good”? Stories that involve sex or anything with sexual physical contact should be avoided right away. They may be good stories to tell your buddies over drinks, but not to pax. Trust me on this one! TMI is bad. Pax want a story, but they don’t want to know about your private encounters with other people, passengers or otherwise.

When the pax leaves your car, you want them to leave with a positive feeling about you, about the ride, about the entire experience. If the last thing that goes into their brain is something about vomit or how you treated someone else poorly, that leaves a negative impression. You may think it's a great idea because they will feel sorry for you and tip better, but that's not how it works out in real life.

Try to tell stories where you don’t offend any particular person or group. Avoid the story where you almost got into a fight with a bicyclist, or you kicked the woman with a fake service dog out of your car. You may have been in the right, but those stories will backfire on you!


Avoid --isms


View attachment 314648

Here is a big one: avoid sentences that stereotype people. No racism, sexism, ageism, or any other form of discrimination. If your sentence starts with “I’m not racist, but….” then just don’t say it. You never know when the person you are talking to has a best friend or parent or lover who loves/is a foster child, white, Mexican, gay, Trump supporter, Muslim, Jewish, age 70+, on welfare, or whatever! Replace “one time I picked up this white guy” with “one time I picked up this guy”.

Think about how you describe people. Stop calling women “chicks”. Stop calling men “dudes”. Stop referring to people as “kids” or “old” people. Ask yourself if the age or skin color or religion of the person in the story is really relevant, or could you tell the story without it.

If you are just absolutely horrible at storytelling, then read some UP articles and use a feel-good story, after deleting the ---isms. Make sure it has a passenger-positive vibe to it!


Have a positive mindset

Ever heard the saying that “you get what you give”? This has 100% to do with your mindset and your emotional state of being. If you have a chip on your shoulder, you shouldn’t be driving people around. If you are in a great mood, it will rub off on others and that translates into better tips, believe it or not!

In between rides, DO NOT read message boards, the news, or political articles. Avoid talk radio. Why? There is a lot of negativity in all of the above, and it will mess with you mentally and emotionally. When people are thinking about negative things, they expect negative things to happen, and guess what – their view of each encounter will focus on the negative aspects! Avoid filling your mind with the negative. Just leave it out of your car until your shift is over. Trust me, the problems of the world will still be there waiting for you when you are done driving.

In between rides, turn on your favorite music and CRANK IT!! When you arrive, don’t just turn the music down, turn it off. Your song will be stuck in your head, and you will be driving along with your foot tapping, thumb tapping the wheel, and in a better mood to talk to people. Pax will pick up on your good attitude and maybe want to talk with their happy driver who is in a good mood.


Physical health

Keep yourself watered and fed. If you are overly hungry, low blood sugar makes you cranky. If you have to pee all the time, you will be impatient and not really paying attention to what the pax is saying. Too much Red Bull and you are a jabbering moron. Once again, keep yourself healthy and POSITIVE instead of NEGATIVE.


What motivates people to tip?

I want you to think about your favorite restaurants, your favorite bars, your favorite event centers, and so on. Places where you look forward to going and spending money. Got ‘em? Great. Now, is Walmart on the list? Is McDonald’s on the list? NO???? Why not, they are the cheapest prices, right? So many customers served, doesn’t everyone love Taco Bell and Dollar Store?

Ask yourself WHY you like your favorite places. What makes them special? What makes them draw you in? Is it because of the exceptionally low prices? Is it because they offer you free candy or a mint? Is it because they have a sign that says “We hope you enjoy yourself, tips are appreciated”? No, no, and no.

You enjoy your favorite places because: you feel comfortable being there. You enjoy hanging with friends because: you feel comfortable. When people are comfortable and at ease, they have no problem spending money (or being charitable in other ways). People are drawn to Uber for the low prices and convenience, but they tip for the extras that cannot be purchased at a store. If you want more tips, make your personality such that people feel comfortable and at ease in your presence.

That does not mean everyone will tip, obviously. Some people won’t tip no matter what. Others are seriously too poor at the moment. That’s just how it is! But you don’t know who those people are in advance. You can take educated guesses, but you never really know for sure.


Come from a place of contribution

As time goes on and we have negative driver experiences, we brace ourselves mentally for future rides, expecting the worst. What we expect is often what we see. This next piece of advice is going to sound batshit crazy (especially to seasoned drivers) but try it out for a couple days or nights and see if you notice a difference in your tips.

Have a giving mindset. Start each ride by asking yourself how you can help the pax. What can you do to make their encounter just a little bit better, without going off the deep end. It could be something simple, like pulling up a little closer to the door to pick them up, or recommending a good restaurant. Maybe helping with luggage – not because of the fender scratch factor, but because it might make their day easier. When the ride is over, remind them to check for things left behind, like their phone. Sometimes the little simple things are what people appreciate the most!

Be cautious about giving advice however. When you are “helping” people, remember that if they don’t appreciate it, it isn’t considered help. People don’t want to be told how they should run their lives, their relationships, how they should vote or worship. That advice may be helpful in your eyes, but intrusive and unwanted in theirs. Help them in ways that THEY would appreciate. Wish them a pleasant weekend. Wish them a stress free day.

When a pax takes 4 minutes to get in the car, or smells like french fry grease, and you want to turn around and punch them in the nose, instead make the effort to look at yourself in the mirror and smile. Then treat the pax as if it was no big deal. Treat them well. You can still 1* them later if you want, lol. But being courteous to people even when they piss you off can go a long ways towards better tips.

In a nutshell, be nicer to people, despite their flaws.

View attachment 314646


Good luck!

If all of the above doesn’t work, best of luck with the tip jar and cheesy sign. I look forward to hearing from those of you have noticed a money difference using some of the above suggestions.
You must learn to read your pax. I start with a question- how is your day going? Was that a good concert? How was your dinner? If they are in a chatty mood it will quickly become clear.
If the answer is quick and they bury their face in their phone they probably want a quiet ride. I consistently get the best tips ($20, $50, and even $100) on early morning (3 or 4 AM) airport rides ... 25 minutes of silence. I make sure that the ride is smooth and the pax appreciates the extra sleep.
I wake them as I enter the airport property by softly asking "which airline?"
No entertainment factor at all.
Post automatically merged:

You must learn to read your pax. I start with a question- how is your day going? Was that a good concert? How was your dinner? If they are in a chatty mood it will quickly become clear.
If the answer is quick and they bury their face in their phone they probably want a quiet ride. I consistently get the best tips ($20, $50, and even $100) on early morning (3 or 4 AM) airport rides ... 25 minutes of silence. I make sure that the ride is smooth and the pax appreciates the extra sleep.
I wake them as I enter the airport property by softly asking "which airline?"
No entertainment factor at all.
That said... a rowdy sweet caroline or piano man sing along can be a blast!
 

Derek Norstadt

New Member
Just remember this:

You don't tip your friends.

If you try to make the pax your buddy, you probably won't get a tip. The waiter/tress isn't your buddy, the doorman isn't, the maid isn't. These are all service industry jobs. So focus on that. Providing a good, professional service. They aren't your friend, and probably don't want to be.

If they see you as a service provider, such as above, your tip % will go up. And yes, there are outliers to this, as there are with everything.
 

Authority

Well-Known Member
I live in California and pretty much everyone HATES Trump so that's always a good conversation.

I had one Trump supporter I can recall... and she tipped me.
 

Amos69

Well-Known Member
The job of a barber is to just cut your hair. Right? Yet 90+ % tip

The job of a waitress is to get you food, Right? And yet 90% + tip

I love the article, and most of it is correct, but culture has much to blame for it.
That's exactly it right there.

You cannot control what happens with strangers when they are not with you, you are not there. You can however influence what people you do not know do when that are with you. Nothing is ever always something, but when you focus on the things you can control you can often create favorable results.
 

BigRedDriver

Well-Known Member
That's exactly it right there.

You cannot control what happens with strangers when they are not with you, you are not there. You can however influence what people you do not know do when that are with you. Nothing is ever always something, but when you focus on the things you can control you can often create favorable results.
Yesterday on 177 revenue. $34.00 tips

Today on 170 revenue. $4.00 tips

Go figure.
 

Phantomshark

Active Member
Good article as far as what to talk about goes, but this will mean bupkis as far as tips go, other than if you hit a hot button topic and piss someone off you may losd a tip. Its all about changing the mindset. Back when Uber was paying us a living wage, they told pax tips weren't allowed. Then Lyft came along with lower rates but allowed tipping to make up for it. So Uber said 'Ok, we're gonna pay you less, but allow people to tip to make up the difference'. Problem was, they had already trained the pax not to tip, so now changing the culture is hard, and they even have some drivers brainwashed into thinking they should not be tipped, because 'tipping is not REQUIRED'. Well, tipping a waitress is not 'required' either, but customers would not dream of not leaving one. That's the culture we need to get to, and the focus needs to be how to get pax to realize we need the tips to stay in business, and not these shill drivers saying 'If you want tips find another job' or something equally helpful.
 

I_Like_Spam

Well-Known Member
Problem was, they had already trained the pax not to tip, so now changing the culture is hard,

This is the reason why ride share drivers don't receive many tips.

Ride Sharing is new. 7 years ago, no one knew what Uber X was. Uber explained that it was a seamless app where people could order a ride on a smart phone without handling cash money at all. Tipping was said right from the start to be unnecessary and Uber bragged that its partners were averaging close to 6 figures in many areas. When fares were reduced, they explained to the general public that this was great news for its drivers, as they would be making even more.

Those who signed up for Uber listened to the spiel and took Uber at their word regarding tipping.

Most of the earliest pax were millennial types who hate to tip anyhow, its a generation of skinflints.

Its going to be tough to turn around.



OTOH, cab passengers were always told that tipping was definitely expected. Your driver is on the bottom strata of society and really needs the money to buy milk for his babies or get his shoes shined to meet his parole agent. He looked rough around the edges and really looked like he needed the money. In a lot of cities, the average cab driver was a hindu or senegalese immigrant. A lot of passengers saw tipping the hack as an act of noblesse oblige.
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
Earning more tips as a Lyft/Uber driver without spending a penny
View attachment 314645
Drivers all want to earn more tips, without doing anything or spending much to achieve them. Everyone is looking for that “magic bullet” that is going to help them achieve greater tips. What is the secret formula? Is it giving away water or candy? What kind of candy? Putting up a sign? Putting out a tip jar of some kind? Telling people to remember to tip you? Complaining to every passenger (pax) about your pay?
View attachment 314644
Anyone who has put in any serious time in a service job knows that those are not the way to go. They may help (usually not), but the real difference between someone tipping you, or tipping more than they would normally, comes from within YOU. It's your personality that makes the difference! The person needs to feel that they appreciate the driver and/or the ride, as opposed to just having another zombie take them from point A to point B. So here are some pointers for those of you who don’t have a lot of customer service or sales experience.
Truth vs Reality
Truth: Our job is to drive people from A to B safely, and THAT'S IT.
Reality: Driving from A to B is your JOB. You are paid for your job. If you want pax to go above and beyond (give tips), then you need to go above and beyond somehow.
Make it about them
Human beings like to talk about themselves, in general. There are exceptions of course. The first thing you need to do is recognize whether someone is open to conversation or not. If they are buried in their phone or have headphones on, that is a sign to keep your mouth shut and leave them alone. If there are multiple people and they are engaged in their own conversation, try not to interrupt.
If the pax is just sitting there, try to get them talking about themselves by asking questions. Understand that there are certain topics that are off limits in society, such as relationships, politics, religion and how much money people make. Avoid those topics! Keep the conversations general, and ask questions instead of giving your opinion. Some questions to ask:
  • Do you take a lot of Uber/Lyft?
  • Have you had any crazy drivers? Ooh, tell me about it!
  • How long have you lived in this area/where are you from?
  • (for out-of-towners) What brings you into town this weekend?
  • (for students) What are you studying? Why did you choose that field?
  • Have you got any big plans for the week/weekend/holiday?
  • What do you think about all the bikes/scooters/traffic around here?
  • (for out-of-towners) What do you think are the biggest differences between your city/state and here?
  • (if going to a bar/restaurant) Have you been to this place before? What’s good there?
  • I have been thinking of getting a new phone, what kind do you have? What do you like about it?
  • I was considering taking a little time off and heading (north/south) but not sure where to go, any suggestions?
  • I just got this vehicle a few months ago, seems to be okay. How's the ride so far? Not too bumpy or noisy, is it?
Once again, avoid giving your opinion, unless it is about local restaurants and such. It is extremely tempting to chime in when someone tells you their thoughts, try to avoid “being the expert” if possible. If you give an opinion that they don’t agree with, they will simply stop talking and there goes your tip. Try to keep your opinions to yourself (until you get good at this).
Avoid complaining
View attachment 314647
This is a tough one, because a little complaining is normal, but too much makes you sound like a whiny crybaby. A simple “Traffic sucks” is acceptable, but going on and on about how you got stuck in a 45 minute parking lot that used to be called the highway is annoying to the listener. Note: when a pax complains, they don’t see it as complaining. They see it as conversation. Let them complain all they want.
The definition of ‘complaining’ is a matter of personal opinion. Suppose a pax asks you how you like driving for U/L. You answer that it’s great, but the money could be a lot better, or you wish the companies would stop trying to manipulate drivers. They ask what you mean, and this turns into an explanation on your part, and from your perspective you are simply informing the customer (after all, they asked, didn’t they?) but from their point of view you are just whining about your job. You need to find that proper balance.
Avoid negative stories and sex stories
Pax love a good story! But what is “good”? Stories that involve sex or anything with sexual physical contact should be avoided right away. They may be good stories to tell your buddies over drinks, but not to pax. Trust me on this one! TMI is bad. Pax want a story, but they don’t want to know about your private encounters with other people, passengers or otherwise.
When the pax leaves your car, you want them to leave with a positive feeling about you, about the ride, about the entire experience. If the last thing that goes into their brain is something about vomit or how you treated someone else poorly, that leaves a negative impression. You may think it's a great idea because they will feel sorry for you and tip better, but that's not how it works out in real life.
Try to tell stories where you don’t offend any particular person or group. Avoid the story where you almost got into a fight with a bicyclist, or you kicked the woman with a fake service dog out of your car. You may have been in the right, but those stories will backfire on you!
Avoid --isms
View attachment 314648
Here is a big one: avoid sentences that stereotype people. No racism, sexism, ageism, or any other form of discrimination. If your sentence starts with “I’m not racist, but….” then just don’t say it. You never know when the person you are talking to has a best friend or parent or lover who loves/is a foster child, white, Mexican, gay, Trump supporter, Muslim, Jewish, age 70+, on welfare, or whatever! Replace “one time I picked up this white guy” with “one time I picked up this guy”.
Think about how you describe people. Stop calling women “chicks”. Stop calling men “dudes”. Stop referring to people as “kids” or “old” people. Ask yourself if the age or skin color or religion of the person in the story is really relevant, or could you tell the story without it.
If you are just absolutely horrible at storytelling, then read some UP articles and use a feel-good story, after deleting the ---isms. Make sure it has a passenger-positive vibe to it!
Have a positive mindset
Ever heard the saying that “you get what you give”? This has 100% to do with your mindset and your emotional state of being. If you have a chip on your shoulder, you shouldn’t be driving people around. If you are in a great mood, it will rub off on others and that translates into better tips, believe it or not!
In between rides, DO NOT read message boards, the news, or political articles. Avoid talk radio. Why? There is a lot of negativity in all of the above, and it will mess with you mentally and emotionally. When people are thinking about negative things, they expect negative things to happen, and guess what – their view of each encounter will focus on the negative aspects! Avoid filling your mind with the negative. Just leave it out of your car until your shift is over. Trust me, the problems of the world will still be there waiting for you when you are done driving.
In between rides, turn on your favorite music and CRANK IT!! When you arrive, don’t just turn the music down, turn it off. Your song will be stuck in your head, and you will be driving along with your foot tapping, thumb tapping the wheel, and in a better mood to talk to people. Pax will pick up on your good attitude and maybe want to talk with their happy driver who is in a good mood.
Physical health
Keep yourself watered and fed. If you are overly hungry, low blood sugar makes you cranky. If you have to pee all the time, you will be impatient and not really paying attention to what the pax is saying. Too much Red Bull and you are a jabbering moron. Once again, keep yourself healthy and POSITIVE instead of NEGATIVE.
What motivates people to tip?
I want you to think about your favorite restaurants, your favorite bars, your favorite event centers, and so on. Places where you look forward to going and spending money. Got ‘em? Great. Now, is Walmart on the list? Is McDonald’s on the list? NO???? Why not, they are the cheapest prices, right? So many customers served, doesn’t everyone love Taco Bell and Dollar Store?
Ask yourself WHY you like your favorite places. What makes them special? What makes them draw you in? Is it because of the exceptionally low prices? Is it because they offer you free candy or a mint? Is it because they have a sign that says “We hope you enjoy yourself, tips are appreciated”? No, no, and no.
You enjoy your favorite places because: you feel comfortable being there. You enjoy hanging with friends because: you feel comfortable. When people are comfortable and at ease, they have no problem spending money (or being charitable in other ways). People are drawn to Uber for the low prices and convenience, but they tip for the extras that cannot be purchased at a store. If you want more tips, make your personality such that people feel comfortable and at ease in your presence.
That does not mean everyone will tip, obviously. Some people won’t tip no matter what. Others are seriously too poor at the moment. That’s just how it is! But you don’t know who those people are in advance. You can take educated guesses, but you never really know for sure.
Come from a place of contribution
As time goes on and we have negative driver experiences, we brace ourselves mentally for future rides, expecting the worst. What we expect is often what we see. This next piece of advice is going to sound batshit crazy (especially to seasoned drivers) but try it out for a couple days or nights and see if you notice a difference in your tips.
Have a giving mindset. Start each ride by asking yourself how you can help the pax. What can you do to make their encounter just a little bit better, without going off the deep end. It could be something simple, like pulling up a little closer to the door to pick them up, or recommending a good restaurant. Maybe helping with luggage – not because of the fender scratch factor, but because it might make their day easier. When the ride is over, remind them to check for things left behind, like their phone. Sometimes the little simple things are what people appreciate the most!
Be cautious about giving advice however. When you are “helping” people, remember that if they don’t appreciate it, it isn’t considered help. People don’t want to be told how they should run their lives, their relationships, how they should vote or worship. That advice may be helpful in your eyes, but intrusive and unwanted in theirs. Help them in ways that THEY would appreciate. Wish them a pleasant weekend. Wish them a stress free day.
When a pax takes 4 minutes to get in the car, or smells like french fry grease, and you want to turn around and punch them in the nose, instead make the effort to look at yourself in the mirror and smile. Then treat the pax as if it was no big deal. Treat them well. You can still 1* them later if you want, lol. But being courteous to people even when they piss you off can go a long ways towards better tips.
In a nutshell, be nicer to people, despite their flaws.
View attachment 314646
Good luck!
If all of the above doesn’t work, best of luck with the tip jar and cheesy sign. I look forward to hearing from those of you have noticed a money difference using some of the above suggestions.
You LEFT OUT a Key Point !

NEVER
WORK FOR A COMPANY
WHO'S SLOGAN IS
" NO NEED TO TIP " !!!
 

My3centsSuperbowl

Active Member
I agree with everything you say about servicing the customer......my problem is that when pax use a dirty horrible taxi they automatically tip.....Why not us....
Not all taxi are dirty. This just a misconception that Travis put in your head. Better chance in getting a tip delivering pizza and/or driving a cab.
 

180dayofchange

Active Member
Earning more tips as a Lyft/Uber driver without spending a penny

View attachment 314645

Drivers all want to earn more tips, without doing anything or spending much to achieve them. Everyone is looking for that “magic bullet” that is going to help them achieve greater tips. What is the secret formula? Is it giving away water or candy? What kind of candy? Putting up a sign? Putting out a tip jar of some kind? Telling people to remember to tip you? Complaining to every passenger (pax) about your pay?

View attachment 314644

Anyone who has put in any serious time in a service job knows that those are not the way to go. They may help (usually not), but the real difference between someone tipping you, or tipping more than they would normally, comes from within YOU. It's your personality that makes the difference! The person needs to feel that they appreciate the driver and/or the ride, as opposed to just having another zombie take them from point A to point B. So here are some pointers for those of you who don’t have a lot of customer service or sales experience.


Truth vs Reality

Truth: Our job is to drive people from A to B safely, and THAT'S IT.

Reality: Driving from A to B is your JOB. You are paid for your job. If you want pax to go above and beyond (give tips), then you need to go above and beyond somehow.


Make it about them

Human beings like to talk about themselves, in general. There are exceptions of course. The first thing you need to do is recognize whether someone is open to conversation or not. If they are buried in their phone or have headphones on, that is a sign to keep your mouth shut and leave them alone. If there are multiple people and they are engaged in their own conversation, try not to interrupt.

If the pax is just sitting there, try to get them talking about themselves by asking questions. Understand that there are certain topics that are off limits in society, such as relationships, politics, religion and how much money people make. Avoid those topics! Keep the conversations general, and ask questions instead of giving your opinion. Some questions to ask:
  • Do you take a lot of Uber/Lyft?
  • Have you had any crazy drivers? Ooh, tell me about it!
  • How long have you lived in this area/where are you from?
  • (for out-of-towners) What brings you into town this weekend?
  • (for students) What are you studying? Why did you choose that field?
  • Have you got any big plans for the week/weekend/holiday?
  • What do you think about all the bikes/scooters/traffic around here?
  • (for out-of-towners) What do you think are the biggest differences between your city/state and here?
  • (if going to a bar/restaurant) Have you been to this place before? What’s good there?
  • I have been thinking of getting a new phone, what kind do you have? What do you like about it?
  • I was considering taking a little time off and heading (north/south) but not sure where to go, any suggestions?
  • I just got this vehicle a few months ago, seems to be okay. How's the ride so far? Not too bumpy or noisy, is it?
Once again, avoid giving your opinion, unless it is about local restaurants and such. It is extremely tempting to chime in when someone tells you their thoughts, try to avoid “being the expert” if possible. If you give an opinion that they don’t agree with, they will simply stop talking and there goes your tip. Try to keep your opinions to yourself (until you get good at this).


Avoid complaining

View attachment 314647

This is a tough one, because a little complaining is normal, but too much makes you sound like a whiny crybaby. A simple “Traffic sucks” is acceptable, but going on and on about how you got stuck in a 45 minute parking lot that used to be called the highway is annoying to the listener. Note: when a pax complains, they don’t see it as complaining. They see it as conversation. Let them complain all they want.

The definition of ‘complaining’ is a matter of personal opinion. Suppose a pax asks you how you like driving for U/L. You answer that it’s great, but the money could be a lot better, or you wish the companies would stop trying to manipulate drivers. They ask what you mean, and this turns into an explanation on your part, and from your perspective you are simply informing the customer (after all, they asked, didn’t they?) but from their point of view you are just whining about your job. You need to find that proper balance.


Avoid negative stories and sex stories

Pax love a good story! But what is “good”? Stories that involve sex or anything with sexual physical contact should be avoided right away. They may be good stories to tell your buddies over drinks, but not to pax. Trust me on this one! TMI is bad. Pax want a story, but they don’t want to know about your private encounters with other people, passengers or otherwise.

When the pax leaves your car, you want them to leave with a positive feeling about you, about the ride, about the entire experience. If the last thing that goes into their brain is something about vomit or how you treated someone else poorly, that leaves a negative impression. You may think it's a great idea because they will feel sorry for you and tip better, but that's not how it works out in real life.

Try to tell stories where you don’t offend any particular person or group. Avoid the story where you almost got into a fight with a bicyclist, or you kicked the woman with a fake service dog out of your car. You may have been in the right, but those stories will backfire on you!


Avoid --isms


View attachment 314648

Here is a big one: avoid sentences that stereotype people. No racism, sexism, ageism, or any other form of discrimination. If your sentence starts with “I’m not racist, but….” then just don’t say it. You never know when the person you are talking to has a best friend or parent or lover who loves/is a foster child, white, Mexican, gay, Trump supporter, Muslim, Jewish, age 70+, on welfare, or whatever! Replace “one time I picked up this white guy” with “one time I picked up this guy”.

Think about how you describe people. Stop calling women “chicks”. Stop calling men “dudes”. Stop referring to people as “kids” or “old” people. Ask yourself if the age or skin color or religion of the person in the story is really relevant, or could you tell the story without it.

If you are just absolutely horrible at storytelling, then read some UP articles and use a feel-good story, after deleting the ---isms. Make sure it has a passenger-positive vibe to it!


Have a positive mindset

Ever heard the saying that “you get what you give”? This has 100% to do with your mindset and your emotional state of being. If you have a chip on your shoulder, you shouldn’t be driving people around. If you are in a great mood, it will rub off on others and that translates into better tips, believe it or not!

In between rides, DO NOT read message boards, the news, or political articles. Avoid talk radio. Why? There is a lot of negativity in all of the above, and it will mess with you mentally and emotionally. When people are thinking about negative things, they expect negative things to happen, and guess what – their view of each encounter will focus on the negative aspects! Avoid filling your mind with the negative. Just leave it out of your car until your shift is over. Trust me, the problems of the world will still be there waiting for you when you are done driving.

In between rides, turn on your favorite music and CRANK IT!! When you arrive, don’t just turn the music down, turn it off. Your song will be stuck in your head, and you will be driving along with your foot tapping, thumb tapping the wheel, and in a better mood to talk to people. Pax will pick up on your good attitude and maybe want to talk with their happy driver who is in a good mood.


Physical health

Keep yourself watered and fed. If you are overly hungry, low blood sugar makes you cranky. If you have to pee all the time, you will be impatient and not really paying attention to what the pax is saying. Too much Red Bull and you are a jabbering moron. Once again, keep yourself healthy and POSITIVE instead of NEGATIVE.


What motivates people to tip?

I want you to think about your favorite restaurants, your favorite bars, your favorite event centers, and so on. Places where you look forward to going and spending money. Got ‘em? Great. Now, is Walmart on the list? Is McDonald’s on the list? NO???? Why not, they are the cheapest prices, right? So many customers served, doesn’t everyone love Taco Bell and Dollar Store?

Ask yourself WHY you like your favorite places. What makes them special? What makes them draw you in? Is it because of the exceptionally low prices? Is it because they offer you free candy or a mint? Is it because they have a sign that says “We hope you enjoy yourself, tips are appreciated”? No, no, and no.

You enjoy your favorite places because: you feel comfortable being there. You enjoy hanging with friends because: you feel comfortable. When people are comfortable and at ease, they have no problem spending money (or being charitable in other ways). People are drawn to Uber for the low prices and convenience, but they tip for the extras that cannot be purchased at a store. If you want more tips, make your personality such that people feel comfortable and at ease in your presence.

That does not mean everyone will tip, obviously. Some people won’t tip no matter what. Others are seriously too poor at the moment. That’s just how it is! But you don’t know who those people are in advance. You can take educated guesses, but you never really know for sure.


Come from a place of contribution

As time goes on and we have negative driver experiences, we brace ourselves mentally for future rides, expecting the worst. What we expect is often what we see. This next piece of advice is going to sound batshit crazy (especially to seasoned drivers) but try it out for a couple days or nights and see if you notice a difference in your tips.

Have a giving mindset. Start each ride by asking yourself how you can help the pax. What can you do to make their encounter just a little bit better, without going off the deep end. It could be something simple, like pulling up a little closer to the door to pick them up, or recommending a good restaurant. Maybe helping with luggage – not because of the fender scratch factor, but because it might make their day easier. When the ride is over, remind them to check for things left behind, like their phone. Sometimes the little simple things are what people appreciate the most!

Be cautious about giving advice however. When you are “helping” people, remember that if they don’t appreciate it, it isn’t considered help. People don’t want to be told how they should run their lives, their relationships, how they should vote or worship. That advice may be helpful in your eyes, but intrusive and unwanted in theirs. Help them in ways that THEY would appreciate. Wish them a pleasant weekend. Wish them a stress free day.

When a pax takes 4 minutes to get in the car, or smells like french fry grease, and you want to turn around and punch them in the nose, instead make the effort to look at yourself in the mirror and smile. Then treat the pax as if it was no big deal. Treat them well. You can still 1* them later if you want, lol. But being courteous to people even when they piss you off can go a long ways towards better tips.

In a nutshell, be nicer to people, despite their flaws.

View attachment 314646


Good luck!

If all of the above doesn’t work, best of luck with the tip jar and cheesy sign. I look forward to hearing from those of you have noticed a money difference using some of the above suggestions.
and be lucky withe mood of the passengers..that's the most important :biggrin:
 

rivirobo

New Member
2.64 for a ride sucks. I do XL and have rarely got a ping for anything but a X and these folks run out the door with no cash or debit tip. Uber needs to give some XL pay or up the cost of X. I was a former limo driver for artists at Arena Theater. Houston uber needs a minimum to the driver. I spend more on tolls and gas than I get from Uber. If this sHeet doesn't pay better I will let the other
 

Attachments

Wolfgang Faust

Well-Known Member
Earning more tips as a Lyft/Uber driver without spending a penny

View attachment 314645

Drivers all want to earn more tips, without doing anything or spending much to achieve them. Everyone is looking for that “magic bullet” that is going to help them achieve greater tips. What is the secret formula? Is it giving away water or candy? What kind of candy? Putting up a sign? Putting out a tip jar of some kind? Telling people to remember to tip you? Complaining to every passenger (pax) about your pay?

View attachment 314644

Anyone who has put in any serious time in a service job knows that those are not the way to go. They may help (usually not), but the real difference between someone tipping you, or tipping more than they would normally, comes from within YOU. It's your personality that makes the difference! The person needs to feel that they appreciate the driver and/or the ride, as opposed to just having another zombie take them from point A to point B. So here are some pointers for those of you who don’t have a lot of customer service or sales experience.


Truth vs Reality

Truth: Our job is to drive people from A to B safely, and THAT'S IT.

Reality: Driving from A to B is your JOB. You are paid for your job. If you want pax to go above and beyond (give tips), then you need to go above and beyond somehow.


Make it about them

Human beings like to talk about themselves, in general. There are exceptions of course. The first thing you need to do is recognize whether someone is open to conversation or not. If they are buried in their phone or have headphones on, that is a sign to keep your mouth shut and leave them alone. If there are multiple people and they are engaged in their own conversation, try not to interrupt.

If the pax is just sitting there, try to get them talking about themselves by asking questions. Understand that there are certain topics that are off limits in society, such as relationships, politics, religion and how much money people make. Avoid those topics! Keep the conversations general, and ask questions instead of giving your opinion. Some questions to ask:
  • Do you take a lot of Uber/Lyft?
  • Have you had any crazy drivers? Ooh, tell me about it!
  • How long have you lived in this area/where are you from?
  • (for out-of-towners) What brings you into town this weekend?
  • (for students) What are you studying? Why did you choose that field?
  • Have you got any big plans for the week/weekend/holiday?
  • What do you think about all the bikes/scooters/traffic around here?
  • (for out-of-towners) What do you think are the biggest differences between your city/state and here?
  • (if going to a bar/restaurant) Have you been to this place before? What’s good there?
  • I have been thinking of getting a new phone, what kind do you have? What do you like about it?
  • I was considering taking a little time off and heading (north/south) but not sure where to go, any suggestions?
  • I just got this vehicle a few months ago, seems to be okay. How's the ride so far? Not too bumpy or noisy, is it?
Once again, avoid giving your opinion, unless it is about local restaurants and such. It is extremely tempting to chime in when someone tells you their thoughts, try to avoid “being the expert” if possible. If you give an opinion that they don’t agree with, they will simply stop talking and there goes your tip. Try to keep your opinions to yourself (until you get good at this).


Avoid complaining

View attachment 314647

This is a tough one, because a little complaining is normal, but too much makes you sound like a whiny crybaby. A simple “Traffic sucks” is acceptable, but going on and on about how you got stuck in a 45 minute parking lot that used to be called the highway is annoying to the listener. Note: when a pax complains, they don’t see it as complaining. They see it as conversation. Let them complain all they want.

The definition of ‘complaining’ is a matter of personal opinion. Suppose a pax asks you how you like driving for U/L. You answer that it’s great, but the money could be a lot better, or you wish the companies would stop trying to manipulate drivers. They ask what you mean, and this turns into an explanation on your part, and from your perspective you are simply informing the customer (after all, they asked, didn’t they?) but from their point of view you are just whining about your job. You need to find that proper balance.


Avoid negative stories and sex stories

Pax love a good story! But what is “good”? Stories that involve sex or anything with sexual physical contact should be avoided right away. They may be good stories to tell your buddies over drinks, but not to pax. Trust me on this one! TMI is bad. Pax want a story, but they don’t want to know about your private encounters with other people, passengers or otherwise.

When the pax leaves your car, you want them to leave with a positive feeling about you, about the ride, about the entire experience. If the last thing that goes into their brain is something about vomit or how you treated someone else poorly, that leaves a negative impression. You may think it's a great idea because they will feel sorry for you and tip better, but that's not how it works out in real life.

Try to tell stories where you don’t offend any particular person or group. Avoid the story where you almost got into a fight with a bicyclist, or you kicked the woman with a fake service dog out of your car. You may have been in the right, but those stories will backfire on you!


Avoid --isms


View attachment 314648

Here is a big one: avoid sentences that stereotype people. No racism, sexism, ageism, or any other form of discrimination. If your sentence starts with “I’m not racist, but….” then just don’t say it. You never know when the person you are talking to has a best friend or parent or lover who loves/is a foster child, white, Mexican, gay, Trump supporter, Muslim, Jewish, age 70+, on welfare, or whatever! Replace “one time I picked up this white guy” with “one time I picked up this guy”.

Think about how you describe people. Stop calling women “chicks”. Stop calling men “dudes”. Stop referring to people as “kids” or “old” people. Ask yourself if the age or skin color or religion of the person in the story is really relevant, or could you tell the story without it.

If you are just absolutely horrible at storytelling, then read some UP articles and use a feel-good story, after deleting the ---isms. Make sure it has a passenger-positive vibe to it!


Have a positive mindset

Ever heard the saying that “you get what you give”? This has 100% to do with your mindset and your emotional state of being. If you have a chip on your shoulder, you shouldn’t be driving people around. If you are in a great mood, it will rub off on others and that translates into better tips, believe it or not!

In between rides, DO NOT read message boards, the news, or political articles. Avoid talk radio. Why? There is a lot of negativity in all of the above, and it will mess with you mentally and emotionally. When people are thinking about negative things, they expect negative things to happen, and guess what – their view of each encounter will focus on the negative aspects! Avoid filling your mind with the negative. Just leave it out of your car until your shift is over. Trust me, the problems of the world will still be there waiting for you when you are done driving.

In between rides, turn on your favorite music and CRANK IT!! When you arrive, don’t just turn the music down, turn it off. Your song will be stuck in your head, and you will be driving along with your foot tapping, thumb tapping the wheel, and in a better mood to talk to people. Pax will pick up on your good attitude and maybe want to talk with their happy driver who is in a good mood.


Physical health

Keep yourself watered and fed. If you are overly hungry, low blood sugar makes you cranky. If you have to pee all the time, you will be impatient and not really paying attention to what the pax is saying. Too much Red Bull and you are a jabbering moron. Once again, keep yourself healthy and POSITIVE instead of NEGATIVE.


What motivates people to tip?

I want you to think about your favorite restaurants, your favorite bars, your favorite event centers, and so on. Places where you look forward to going and spending money. Got ‘em? Great. Now, is Walmart on the list? Is McDonald’s on the list? NO???? Why not, they are the cheapest prices, right? So many customers served, doesn’t everyone love Taco Bell and Dollar Store?

Ask yourself WHY you like your favorite places. What makes them special? What makes them draw you in? Is it because of the exceptionally low prices? Is it because they offer you free candy or a mint? Is it because they have a sign that says “We hope you enjoy yourself, tips are appreciated”? No, no, and no.

You enjoy your favorite places because: you feel comfortable being there. You enjoy hanging with friends because: you feel comfortable. When people are comfortable and at ease, they have no problem spending money (or being charitable in other ways). People are drawn to Uber for the low prices and convenience, but they tip for the extras that cannot be purchased at a store. If you want more tips, make your personality such that people feel comfortable and at ease in your presence.

That does not mean everyone will tip, obviously. Some people won’t tip no matter what. Others are seriously too poor at the moment. That’s just how it is! But you don’t know who those people are in advance. You can take educated guesses, but you never really know for sure.


Come from a place of contribution

As time goes on and we have negative driver experiences, we brace ourselves mentally for future rides, expecting the worst. What we expect is often what we see. This next piece of advice is going to sound batshit crazy (especially to seasoned drivers) but try it out for a couple days or nights and see if you notice a difference in your tips.

Have a giving mindset. Start each ride by asking yourself how you can help the pax. What can you do to make their encounter just a little bit better, without going off the deep end. It could be something simple, like pulling up a little closer to the door to pick them up, or recommending a good restaurant. Maybe helping with luggage – not because of the fender scratch factor, but because it might make their day easier. When the ride is over, remind them to check for things left behind, like their phone. Sometimes the little simple things are what people appreciate the most!

Be cautious about giving advice however. When you are “helping” people, remember that if they don’t appreciate it, it isn’t considered help. People don’t want to be told how they should run their lives, their relationships, how they should vote or worship. That advice may be helpful in your eyes, but intrusive and unwanted in theirs. Help them in ways that THEY would appreciate. Wish them a pleasant weekend. Wish them a stress free day.

When a pax takes 4 minutes to get in the car, or smells like french fry grease, and you want to turn around and punch them in the nose, instead make the effort to look at yourself in the mirror and smile. Then treat the pax as if it was no big deal. Treat them well. You can still 1* them later if you want, lol. But being courteous to people even when they piss you off can go a long ways towards better tips.

In a nutshell, be nicer to people, despite their flaws.

View attachment 314646


Good luck!

If all of the above doesn’t work, best of luck with the tip jar and cheesy sign. I look forward to hearing from those of you have noticed a money difference using some of the above suggestions.
tmobilep.jpg
tmobilep.jpg
 
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