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Driving vs sitting still.

Unleaded

Active Member
This topic has been gone over thousands of times. I find the popular school of thought to "sit still, driving around wastes gas".
However lately..I notice UNLESS I drive around, I DO NOT get any pings.
That’s about right. You don’t have to really go out of your way, but driving short distances in various directions will result in your possibly being “the closest available car” for pool, express pool, X, or XL if you qualify. Sitting still in one random location is not a great strategy, unless you are at a train station, college campus, or popular shopping location, etc.... or whatever works for you based on your experience and trip history.
 

Coachman

Well-Known Member
I've thought for some time that Uber's algorithm favors cars that are moving over cars that are sitting still. Especially if you are sitting still in a parking lot off the main road. As for the reason... if the car is not moving there's a good chance the driver is sitting on the toilet in a 7-Eleven bathroom somewhere.
 

OldBay

Well-Known Member
I've thought for some time that Uber's algorithm favors cars that are moving over cars that are sitting still. Especially if you are sitting still in a parking lot off the main road. As for the reason... if the car is not moving there's a good chance the driver is sitting on the toilet in a 7-Eleven bathroom somewhere.
Yes, this.

Also it has to reward drivers who are actually "out there", not just sitting at home playing xbox.
 

Unleaded

Active Member
Yes, this.

Also it has to reward drivers who are actually "out there", not just sitting at home playing xbox.
A driver taking a much needed and required bathroom break between ride requests is very smart. This means that he or she will be ready for action, whether it be a short trip or a long trip whenever it is received. Preparation is so important contributing to readiness.
 

Azpilot2211

Member
I've thought for some time that Uber's algorithm favors cars that are moving over cars that are sitting still. Especially if you are sitting still in a parking lot off the main road. As for the reason... if the car is not moving there's a good chance the driver is sitting on the toilet in a 7-Eleven bathroom somewhere.
Not true. Anytime I am on the pot so to speak, I am guaranteed a request!
 

BigRedDriver

Well-Known Member
Pick a few spots in town that are good for pickup requests. After drop off, start heading to one of those locations.

Since I am no longer driving I will tell you what my two spots were in my market. If anyone reads this in my market, I don’t care anymore.

1 was the middle of what is known as “the hay market”

2 was the airport

I used to sit and wait. My average daily take was between $100 - $150.

I started dropping off pax and almost immediately started heading to one of those two locations and my daily take started immediately raising to between $165 to $235 a day during the slowest time of the year.

I would only make it to my specific locations 10% of the time. Normally I started picking up rides far before getting to them, and even when I reached them, I would get a ride almost immediately.

The other thing was that my minimum fee rides became fewer. My rides became longer and more profitable. I might get a minimum ride, but it was always backed up by a long, very good ride.

Before doing this, I had not gotten a 45+ mile ride in 3 months. Once I started doing it, they became almost daily.

Why? I can only guess, but as someone pointed out, it may be that they saw me moving implying I am actively looking to work?

All I know is that the system increased my daily nut.

Last thing. After starting this, my Uber trips went way up, Lyft went way down. So I’m guessing Uber and Lyft look at movement differently
 
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welikecamping

Well-Known Member
I drive to my "fishing holes" and stop and wait. Usually will wait in one spot no more than thirty minutes. When it's 115 degrees out, I wait 15 minutes then find a new spot.
 

ZenUber

Well-Known Member
If I’m not getting pings, all I have to do is head towards a bathroom. The more I have to go, the sooner I get the ping. In the six months I’ve been driving, the only way I get a RR break is to turn the app off. I think there’s some mysterious quantum mechanics involved.
 

ANT 7

Well-Known Member
I will sit for an hour, and then move, if it is a normally hot area I am located in.

As for the OP's question, I really don't know the answer.
 

TemptingFate

Well-Known Member
If I’m not getting pings, all I have to do is head towards a bathroom. The more I have to go, the sooner I get the ping. In the six months I’ve been driving, the only way I get a RR break is to turn the app off. I think there’s some mysterious quantum mechanics involved.
Uber has all toilets mapped by GPS. When the algorithm sees a driver on a toilet, it raises ping priority to the highest level. This keeps ants on the road ready to serve the community rather than their own bodily functions. Controlling workers' bathroom time is a powerful psychological tool to increase corporate control of the work force, modelled on Jeff Bezos' efforts to reduce bathroom breaks at Amazon.
Eventually ants learn to go to a toilet when they want to drive, not when they want to pee. When they learn to pee while they drive, they become super ants.
 

Stevie The magic Unicorn

Well-Known Member
OP that’s a difficult question.

If the spot your in isn’t a “good place for pings” then by all means drive somewhere busier.

There’s also many neighborhoods I will work but I won’t park to wait for rides. Meaning as soon as I drop I start driving so where else.

There’s also predominantly housing areas with few “public” places to park. I don’t wait in those areas either.

As for Uber only giving you pings if your moving?

That I have no clue, your guess is as good as mine. But I DO get Uber pings while parked so there’s that. (I average less than 1 Uber ping per day honestly, with no lyft pings)
 

Bassim

New Member
Hey everyone, I will be driving for uber next weekend in Nashville, Tennessee.
Any suggestions on what are the good areas and times? And if there are other advices.
Also I would like to ask about what's the range for 6 hours working?


Thanks in advance
 

rkozy

Well-Known Member
This topic has been gone over thousands of times. I find the popular school of thought to "sit still, driving around wastes gas".
However lately..I notice UNLESS I drive around, I DO NOT get any pings.
I've tested this extensively. It makes no difference. If I drive around waiting for a ping, I'll get one at the same frequency and within the same time-frame as when I'm parked at a strip mall with my engine shut off. It's luck of the draw. It's being in the right place/time where a ride request has just been made, and hoping you're the car closest to the mark.

To borrow a bit from the late, great George Carlin on prayer:

I noticed that all the prayers I used to offer to God, and all the prayers I now offer to Joe Pesci, are being answered at about the same fifty percent rate. Half the time I get what I want, half the time I don't...Same as the four-leaf clover and the horseshoe...same as the voodoo lady who tells you your fortune by squeezing the goat's testicles. It's all the same...so just pick your superstition, sit back, make a wish, and enjoy yourself..
 

Unleaded

Active Member
Uber has all toilets mapped by GPS. When the algorithm sees a driver on a toilet, it raises ping priority to the highest level. This keeps ants on the road ready to serve the community rather than their own bodily functions. Controlling workers' bathroom time is a powerful psychological tool to increase corporate control of the work force, modelled on Jeff Bezos' efforts to reduce bathroom breaks at Amazon.
Eventually ants learn to go to a toilet when they want to drive, not when they want to pee. When they learn to pee while they drive, they become super ants.
When in doubt or in emergencies, drivers can depend on Depends!
 
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