Driving with yellow warning lights on the dash

Coachman

Well-Known Member
I took my car into the shop an hour ago because my check engine light came on. I took a Lyft home, and noticed the car had two yellow warning lights on... the check engine light and the tire pressure warning light.

How many drivers just drive around and ignore these warning lights?
 

ANT 7

Well-Known Member
I always look for that too.

As a pax, I've seen a lot of brake pad warning lights, check engine lights, tire pressure warning lights, and other assorted dash lights on from time to time.

Nothing wrong with my car though. We have a 10 year vehicle age limit, as well as a 6 month provincial inspection requirement here, so it's hard to drive for long with a fault code showing or a sketchy car.
 

Atom guy

Well-Known Member
My car occasionally has a brain fart and flashes the check engine or the TPMS. I ignore them, because if I keep driving, they, just go away on their own. I drive a Chevy, so BS like that is just expected. Nobody has every complained about the lights.
 

Coachman

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
So I got my estimate from the repair shop just now.

Engine diagnostics
Replace purge valve
Replace spark plugs
Fuel injector maintenance
Oil change
Brake pad replacement
Air filter
Cabin air filter

Total estimate of $1,500

I told them to do the spark plugs and air filter and I'll take care of the rest later. And I need to find a cheaper shop.
 

ConkeyCrack

Well-Known Member
My very first car had a check engine light when I purchased it. Turned out I had a bad catty. Never got it fixed and drove around for 2 years until it crapped out on me
 

kingcorey321

Well-Known Member
So I got my estimate from the repair shop just now.

Engine diagnostics
Replace purge valve
Replace spark plugs
Fuel injector maintenance
Oil change
Brake pad replacement
Air filter
Cabin air filter

Total estimate of $1,500

I told them to do the spark plugs and air filter and I'll take care of the rest later. And I need to find a cheaper shop.
ok screw the purge valve .
The purge valve is the part of the vehicle Evaporative Emission Control (EVAP) system. The EVAP system prevents fuel vapors in the fuel tank from escaping into the atmosphere. The EVAP system traps fuel vapors from the fuel tank and temporarily stores them in the charcoal canister fuel injector cleaning sure . Hit the auto parts store when your low on gas put fuel injection cleaner into the tank drive a half hour then fill up. There cleaned . cabin air filter . I take them out of my cars the heat will get hotter and the ac will get colder . And you will have more air flow .
 

Canaddar

Active Member
Coachman, a couple of tidbits for you.....

First, you can take your car into any auto parts store and ask them to put a code reader on it. They will come out, read the codes and tell you what the probable causes are for your lights. Go to a different store and do it again.......great way to get a down and dirty assessment for free. Going to two shops gives you piece of mind in knowing that two people think the same thing.

Second, do your own air filters. You can buy them cheaper at an auto parts store and install them yourself, saving you the $90+ per hour labor to do it. As far as car maintenance goes, very few things are easier to do than an air filter.

Fuel injectors, you may be able to just run an additive thru a tank of gas and get near to the same effect as a cleaning. A lot of times the shops just look at a book and say.......30k miles, you need an injector cleaning. It does not mean that you must have one. For example, on my car, the manufacturer calls for 10,000 mile oil changes (I do 5k and run full synthetic which is overkill, but it makes me feel better). But, I can go to any oil change place and get an oil change.....and the sticker that they put on the window says return in 3 months or 3,000 miles for the next oil change. Why? Because they want to over service your car to make money.

Spark plugs do wear out....but they also can last a really really long time. Key to this is using good gas and not burning oil. Burning oil will clog them up rather quickly. Avoid low traffic gas stations, or those places that are just shady looking. Saving a couple of pennies per gallon is not worth chancing water in the fuel, or bad gas. Sticking with the places that see a lot of business will help with that because their gas is used up often and constantly being replenished with new stock.

On some cars, the tire pressure light can come on because the spare is low. So make sure you check the air on that tire as well.

Most of the stuff that your shop came back with has nothing to do with a check engine light.

Brake pads and oil changes, don't pick those as an area to put off until later. Aside from the safety aspect of it, putting them off until later can greatly increase your cost. Let your brake pads get too bad and they can damage other parts, causing you to have to spend much more to fix it. My sister (the knucklehead) and her husband (knucklehead 2), were not doing oil changes and ended up paying $10k to replace the engine in their truck (was not worth replacing it either imo). They are the extreme end of what you can screw up putting off oil changes, but there are smaller cost items and overall wear of the engine that can also occur.
 
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[email protected]

Well-Known Member
On one of my old cars, a tech broke one of the TPMS sensors and refused to admit guilt (and I had no money to replace it myself). I was young (early 20s) so I feel like they took advantage of that. The TPMS light was off before they replaced the tires, then it was on when they were done. That damn light stayed on for YEARS. I don't have that sort of issue now (I'm not so easily taken advantage of and I also have money to quickly fix something they deal with the guilty party later), so you won't catch me driving around with lights lit on my dash - definitely never have a pax in my car with a light on. That said, if I was in the position I was in many moons ago and I had to pick up pax, I'd at least put a piece of black electrical tape over the light so it wasn't that noticable to a pax. 😁
 

TomTheAnt

Well-Known Member
So I got my estimate from the repair shop just now.

Engine diagnostics
Replace purge valve
Replace spark plugs
Fuel injector maintenance
Oil change
Brake pad replacement
Air filter
Cabin air filter

Total estimate of $1,500

I told them to do the spark plugs and air filter and I'll take care of the rest later. And I need to find a cheaper shop.
Since we don't know what the CEL code was for (I'm suspecting an EVAP code P04xx since replacing the purge valve was suggested), changing plugs and air filter will most likely not cause the CEL to go away.

Oh... And I hate having any warning lights on, so I will always fix what ever needs fixing asap.
 
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observer

Well-Known Member
Moderator
I've had a check engine light on my sons 2000 Camry for several months. The p401 code says it could be one of three parts. We've replaced all three parts with new ones and the damn light still won't come off.

I've taken it to 3 different mechanics and they all say it's the same 3 parts. Everything works fine except the light.

Problem is the car needs to pass smog to get new registration tags.
 

Illini

Well-Known Member
I've had a check engine light on my sons 2000 Camry for several months. The p401 code says it could be one of three parts. We've replaced all three parts with new ones and the damn light still won't come off.

I've taken it to 3 different mechanics and they all say it's the same 3 parts. Everything works fine except the light.

Problem is the car needs to pass smog to get new registration tags.
The trouble code needs to be cleared out. Once it is, the light will go out, and if the problem was one of those 3 parts, the light will stay out.
 

TomTheAnt

Well-Known Member
The trouble code needs to be cleared out. Once it is, the light will go out, and if the problem was one of those 3 parts, the light will stay out.
If the part/s that cause the light to come on have been replaced and the OBD2 monitor is not detecting any issues, the light will turn off after certain drive cycles have been completed. They don't always have to be reset with a reader.

So, in @observer's case, there are still parameters that are not within specs and have not caused the light to turn off. Needs more investigation.
 

Canaddar

Active Member
If the part/s that cause the light to come on have been replaced and the OBD2 monitor is not detecting any issues, the light will turn off after certain drive cycles have been completed. They don't always have to be reset with a reader.

So, in @observer's case, there are still parameters that are not within specs and have not caused the light to turn off. Needs more investigation.
I had an old Prius (2008) that would periodically get a check engine light on. I could reset the power to everything (disconnect the battery for a minute) and the light would go out and stay out for weeks, sometimes a month or two. Apparently I had an air sensor going bad. It worked most of the time, but if it had a moment of confusion, the light came on. Most of the time, I just ignored it. :smiles:
 

observer

Well-Known Member
Moderator
The trouble code needs to be cleared out. Once it is, the light will go out, and if the problem was one of those 3 parts, the light will stay out.
If the part/s that cause the light to come on have been replaced and the OBD2 monitor is not detecting any issues, the light will turn off after certain drive cycles have been completed. They don't always have to be reset with a reader.

So, in @observer's case, there are still parameters that are not within specs and have not caused the light to turn off. Needs more investigation.
It's been reset by the mechanic after changing each part. We've even changed two of the parts multiple times thinking maybe they were faulty brand new.

The light comes back on after driving about 30 miles or so.

All the parts seem to be functioning like they should because you can feel with your finger when the diaphragm in the valve opens.
 

Ubertool

Member
I've had a check engine light on my sons 2000 Camry for several months. The p401 code says it could be one of three parts. We've replaced all three parts with new ones and the damn light still won't come off.

I've taken it to 3 different mechanics and they all say it's the same 3 parts. Everything works fine except the light.

Problem is the car needs to pass smog to get new registration tags.
Not sure what parts you’ve already replaced , however I’ve owned many Toyota’s that have needed the check engine light to go out for emissions to pass and on 9/10 I changed the mass air flow sensor ( 2 minutes to change by even an amateur ( you tube) . And this has done the trick , as a matter of fact this is the case with 3 of my Toyota’s in the past 3 years . Hope this helps , mass air flow sensor can be bought at any local auto store for around $85 or so
 
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