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Driving tips 101

M62

Active Member
While I'm not pro myself, I wouldn't say it can't work for some. Where I drive though, by the time I've declined pings from sketchy areas, low rated pax, and crappy pick up locations. I imagine I'd have more than used up pro's 15% decline allotment, before I could even start to decline based on trip direction and distance.
 
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sheonlydrivesdays

Active Member
Often I read a post up here talkin about AR's and CR's don't matter. These same Ops make fun of Uber Pro. So they are operating their business with very limited information provided in the ride request.
The same Ops also talked about rejecting rides to grocery stores, schools, multi stop trips etc.
So I'm wondering how do these people know all of this information ahead of time? With only 5 seconds to decide.
I can see that after they accept they look at the address where the pickup is. At which point they can make a cancellation. But the address doesn't always tell you exactly where you're going.
I do the Uber Pro thing. I appreciate having that little bit extra information. If there is a better way to do it without worrying about percentages and rates I'd love to know what it is they're doing.
I totally get what you are trying to figure out. It has also baffled me. As far as I know unless you accept to see location, then cancel if it's Walmart, there is no way to know what you're declining. And sometimes the location does not have the name Walmart or the Piggly Wiggly or whatever. Just a street address.

With pro you can see the length of the ride you're accepting. But many posters here are saying they decline half the rides they're offered which begs the question: why? Based on what? If they're declining that many they can't be part of the pro program so they can't see any info about the ride. So what is the decision to decline based on? Magic 8 ball?
 

R3drang3r

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #43
I totally get what you are trying to figure out. It has also baffled me. As far as I know unless you accept to see location, then cancel if it's Walmart, there is no way to know what you're declining. And sometimes the location does not have the name Walmart or the Piggly Wiggly or whatever. Just a street address.

With pro you can see the length of the ride you're accepting. But many posters here are saying they decline half the rides they're offered which begs the question: why? Based on what? If they're declining that many they can't be part of the pro program so they can't see any info about the ride. So what is the decision to decline based on? Magic 8 ball?
Exactly, you got it. That's what I want to know.
 

CorkyB

Member
All right so I've read up here all about Uber Pro sucks. All the comments about ratings don't pay your bills. AR and CR don't matter.
So here's what I want to know. You receive a request with only two bits of information. Distance to pick up and the Pax rating. So how do you know what to accept and what to reject?
I get the part about the pickup being too far. But other than that how do you know what kind of a trip you're accepting.
Please share with me how you make good business decisions on deciding which rides to accept.
Here's how it works for me: I start around 5:30 am and the first ride has to be going north or east or northeast. If it says south or west or southwest I decline. It's almost the only thing I decline so my acceptance rate is fine.
And I love getting the rematches at the airports!
So based on the times and days I choose to drive and the location of my starting place in the morning, Pro works really well for me.
 

BCS DRIVER

Well-Known Member
They cannot take away 'stop new requests', as the whole point is, that is like clocking out from work.
A word about that "feature". My market is chock full of short rides. If I'm in a surge cloud and pick up a ride it 9 times out of 10 will take me out of the cloud. I use the Stop Requests on that ride to prevent me from getting a base rate ping and go back online until after I get back into the cloud. As far as them doing away with that feature you're correct in that it usually means you're done for your shift. But they could, if you use Stop Requests, give a 30 minute time out until allowed to go back online.
 

Nats121

Well-Known Member
If Uber gave that information out, non lucrative pings would never get rides
Sure they would, but it would cost Uber A LOT MORE MONEY to get them accepted.

Uber saves BILLIONS of dollars per year in driver payouts by hiding destinations.

On the flip side, not knowing destinations COSTS drivers BILLIONS of dollars per year in lost income.

That's why Uber does it.
 

Ssgcraig

Well-Known Member
Sure they would, but it would cost Uber A LOT MORE MONEY to get them accepted.

Uber saves BILLIONS of dollars per year in driver payouts by hiding destinations.

On the flip side, not knowing destinations COSTS drivers BILLIONS of dollars per year in lost income.

That's why Uber does it.
I am sure it has nothing to do with drivers that would discriminate if they new the destinations. There are probably many reasons, but money isn't the only one.
 

Nats121

Well-Known Member
I am sure it has nothing to do with drivers that would discriminate if they new the destinations. There are probably many reasons, but money isn't the only one.
You're damned right I'd "discriminate" against shitty rides if I knew the destinations in advance. So would most drivers. That's why uber hides the desinations.

I wouldn't go to any destination in a heavy-traffic area unless I was being paid substantially more.

I wouldn't go to any destination in the middle of nowhere unless I was being paid substantially more.

I wouldn't go to any destination outside of my "work area" unless I was being paid substantially more.

I wouldn't take any supermarket or Walmart trips unless I was being paid substantially more.

Etc, etc, etc.

There aren't "many" reasons as far as uber is concerned. You're trying to make it a lot more complicated than it is.

It's about the MONEY.

Uber pockets BILLIONS of extra dollars every year by hiding destinations.

Drivers LOSE billions of dollars every year because they don't know the destinations in advance.
 
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Ssgcraig

Well-Known Member
You're damned right I'd "discriminate" against shitty rides if I knew the destinations in advance. So would most drivers. That's why uber hides the desinations.

I wouldn't go to any destination in a heavy-traffic area unless I was being paid substantially more.

I wouldn't go to any destination in the middle of nowhere unless I was being paid substantially more.

I wouldn't go to any destination outside of my "work area" unless I was being paid substantially more.

I wouldn't take any supermarket or Walmart trips unless I was being paid substantially more.

Etc, etc, etc.

There aren't "many" reasons. You're trying to make it a lot more complicated than it is.

It's about the MONEY.

Uber pockets BILLIONS of extra dollars every year by hiding destinations.

Drivers LOSE billions of dollars every year because they don't know the destinations in advance.
I got the idea 4 years ago. Your post proves my point.
 

Nats121

Well-Known Member
I got the idea 4 years ago. Your post proves my point.
When you said "discriminate", I'm assuming you meant racial discrimination.

Maybe you're not aware of it, but when pay rates were much higher in 2013-14, minority pax faced FAR LESS discrimination than they do now.

Minority community leaders praised uber and lyft for providing service to neighborhoods that had long been avoided by taxis.

That all changed AFTER the massive pay cuts.

Uber doesn't give a shit about civil rights, they only care about their bottom line.
 

Chorch

Well-Known Member
Just finished reading the whole post.

@z_z_z_ I have a question from your post. Why wouldn’t you go into a driveway to do a U-turn? I do it sometimes because it’s comfortable...
 

Ssgcraig

Well-Known Member
When you said "discriminate", I'm assuming you meant racial discrimination.

Maybe you're not aware of it, but when pay rates were much higher in 2013-14, minority pax faced FAR LESS discrimination than they do now.

Minority community leaders praised uber and lyft for providing service to neighborhoods that had long been avoided by taxis.

That all changed AFTER the massive pay cuts.

Uber doesn't give a shit about civil rights, they only care about their bottom line.
Whoa, I didn't say anything about race. The word discriminate encompasses more than race, maybe your not aware of that.
 

Nats121

Well-Known Member
Whoa, I didn't say anything about race. The word discriminate encompasses more than race, maybe your not aware of that.
Then tell us what you meant.

Uber's always used the excuse of racial discrimination to justify hiding destinations from the drivers.
 

Nats121

Well-Known Member
Time to take the horse blinders off. Discriminate against short rides, against non-lucrative rides. I think I said that earlier. You bringing up race is just typical of todays society.
I've stated in several posts that hiding destinations puts money into uber's coffers and takes money out of drivers' pockets, and that's why uber hides them.

You argued and said drivers would "discriminate".

When I asked you what you meant by discriminate, the examples were all related to drivers refusing rides because of MONEY.

You argued then you proceeded to make my points.
 

flataffect

Member
I've stated in several posts that hiding destinations puts money into uber's coffers and takes money out of drivers' pockets, and that's why uber hides them.

You argued and said drivers would "discriminate".

When I asked you what you meant by discriminate, the examples were all related to drivers refusing rides because of MONEY.

You argued then you proceeded to make my points.
Explain to me what “discriminating taste” means. Not everything is a marxist dog whistle.
 

Ssgcraig

Well-Known Member
I've stated in several posts that hiding destinations puts money into uber's coffers and takes money out of drivers' pockets, and that's why uber hides them.

You argued and said drivers would "discriminate".

When I asked you what you meant by discriminate, the examples were all related to drivers refusing rides because of MONEY.

You argued then you proceeded to make my points.
Yes, drivers would discriminate for money and location. As I said earlier, those $4 trips wouldn't get rides if the trip destination was shown. I do not think I made your point as you were referring to Uber, not the drivers. Maybe I did not elaborate enough.

If Uber showed the destination, shit rides wouldn't get a ride, or they would have to wait much longer. Hence they would be discriminated. Which we a now full circle to when you first replied to me.
 

OldBay

Well-Known Member
Actually it is a serious post. I read over and over again up here Ops saying that all those things don't matter. Things like ratings, CR and AR. So I'm really curious how these same Ops make good business decisions when deciding which rides to accept.
My market doesnt tell direction, but it tells time. This can be used as an educated guess where its going, based on traffic patterns at that time of day.

A 35 minute morning trip is BWI (good). A 50 minute morning trip is DC (not so good).

The trip duration can be used to weed out the "boundary conditions"; trips that are too short to be profitable, and ones that are going to an area that will probably require a deadhead back. I'm not using it all the time to cherrypick, I still take almost everything.

It can also be used to decide if its worth keeping the other app on. If I'm doing a longer pickup for a somewhat unprofitable trip on Lyft, I will keep Uber on and if something better comes up, I will cancel on Lyft. If I didnt know the duration, I wouldn't know if its (potentially) better than the lyft trip.
 
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M62

Active Member
Yes, drivers would discriminate for money and location. As I said earlier, those $4 trips wouldn't get rides if the trip destination was shown. I do not think I made your point as you were referring to Uber, not the drivers. Maybe I did not elaborate enough.

If Uber showed the destination, shit rides wouldn't get a ride, or they would have to wait much longer. Hence they would be discriminated. Which we a now full circle to when you first replied to me.
I think he agrees with you on that. He just says that rates should be raised to correct that.

I disagree that higher rates would eliminate cherry picking though. If ride A is better than ride B at current rates, then it is still better than ride B if rates are doubled or trippled, and a savvy driver will still cherry pick if they have the option. Just that with higher rates, a driver might take ride A if there is no likely alternative, whereas at current rates they might not even do that. The other possibility is to raise rates more on shorter rides in order to icentivize them.

As for discrimination due to bad neighborhood. I think higher rates would mitigate, but not eliminate that.
 
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