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Earning more tips as a driver

Earning more tips as a Lyft/Uber driver without spending a penny

314645


Drivers all want to earn more tips, without doing anything or spending much to achieve them. Everyone is looking for that “magic bullet” that is going to help them achieve greater tips. What is the secret formula? Is it giving away water or candy? What kind of candy? Putting up a sign? Putting out a tip jar of some kind? Telling people to remember to tip you? Complaining to every passenger (pax) about your pay?

314644


Anyone who has put in any serious time in a service job knows that those are not the way to go. They may help (usually not), but the real difference between someone tipping you, or tipping more than they would normally, comes from within YOU. It's your personality that makes the difference! The person needs to feel that they appreciate the driver and/or the ride, as opposed to just having another zombie take them from point A to point B. So here are some pointers for those of you who don’t have a lot of customer service or sales experience.


Truth vs Reality

Truth: Our job is to drive people from A to B safely, and THAT'S IT.

Reality: Driving from A to B is your JOB. You are paid for your job. If you want pax to go above and beyond (give tips), then you need to go above and beyond somehow.


Make it about them

Human beings like to talk about themselves, in general. There are exceptions of course. The first thing you need to do is recognize whether someone is open to conversation or not. If they are buried in their phone or have headphones on, that is a sign to keep your mouth shut and leave them alone. If there are multiple people and they are engaged in their own conversation, try not to interrupt.

If the pax is just sitting there, try to get them talking about themselves by asking questions. Understand that there are certain topics that are off limits in society, such as relationships, politics, religion and how much money people make. Avoid those topics! Keep the conversations general, and ask questions instead of giving your opinion. Some questions to ask:
  • Do you take a lot of Uber/Lyft?
  • Have you had any crazy drivers? Ooh, tell me about it!
  • How long have you lived in this area/where are you from?
  • (for out-of-towners) What brings you into town this weekend?
  • (for students) What are you studying? Why did you choose that field?
  • Have you got any big plans for the week/weekend/holiday?
  • What do you think about all the bikes/scooters/traffic around here?
  • (for out-of-towners) What do you think are the biggest differences between your city/state and here?
  • (if going to a bar/restaurant) Have you been to this place before? What’s good there?
  • I have been thinking of getting a new phone, what kind do you have? What do you like about it?
  • I was considering taking a little time off and heading (north/south) but not sure where to go, any suggestions?
  • I just got this vehicle a few months ago, seems to be okay. How's the ride so far? Not too bumpy or noisy, is it?
Once again, avoid giving your opinion, unless it is about local restaurants and such. It is extremely tempting to chime in when someone tells you their thoughts, try to avoid “being the expert” if possible. If you give an opinion that they don’t agree with, they will simply stop talking and there goes your tip. Try to keep your opinions to yourself (until you get good at this).


Avoid complaining

314647


This is a tough one, because a little complaining is normal, but too much makes you sound like a whiny crybaby. A simple “Traffic sucks” is acceptable, but going on and on about how you got stuck in a 45 minute parking lot that used to be called the highway is annoying to the listener. Note: when a pax complains, they don’t see it as complaining. They see it as conversation. Let them complain all they want.

The definition of ‘complaining’ is a matter of personal opinion. Suppose a pax asks you how you like driving for U/L. You answer that it’s great, but the money could be a lot better, or you wish the companies would stop trying to manipulate drivers. They ask what you mean, and this turns into an explanation on your part, and from your perspective you are simply informing the customer (after all, they asked, didn’t they?) but from their point of view you are just whining about your job. You need to find that proper balance.


Avoid negative stories and sex stories

Pax love a good story! But what is “good”? Stories that involve sex or anything with sexual physical contact should be avoided right away. They may be good stories to tell your buddies over drinks, but not to pax. Trust me on this one! TMI is bad. Pax want a story, but they don’t want to know about your private encounters with other people, passengers or otherwise.

When the pax leaves your car, you want them to leave with a positive feeling about you, about the ride, about the entire experience. If the last thing that goes into their brain is something about vomit or how you treated someone else poorly, that leaves a negative impression. You may think it's a great idea because they will feel sorry for you and tip better, but that's not how it works out in real life.

Try to tell stories where you don’t offend any particular person or group. Avoid the story where you almost got into a fight with a bicyclist, or you kicked the woman with a fake service dog out of your car. You may have been in the right, but those stories will backfire on you!


Avoid --isms


314648


Here is a big one: avoid sentences that stereotype people. No racism, sexism, ageism, or any other form of discrimination. If your sentence starts with “I’m not racist, but….” then just don’t say it. You never know when the person you are talking to has a best friend or parent or lover who loves/is a foster child, white, Mexican, gay, Trump supporter, Muslim, Jewish, age 70+, on welfare, or whatever! Replace “one time I picked up this white guy” with “one time I picked up this guy”.

Think about how you describe people. Stop calling women “chicks”. Stop calling men “dudes”. Stop referring to people as “kids” or “old” people. Ask yourself if the age or skin color or religion of the person in the story is really relevant, or could you tell the story without it.

If you are just absolutely horrible at storytelling, then read some UP articles and use a feel-good story, after deleting the ---isms. Make sure it has a passenger-positive vibe to it!


Have a positive mindset

Ever heard the saying that “you get what you give”? This has 100% to do with your mindset and your emotional state of being. If you have a chip on your shoulder, you shouldn’t be driving people around. If you are in a great mood, it will rub off on others and that translates into better tips, believe it or not!

In between rides, DO NOT read message boards, the news, or political articles. Avoid talk radio. Why? There is a lot of negativity in all of the above, and it will mess with you mentally and emotionally. When people are thinking about negative things, they expect negative things to happen, and guess what – their view of each encounter will focus on the negative aspects! Avoid filling your mind with the negative. Just leave it out of your car until your shift is over. Trust me, the problems of the world will still be there waiting for you when you are done driving.

In between rides, turn on your favorite music and CRANK IT!! When you arrive, don’t just turn the music down, turn it off. Your song will be stuck in your head, and you will be driving along with your foot tapping, thumb tapping the wheel, and in a better mood to talk to people. Pax will pick up on your good attitude and maybe want to talk with their happy driver who is in a good mood.


Physical health

Keep yourself watered and fed. If you are overly hungry, low blood sugar makes you cranky. If you have to pee all the time, you will be impatient and not really paying attention to what the pax is saying. Too much Red Bull and you are a jabbering moron. Once again, keep yourself healthy and POSITIVE instead of NEGATIVE.


What motivates people to tip?

I want you to think about your favorite restaurants, your favorite bars, your favorite event centers, and so on. Places where you look forward to going and spending money. Got ‘em? Great. Now, is Walmart on the list? Is McDonald’s on the list? NO???? Why not, they are the cheapest prices, right? So many customers served, doesn’t everyone love Taco Bell and Dollar Store?

Ask yourself WHY you like your favorite places. What makes them special? What makes them draw you in? Is it because of the exceptionally low prices? Is it because they offer you free candy or a mint? Is it because they have a sign that says “We hope you enjoy yourself, tips are appreciated”? No, no, and no.

You enjoy your favorite places because: you feel comfortable being there. You enjoy hanging with friends because: you feel comfortable. When people are comfortable and at ease, they have no problem spending money (or being charitable in other ways). People are drawn to Uber for the low prices and convenience, but they tip for the extras that cannot be purchased at a store. If you want more tips, make your personality such that people feel comfortable and at ease in your presence.

That does not mean everyone will tip, obviously. Some people won’t tip no matter what. Others are seriously too poor at the moment. That’s just how it is! But you don’t know who those people are in advance. You can take educated guesses, but you never really know for sure.


Come from a place of contribution

As time goes on and we have negative driver experiences, we brace ourselves mentally for future rides, expecting the worst. What we expect is often what we see. This next piece of advice is going to sound batshit crazy (especially to seasoned drivers) but try it out for a couple days or nights and see if you notice a difference in your tips.

Have a giving mindset. Start each ride by asking yourself how you can help the pax. What can you do to make their encounter just a little bit better, without going off the deep end. It could be something simple, like pulling up a little closer to the door to pick them up, or recommending a good restaurant. Maybe helping with luggage – not because of the fender scratch factor, but because it might make their day easier. When the ride is over, remind them to check for things left behind, like their phone. Sometimes the little simple things are what people appreciate the most!

Be cautious about giving advice however. When you are “helping” people, remember that if they don’t appreciate it, it isn’t considered help. People don’t want to be told how they should run their lives, their relationships, how they should vote or worship. That advice may be helpful in your eyes, but intrusive and unwanted in theirs. Help them in ways that THEY would appreciate. Wish them a pleasant weekend. Wish them a stress free day.

When a pax takes 4 minutes to get in the car, or smells like french fry grease, and you want to turn around and punch them in the nose, instead make the effort to look at yourself in the mirror and smile. Then treat the pax as if it was no big deal. Treat them well. You can still 1* them later if you want, lol. But being courteous to people even when they piss you off can go a long ways towards better tips.

In a nutshell, be nicer to people, despite their flaws.

314646



Good luck!

If all of the above doesn’t work, best of luck with the tip jar and cheesy sign. I look forward to hearing from those of you have noticed a money difference using some of the above suggestions.
 
Mr T

Disgusted Driver

Well-Known Member
Well put, well written and should be heeded.

I see two negative comments here from people who clearly missed the point and don't get it. You do 100's of rides. No one can predict what happens on a single ride. Yes you will get stiffed even after someone claims they will tip you. This is about playing the odds. If you do X then y people will tip You can't guarantee a tip on a single given ride unless ou use a gun. What you can do is make it more likely that people will tip you. My tip % of fares runs right about 10%, some weeks lower, some higher. I know that I am more likely to get tips when I am happy, upbeat and outgoing, I have the data to prove it. Some days I simply don't care. I'm grumpy or moody and just drive in silence and I might only see 6 or 8%. When I am on and charged the number of people who tips only go up slightly as a percentage but the size of the tip goes up, I'm much more likely to get the $5's instead of the 1, 2 or 3's. Every bit of advice in there is spot on, it will increase the number of tips you get and the size of the tip as well if practiced correctly. It's just like sales. A good salesman over time will close more deals and make more money per deal than a more mediocre salesman. They may not be able to tell for certain which person will or won't but over time they will get more yeses!
 

25rides7daysaweek

Well-Known Member
Earning more tips as a Lyft/Uber driver without spending a penny

View attachment 314645

Drivers all want to earn more tips, without doing anything or spending much to achieve them. Everyone is looking for that “magic bullet” that is going to help them achieve greater tips. What is the secret formula? Is it giving away water or candy? What kind of candy? Putting up a sign? Putting out a tip jar of some kind? Telling people to remember to tip you? Complaining to every passenger (pax) about your pay?

View attachment 314644

Anyone who has put in any serious time in a service job knows that those are not the way to go. They may help (usually not), but the real difference between someone tipping you, or tipping more than they would normally, comes from within YOU. It's your personality that makes the difference! The person needs to feel that they appreciate the driver and/or the ride, as opposed to just having another zombie take them from point A to point B. So here are some pointers for those of you who don’t have a lot of customer service or sales experience.


Truth vs Reality

Truth: Our job is to drive people from A to B safely, and THAT'S IT.

Reality: Driving from A to B is your JOB. You are paid for your job. If you want pax to go above and beyond (give tips), then you need to go above and beyond somehow.


Make it about them

Human beings like to talk about themselves, in general. There are exceptions of course. The first thing you need to do is recognize whether someone is open to conversation or not. If they are buried in their phone or have headphones on, that is a sign to keep your mouth shut and leave them alone. If there are multiple people and they are engaged in their own conversation, try not to interrupt.

If the pax is just sitting there, try to get them talking about themselves by asking questions. Understand that there are certain topics that are off limits in society, such as relationships, politics, religion and how much money people make. Avoid those topics! Keep the conversations general, and ask questions instead of giving your opinion. Some questions to ask:
  • Do you take a lot of Uber/Lyft?
  • Have you had any crazy drivers? Ooh, tell me about it!
  • How long have you lived in this area/where are you from?
  • (for out-of-towners) What brings you into town this weekend?
  • (for students) What are you studying? Why did you choose that field?
  • Have you got any big plans for the week/weekend/holiday?
  • What do you think about all the bikes/scooters/traffic around here?
  • (for out-of-towners) What do you think are the biggest differences between your city/state and here?
  • (if going to a bar/restaurant) Have you been to this place before? What’s good there?
  • I have been thinking of getting a new phone, what kind do you have? What do you like about it?
  • I was considering taking a little time off and heading (north/south) but not sure where to go, any suggestions?
  • I just got this vehicle a few months ago, seems to be okay. How's the ride so far? Not too bumpy or noisy, is it?
Once again, avoid giving your opinion, unless it is about local restaurants and such. It is extremely tempting to chime in when someone tells you their thoughts, try to avoid “being the expert” if possible. If you give an opinion that they don’t agree with, they will simply stop talking and there goes your tip. Try to keep your opinions to yourself (until you get good at this).


Avoid complaining

View attachment 314647

This is a tough one, because a little complaining is normal, but too much makes you sound like a whiny crybaby. A simple “Traffic sucks” is acceptable, but going on and on about how you got stuck in a 45 minute parking lot that used to be called the highway is annoying to the listener. Note: when a pax complains, they don’t see it as complaining. They see it as conversation. Let them complain all they want.

The definition of ‘complaining’ is a matter of personal opinion. Suppose a pax asks you how you like driving for U/L. You answer that it’s great, but the money could be a lot better, or you wish the companies would stop trying to manipulate drivers. They ask what you mean, and this turns into an explanation on your part, and from your perspective you are simply informing the customer (after all, they asked, didn’t they?) but from their point of view you are just whining about your job. You need to find that proper balance.


Avoid negative stories and sex stories

Pax love a good story! But what is “good”? Stories that involve sex or anything with sexual physical contact should be avoided right away. They may be good stories to tell your buddies over drinks, but not to pax. Trust me on this one! TMI is bad. Pax want a story, but they don’t want to know about your private encounters with other people, passengers or otherwise.

When the pax leaves your car, you want them to leave with a positive feeling about you, about the ride, about the entire experience. If the last thing that goes into their brain is something about vomit or how you treated someone else poorly, that leaves a negative impression. You may think it's a great idea because they will feel sorry for you and tip better, but that's not how it works out in real life.

Try to tell stories where you don’t offend any particular person or group. Avoid the story where you almost got into a fight with a bicyclist, or you kicked the woman with a fake service dog out of your car. You may have been in the right, but those stories will backfire on you!


Avoid --isms


View attachment 314648

Here is a big one: avoid sentences that stereotype people. No racism, sexism, ageism, or any other form of discrimination. If your sentence starts with “I’m not racist, but….” then just don’t say it. You never know when the person you are talking to has a best friend or parent or lover who loves/is a foster child, white, Mexican, gay, Trump supporter, Muslim, Jewish, age 70+, on welfare, or whatever! Replace “one time I picked up this white guy” with “one time I picked up this guy”.

Think about how you describe people. Stop calling women “chicks”. Stop calling men “dudes”. Stop referring to people as “kids” or “old” people. Ask yourself if the age or skin color or religion of the person in the story is really relevant, or could you tell the story without it.

If you are just absolutely horrible at storytelling, then read some UP articles and use a feel-good story, after deleting the ---isms. Make sure it has a passenger-positive vibe to it!


Have a positive mindset

Ever heard the saying that “you get what you give”? This has 100% to do with your mindset and your emotional state of being. If you have a chip on your shoulder, you shouldn’t be driving people around. If you are in a great mood, it will rub off on others and that translates into better tips, believe it or not!

In between rides, DO NOT read message boards, the news, or political articles. Avoid talk radio. Why? There is a lot of negativity in all of the above, and it will mess with you mentally and emotionally. When people are thinking about negative things, they expect negative things to happen, and guess what – their view of each encounter will focus on the negative aspects! Avoid filling your mind with the negative. Just leave it out of your car until your shift is over. Trust me, the problems of the world will still be there waiting for you when you are done driving.

In between rides, turn on your favorite music and CRANK IT!! When you arrive, don’t just turn the music down, turn it off. Your song will be stuck in your head, and you will be driving along with your foot tapping, thumb tapping the wheel, and in a better mood to talk to people. Pax will pick up on your good attitude and maybe want to talk with their happy driver who is in a good mood.


Physical health

Keep yourself watered and fed. If you are overly hungry, low blood sugar makes you cranky. If you have to pee all the time, you will be impatient and not really paying attention to what the pax is saying. Too much Red Bull and you are a jabbering moron. Once again, keep yourself healthy and POSITIVE instead of NEGATIVE.


What motivates people to tip?

I want you to think about your favorite restaurants, your favorite bars, your favorite event centers, and so on. Places where you look forward to going and spending money. Got ‘em? Great. Now, is Walmart on the list? Is McDonald’s on the list? NO???? Why not, they are the cheapest prices, right? So many customers served, doesn’t everyone love Taco Bell and Dollar Store?

Ask yourself WHY you like your favorite places. What makes them special? What makes them draw you in? Is it because of the exceptionally low prices? Is it because they offer you free candy or a mint? Is it because they have a sign that says “We hope you enjoy yourself, tips are appreciated”? No, no, and no.

You enjoy your favorite places because: you feel comfortable being there. You enjoy hanging with friends because: you feel comfortable. When people are comfortable and at ease, they have no problem spending money (or being charitable in other ways). People are drawn to Uber for the low prices and convenience, but they tip for the extras that cannot be purchased at a store. If you want more tips, make your personality such that people feel comfortable and at ease in your presence.

That does not mean everyone will tip, obviously. Some people won’t tip no matter what. Others are seriously too poor at the moment. That’s just how it is! But you don’t know who those people are in advance. You can take educated guesses, but you never really know for sure.


Come from a place of contribution

As time goes on and we have negative driver experiences, we brace ourselves mentally for future rides, expecting the worst. What we expect is often what we see. This next piece of advice is going to sound batshit crazy (especially to seasoned drivers) but try it out for a couple days or nights and see if you notice a difference in your tips.

Have a giving mindset. Start each ride by asking yourself how you can help the pax. What can you do to make their encounter just a little bit better, without going off the deep end. It could be something simple, like pulling up a little closer to the door to pick them up, or recommending a good restaurant. Maybe helping with luggage – not because of the fender scratch factor, but because it might make their day easier. When the ride is over, remind them to check for things left behind, like their phone. Sometimes the little simple things are what people appreciate the most!

Be cautious about giving advice however. When you are “helping” people, remember that if they don’t appreciate it, it isn’t considered help. People don’t want to be told how they should run their lives, their relationships, how they should vote or worship. That advice may be helpful in your eyes, but intrusive and unwanted in theirs. Help them in ways that THEY would appreciate. Wish them a pleasant weekend. Wish them a stress free day.

When a pax takes 4 minutes to get in the car, or smells like french fry grease, and you want to turn around and punch them in the nose, instead make the effort to look at yourself in the mirror and smile. Then treat the pax as if it was no big deal. Treat them well. You can still 1* them later if you want, lol. But being courteous to people even when they piss you off can go a long ways towards better tips.

In a nutshell, be nicer to people, despite their flaws.

View attachment 314646


Good luck!

If all of the above doesn’t work, best of luck with the tip jar and cheesy sign. I look forward to hearing from those of you have noticed a money difference using some of the above suggestions.
If you want tips deliver pizzas....
 

amp man

Active Member
Earning more tips as a Lyft/Uber driver without spending a penny

View attachment 314645

Drivers all want to earn more tips, without doing anything or spending much to achieve them. Everyone is looking for that “magic bullet” that is going to help them achieve greater tips. What is the secret formula? Is it giving away water or candy? What kind of candy? Putting up a sign? Putting out a tip jar of some kind? Telling people to remember to tip you? Complaining to every passenger (pax) about your pay?

View attachment 314644

Anyone who has put in any serious time in a service job knows that those are not the way to go. They may help (usually not), but the real difference between someone tipping you, or tipping more than they would normally, comes from within YOU. It's your personality that makes the difference! The person needs to feel that they appreciate the driver and/or the ride, as opposed to just having another zombie take them from point A to point B. So here are some pointers for those of you who don’t have a lot of customer service or sales experience.


Truth vs Reality

Truth: Our job is to drive people from A to B safely, and THAT'S IT.

Reality: Driving from A to B is your JOB. You are paid for your job. If you want pax to go above and beyond (give tips), then you need to go above and beyond somehow.


Make it about them

Human beings like to talk about themselves, in general. There are exceptions of course. The first thing you need to do is recognize whether someone is open to conversation or not. If they are buried in their phone or have headphones on, that is a sign to keep your mouth shut and leave them alone. If there are multiple people and they are engaged in their own conversation, try not to interrupt.

If the pax is just sitting there, try to get them talking about themselves by asking questions. Understand that there are certain topics that are off limits in society, such as relationships, politics, religion and how much money people make. Avoid those topics! Keep the conversations general, and ask questions instead of giving your opinion. Some questions to ask:
  • Do you take a lot of Uber/Lyft?
  • Have you had any crazy drivers? Ooh, tell me about it!
  • How long have you lived in this area/where are you from?
  • (for out-of-towners) What brings you into town this weekend?
  • (for students) What are you studying? Why did you choose that field?
  • Have you got any big plans for the week/weekend/holiday?
  • What do you think about all the bikes/scooters/traffic around here?
  • (for out-of-towners) What do you think are the biggest differences between your city/state and here?
  • (if going to a bar/restaurant) Have you been to this place before? What’s good there?
  • I have been thinking of getting a new phone, what kind do you have? What do you like about it?
  • I was considering taking a little time off and heading (north/south) but not sure where to go, any suggestions?
  • I just got this vehicle a few months ago, seems to be okay. How's the ride so far? Not too bumpy or noisy, is it?
Once again, avoid giving your opinion, unless it is about local restaurants and such. It is extremely tempting to chime in when someone tells you their thoughts, try to avoid “being the expert” if possible. If you give an opinion that they don’t agree with, they will simply stop talking and there goes your tip. Try to keep your opinions to yourself (until you get good at this).


Avoid complaining

View attachment 314647

This is a tough one, because a little complaining is normal, but too much makes you sound like a whiny crybaby. A simple “Traffic sucks” is acceptable, but going on and on about how you got stuck in a 45 minute parking lot that used to be called the highway is annoying to the listener. Note: when a pax complains, they don’t see it as complaining. They see it as conversation. Let them complain all they want.

The definition of ‘complaining’ is a matter of personal opinion. Suppose a pax asks you how you like driving for U/L. You answer that it’s great, but the money could be a lot better, or you wish the companies would stop trying to manipulate drivers. They ask what you mean, and this turns into an explanation on your part, and from your perspective you are simply informing the customer (after all, they asked, didn’t they?) but from their point of view you are just whining about your job. You need to find that proper balance.


Avoid negative stories and sex stories

Pax love a good story! But what is “good”? Stories that involve sex or anything with sexual physical contact should be avoided right away. They may be good stories to tell your buddies over drinks, but not to pax. Trust me on this one! TMI is bad. Pax want a story, but they don’t want to know about your private encounters with other people, passengers or otherwise.

When the pax leaves your car, you want them to leave with a positive feeling about you, about the ride, about the entire experience. If the last thing that goes into their brain is something about vomit or how you treated someone else poorly, that leaves a negative impression. You may think it's a great idea because they will feel sorry for you and tip better, but that's not how it works out in real life.

Try to tell stories where you don’t offend any particular person or group. Avoid the story where you almost got into a fight with a bicyclist, or you kicked the woman with a fake service dog out of your car. You may have been in the right, but those stories will backfire on you!


Avoid --isms


View attachment 314648

Here is a big one: avoid sentences that stereotype people. No racism, sexism, ageism, or any other form of discrimination. If your sentence starts with “I’m not racist, but….” then just don’t say it. You never know when the person you are talking to has a best friend or parent or lover who loves/is a foster child, white, Mexican, gay, Trump supporter, Muslim, Jewish, age 70+, on welfare, or whatever! Replace “one time I picked up this white guy” with “one time I picked up this guy”.

Think about how you describe people. Stop calling women “chicks”. Stop calling men “dudes”. Stop referring to people as “kids” or “old” people. Ask yourself if the age or skin color or religion of the person in the story is really relevant, or could you tell the story without it.

If you are just absolutely horrible at storytelling, then read some UP articles and use a feel-good story, after deleting the ---isms. Make sure it has a passenger-positive vibe to it!


Have a positive mindset

Ever heard the saying that “you get what you give”? This has 100% to do with your mindset and your emotional state of being. If you have a chip on your shoulder, you shouldn’t be driving people around. If you are in a great mood, it will rub off on others and that translates into better tips, believe it or not!

In between rides, DO NOT read message boards, the news, or political articles. Avoid talk radio. Why? There is a lot of negativity in all of the above, and it will mess with you mentally and emotionally. When people are thinking about negative things, they expect negative things to happen, and guess what – their view of each encounter will focus on the negative aspects! Avoid filling your mind with the negative. Just leave it out of your car until your shift is over. Trust me, the problems of the world will still be there waiting for you when you are done driving.

In between rides, turn on your favorite music and CRANK IT!! When you arrive, don’t just turn the music down, turn it off. Your song will be stuck in your head, and you will be driving along with your foot tapping, thumb tapping the wheel, and in a better mood to talk to people. Pax will pick up on your good attitude and maybe want to talk with their happy driver who is in a good mood.


Physical health

Keep yourself watered and fed. If you are overly hungry, low blood sugar makes you cranky. If you have to pee all the time, you will be impatient and not really paying attention to what the pax is saying. Too much Red Bull and you are a jabbering moron. Once again, keep yourself healthy and POSITIVE instead of NEGATIVE.


What motivates people to tip?

I want you to think about your favorite restaurants, your favorite bars, your favorite event centers, and so on. Places where you look forward to going and spending money. Got ‘em? Great. Now, is Walmart on the list? Is McDonald’s on the list? NO???? Why not, they are the cheapest prices, right? So many customers served, doesn’t everyone love Taco Bell and Dollar Store?

Ask yourself WHY you like your favorite places. What makes them special? What makes them draw you in? Is it because of the exceptionally low prices? Is it because they offer you free candy or a mint? Is it because they have a sign that says “We hope you enjoy yourself, tips are appreciated”? No, no, and no.

You enjoy your favorite places because: you feel comfortable being there. You enjoy hanging with friends because: you feel comfortable. When people are comfortable and at ease, they have no problem spending money (or being charitable in other ways). People are drawn to Uber for the low prices and convenience, but they tip for the extras that cannot be purchased at a store. If you want more tips, make your personality such that people feel comfortable and at ease in your presence.

That does not mean everyone will tip, obviously. Some people won’t tip no matter what. Others are seriously too poor at the moment. That’s just how it is! But you don’t know who those people are in advance. You can take educated guesses, but you never really know for sure.


Come from a place of contribution

As time goes on and we have negative driver experiences, we brace ourselves mentally for future rides, expecting the worst. What we expect is often what we see. This next piece of advice is going to sound batshit crazy (especially to seasoned drivers) but try it out for a couple days or nights and see if you notice a difference in your tips.

Have a giving mindset. Start each ride by asking yourself how you can help the pax. What can you do to make their encounter just a little bit better, without going off the deep end. It could be something simple, like pulling up a little closer to the door to pick them up, or recommending a good restaurant. Maybe helping with luggage – not because of the fender scratch factor, but because it might make their day easier. When the ride is over, remind them to check for things left behind, like their phone. Sometimes the little simple things are what people appreciate the most!

Be cautious about giving advice however. When you are “helping” people, remember that if they don’t appreciate it, it isn’t considered help. People don’t want to be told how they should run their lives, their relationships, how they should vote or worship. That advice may be helpful in your eyes, but intrusive and unwanted in theirs. Help them in ways that THEY would appreciate. Wish them a pleasant weekend. Wish them a stress free day.

When a pax takes 4 minutes to get in the car, or smells like french fry grease, and you want to turn around and punch them in the nose, instead make the effort to look at yourself in the mirror and smile. Then treat the pax as if it was no big deal. Treat them well. You can still 1* them later if you want, lol. But being courteous to people even when they piss you off can go a long ways towards better tips.

In a nutshell, be nicer to people, despite their flaws.

View attachment 314646


Good luck!

If all of the above doesn’t work, best of luck with the tip jar and cheesy sign. I look forward to hearing from those of you have noticed a money difference using some of the above suggestions.
Nicely done. Thanks!
 

Crosbyandstarsky

Active Member
Earning more tips as a Lyft/Uber driver without spending a penny

View attachment 314645

Drivers all want to earn more tips, without doing anything or spending much to achieve them. Everyone is looking for that “magic bullet” that is going to help them achieve greater tips. What is the secret formula? Is it giving away water or candy? What kind of candy? Putting up a sign? Putting out a tip jar of some kind? Telling people to remember to tip you? Complaining to every passenger (pax) about your pay?

View attachment 314644

Anyone who has put in any serious time in a service job knows that those are not the way to go. They may help (usually not), but the real difference between someone tipping you, or tipping more than they would normally, comes from within YOU. It's your personality that makes the difference! The person needs to feel that they appreciate the driver and/or the ride, as opposed to just having another zombie take them from point A to point B. So here are some pointers for those of you who don’t have a lot of customer service or sales experience.


Truth vs Reality

Truth: Our job is to drive people from A to B safely, and THAT'S IT.

Reality: Driving from A to B is your JOB. You are paid for your job. If you want pax to go above and beyond (give tips), then you need to go above and beyond somehow.


Make it about them

Human beings like to talk about themselves, in general. There are exceptions of course. The first thing you need to do is recognize whether someone is open to conversation or not. If they are buried in their phone or have headphones on, that is a sign to keep your mouth shut and leave them alone. If there are multiple people and they are engaged in their own conversation, try not to interrupt.

If the pax is just sitting there, try to get them talking about themselves by asking questions. Understand that there are certain topics that are off limits in society, such as relationships, politics, religion and how much money people make. Avoid those topics! Keep the conversations general, and ask questions instead of giving your opinion. Some questions to ask:
  • Do you take a lot of Uber/Lyft?
  • Have you had any crazy drivers? Ooh, tell me about it!
  • How long have you lived in this area/where are you from?
  • (for out-of-towners) What brings you into town this weekend?
  • (for students) What are you studying? Why did you choose that field?
  • Have you got any big plans for the week/weekend/holiday?
  • What do you think about all the bikes/scooters/traffic around here?
  • (for out-of-towners) What do you think are the biggest differences between your city/state and here?
  • (if going to a bar/restaurant) Have you been to this place before? What’s good there?
  • I have been thinking of getting a new phone, what kind do you have? What do you like about it?
  • I was considering taking a little time off and heading (north/south) but not sure where to go, any suggestions?
  • I just got this vehicle a few months ago, seems to be okay. How's the ride so far? Not too bumpy or noisy, is it?
Once again, avoid giving your opinion, unless it is about local restaurants and such. It is extremely tempting to chime in when someone tells you their thoughts, try to avoid “being the expert” if possible. If you give an opinion that they don’t agree with, they will simply stop talking and there goes your tip. Try to keep your opinions to yourself (until you get good at this).


Avoid complaining

View attachment 314647

This is a tough one, because a little complaining is normal, but too much makes you sound like a whiny crybaby. A simple “Traffic sucks” is acceptable, but going on and on about how you got stuck in a 45 minute parking lot that used to be called the highway is annoying to the listener. Note: when a pax complains, they don’t see it as complaining. They see it as conversation. Let them complain all they want.

The definition of ‘complaining’ is a matter of personal opinion. Suppose a pax asks you how you like driving for U/L. You answer that it’s great, but the money could be a lot better, or you wish the companies would stop trying to manipulate drivers. They ask what you mean, and this turns into an explanation on your part, and from your perspective you are simply informing the customer (after all, they asked, didn’t they?) but from their point of view you are just whining about your job. You need to find that proper balance.


Avoid negative stories and sex stories

Pax love a good story! But what is “good”? Stories that involve sex or anything with sexual physical contact should be avoided right away. They may be good stories to tell your buddies over drinks, but not to pax. Trust me on this one! TMI is bad. Pax want a story, but they don’t want to know about your private encounters with other people, passengers or otherwise.

When the pax leaves your car, you want them to leave with a positive feeling about you, about the ride, about the entire experience. If the last thing that goes into their brain is something about vomit or how you treated someone else poorly, that leaves a negative impression. You may think it's a great idea because they will feel sorry for you and tip better, but that's not how it works out in real life.

Try to tell stories where you don’t offend any particular person or group. Avoid the story where you almost got into a fight with a bicyclist, or you kicked the woman with a fake service dog out of your car. You may have been in the right, but those stories will backfire on you!


Avoid --isms


View attachment 314648

Here is a big one: avoid sentences that stereotype people. No racism, sexism, ageism, or any other form of discrimination. If your sentence starts with “I’m not racist, but….” then just don’t say it. You never know when the person you are talking to has a best friend or parent or lover who loves/is a foster child, white, Mexican, gay, Trump supporter, Muslim, Jewish, age 70+, on welfare, or whatever! Replace “one time I picked up this white guy” with “one time I picked up this guy”.

Think about how you describe people. Stop calling women “chicks”. Stop calling men “dudes”. Stop referring to people as “kids” or “old” people. Ask yourself if the age or skin color or religion of the person in the story is really relevant, or could you tell the story without it.

If you are just absolutely horrible at storytelling, then read some UP articles and use a feel-good story, after deleting the ---isms. Make sure it has a passenger-positive vibe to it!


Have a positive mindset

Ever heard the saying that “you get what you give”? This has 100% to do with your mindset and your emotional state of being. If you have a chip on your shoulder, you shouldn’t be driving people around. If you are in a great mood, it will rub off on others and that translates into better tips, believe it or not!

In between rides, DO NOT read message boards, the news, or political articles. Avoid talk radio. Why? There is a lot of negativity in all of the above, and it will mess with you mentally and emotionally. When people are thinking about negative things, they expect negative things to happen, and guess what – their view of each encounter will focus on the negative aspects! Avoid filling your mind with the negative. Just leave it out of your car until your shift is over. Trust me, the problems of the world will still be there waiting for you when you are done driving.

In between rides, turn on your favorite music and CRANK IT!! When you arrive, don’t just turn the music down, turn it off. Your song will be stuck in your head, and you will be driving along with your foot tapping, thumb tapping the wheel, and in a better mood to talk to people. Pax will pick up on your good attitude and maybe want to talk with their happy driver who is in a good mood.


Physical health

Keep yourself watered and fed. If you are overly hungry, low blood sugar makes you cranky. If you have to pee all the time, you will be impatient and not really paying attention to what the pax is saying. Too much Red Bull and you are a jabbering moron. Once again, keep yourself healthy and POSITIVE instead of NEGATIVE.


What motivates people to tip?

I want you to think about your favorite restaurants, your favorite bars, your favorite event centers, and so on. Places where you look forward to going and spending money. Got ‘em? Great. Now, is Walmart on the list? Is McDonald’s on the list? NO???? Why not, they are the cheapest prices, right? So many customers served, doesn’t everyone love Taco Bell and Dollar Store?

Ask yourself WHY you like your favorite places. What makes them special? What makes them draw you in? Is it because of the exceptionally low prices? Is it because they offer you free candy or a mint? Is it because they have a sign that says “We hope you enjoy yourself, tips are appreciated”? No, no, and no.

You enjoy your favorite places because: you feel comfortable being there. You enjoy hanging with friends because: you feel comfortable. When people are comfortable and at ease, they have no problem spending money (or being charitable in other ways). People are drawn to Uber for the low prices and convenience, but they tip for the extras that cannot be purchased at a store. If you want more tips, make your personality such that people feel comfortable and at ease in your presence.

That does not mean everyone will tip, obviously. Some people won’t tip no matter what. Others are seriously too poor at the moment. That’s just how it is! But you don’t know who those people are in advance. You can take educated guesses, but you never really know for sure.


Come from a place of contribution

As time goes on and we have negative driver experiences, we brace ourselves mentally for future rides, expecting the worst. What we expect is often what we see. This next piece of advice is going to sound batshit crazy (especially to seasoned drivers) but try it out for a couple days or nights and see if you notice a difference in your tips.

Have a giving mindset. Start each ride by asking yourself how you can help the pax. What can you do to make their encounter just a little bit better, without going off the deep end. It could be something simple, like pulling up a little closer to the door to pick them up, or recommending a good restaurant. Maybe helping with luggage – not because of the fender scratch factor, but because it might make their day easier. When the ride is over, remind them to check for things left behind, like their phone. Sometimes the little simple things are what people appreciate the most!

Be cautious about giving advice however. When you are “helping” people, remember that if they don’t appreciate it, it isn’t considered help. People don’t want to be told how they should run their lives, their relationships, how they should vote or worship. That advice may be helpful in your eyes, but intrusive and unwanted in theirs. Help them in ways that THEY would appreciate. Wish them a pleasant weekend. Wish them a stress free day.

When a pax takes 4 minutes to get in the car, or smells like french fry grease, and you want to turn around and punch them in the nose, instead make the effort to look at yourself in the mirror and smile. Then treat the pax as if it was no big deal. Treat them well. You can still 1* them later if you want, lol. But being courteous to people even when they piss you off can go a long ways towards better tips.

In a nutshell, be nicer to people, despite their flaws.

View attachment 314646


Good luck!

If all of the above doesn’t work, best of luck with the tip jar and cheesy sign. I look forward to hearing from those of you have noticed a money difference using some of the above suggestions.
Same as waitress and other tipping professions . I don’t tip them anymore. I go way above and beyond and people just don’t tip very much
 

SouthFLuberlady

Active Member
I don’t give out water or candy or ask anyone to tip... I do pretty good on tips.. sometimes more than the rides. I simply pull up put my window down ask them for their name.. they get in ask them if they are ready to go.. start driving and ask them how they are today.. if they wanna talk they will talk if not I’m quite and drop them off to get to my next passenger.

I love the article well written and lots of good points.
 

Ylinks

Member
The tippers are going to tip and the stiffers are going to stiff. It's very likely that the outcome of you being tipped is predetermined before the ride even begins.
Absolutely correct! If you pick up a stiffer you can throw you coat in a puddle to keep their feet dry and they aren't going to tip. If you have a tipper you are going to have to piss them off pretty badly not to get a tip. The only way to increase you tips is to match the pickup location with the rider rating on the trip request. If you have a 4.72 rider and a pickup at Walmart you decline the trip. If you have a 4.96 rider with a pick up at the BMW agency you take the trip.
 
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