Due to brash behavior, Uber is caving in to regulations

BurgerTiime

Well-Known Member
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-41604498

Uber has backed down from its threat to leave the Canadian province of Quebec over new rules it felt were too restrictive.

The ride-sharing company, based in San Francisco, was due to halt its operations in the province on Saturday.

Uber Quebec says it sees a chance to start a "constructive dialogue" with the province's new transport minister.

The company was concerned about regulations that will require drivers to undergo police background checks.

Uber drivers will also need to complete 35 hours of training, before being allowed to pick up passengers.

Those rules came out in September, almost a year after the provincial government agreed to let Uber operate in Quebec on a trial basis.

New provincial transport minister Andre Fortin said on Friday that current Uber drivers will now have up to two years to get police background checks, as opposed to going through a criminal check with a private company.

Drivers who sign on after 15 October will need to complete the check within eight weeks.

All Uber drivers will still need to complete the extended training course, placing them on par with taxi drivers in Quebec.

Mr Fortin said in a statement that "this simple change does not change Uber's obligations" and that it was an issue of "fairness for all market partners and for user safety".

Uber has 50 office staff and about 10,000 drivers across Quebec, which includes Canada's second largest city, Montreal.


Media captionTwo Uber drivers take opposing views on how the company should treat them
The global company on Friday also filed an appeal against a decision by London authorities to deny it a licence to operate in the city.

London transport authorities refused Uber a new private hire licence, saying the ride-hailing firm was not fit and proper on the grounds of "public safety and security implications".

Uber has been roiled by a string of controversies in recent months.

In July, chief executive Travis Kalanick, who helped found the company in 2009, resigned following a series of scandals and criticism of his management style.

In June, 20 staff were sacked in the US after a law firm investigated complaints made to the company about sexual harassment, bullying and retaliation for reporting problems.

Last year, Uber lost a landmark employment tribunal in the UK which ruled drivers should be classed as workers rather than being self-employed.
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-41604498

Uber has backed down from its threat to leave the Canadian province of Quebec over new rules it felt were too restrictive.

The ride-sharing company, based in San Francisco, was due to halt its operations in the province on Saturday.

Uber Quebec says it sees a chance to start a "constructive dialogue" with the province's new transport minister.

The company was concerned about regulations that will require drivers to undergo police background checks.

Uber drivers will also need to complete 35 hours of training, before being allowed to pick up passengers.

Those rules came out in September, almost a year after the provincial government agreed to let Uber operate in Quebec on a trial basis.

New provincial transport minister Andre Fortin said on Friday that current Uber drivers will now have up to two years to get police background checks, as opposed to going through a criminal check with a private company.

Drivers who sign on after 15 October will need to complete the check within eight weeks.

All Uber drivers will still need to complete the extended training course, placing them on par with taxi drivers in Quebec.

Mr Fortin said in a statement that "this simple change does not change Uber's obligations" and that it was an issue of "fairness for all market partners and for user safety".

Uber has 50 office staff and about 10,000 drivers across Quebec, which includes Canada's second largest city, Montreal.


Media captionTwo Uber drivers take opposing views on how the company should treat them
The global company on Friday also filed an appeal against a decision by London authorities to deny it a licence to operate in the city.

London transport authorities refused Uber a new private hire licence, saying the ride-hailing firm was not fit and proper on the grounds of "public safety and security implications".

Uber has been roiled by a string of controversies in recent months.

In July, chief executive Travis Kalanick, who helped found the company in 2009, resigned following a series of scandals and criticism of his management style.

In June, 20 staff were sacked in the US after a law firm investigated complaints made to the company about sexual harassment, bullying and retaliation for reporting problems.

Last year, Uber lost a landmark employment tribunal in the UK which ruled drivers should be classed as workers rather than being self-employed.
They dont want to lose Quebec and London in the same month.

It wouldnt impress investors.

"The thing about bluffing Mr. Bond, is that sometimes you've got to have the cards." -- Le Chiffre - Casino Royale
 

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UberBastid

Well-Known Member
What the Mayor of Montréal said about it was similar to "Si ça plait pas Uber, y peut câlicer son camp de Québec". It would be a violation of Forum Rules to render that into it's English equivalent.
And, the best I can tell is that is would NOT be a violation of Forum Rules, because the above, translated to The Kings English means, "If you do not like Uber, you can cuddle his camp in Quebec."
HooooKay. That might be an insult - in French.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
"If you do not like Uber, you can cuddle his camp in Quebec."
HooooKay. That might be an insult - in French.
Translation programs are notoriously bad. Further, the programs for French tend to translate français métropolitain. Français québecois is somewhat different. The swear words in Québec French tend to be ecclesiastical terms and they have the force of certain words in the English language that have Anglo-Saxon origins. The Québec French verb "câlicer" comes from the noun "câlice", which means "chalice". It is one of the stronger foul words in Québec French.
 

TwoFiddyMile

Well-Known Member
Uber is being backed into corners it previously bought it's way out of.
The SoftBank deal only brought in about 1.2 billion.
At over 2.5 billion per annum loss, Uber really can't afford to buy it's way out of trouble any more.
Add to that the Waymo lawsuit and it's transparent that will be at least another billion up in smoke- Uber will lose the Waymo battle.
 

UberBastid

Well-Known Member
Translation programs are notoriously bad. Further, the programs for French tend to translate français métropolitain. Français québecois is somewhat different. The swear words in Québec French tend to be ecclesiastical terms and they have the force of certain words in the English language that have Anglo-Saxon origins. The Québec French verb "câlicer" comes from the noun "câlice", which means "chalice". It is one of the stronger foul words in Québec French.
And the bible makes reference to the chalice as being the receptacle ... and it is used to almost as a euphemism to talk about vagina and womb. The female being 'the receptacle' or the chalice or holder of 'the seed of man.'
And, yes, translation programs can get one in trouble.
 
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