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Does Uber Think Cincinnati Drivers Are That Stupid?

jrich6234

Active Member
Uber is trying to pull a fast one on Cincinnati drivers -

Since they changed how Surge works, Uber is finding it more and more difficult to get drivers to spread out during peak hours.

Their solution - using their infamous “Greyball” software on us to give us fake rides.

Now before you blow the doors off my car with negative responses, let me tell you how I discovered Uber’s latest trick.

Last week, I was working Friday night after 10 p.m. (attempting to complete a “Quest”), when I received a ping to pickup a rider. It was some distance north of downtown and during a Surge event.

Okay, I thought.

Every one needs a ride and I can always come back after I drop off the passenger. So off I went, 15 minutes to pickup location.

When I arrived, I waited the two minutes and texted the passenger that I had arrived and was waiting for them. No response.

I waited another minute and called. No answer.

So I waited the required five minutes and cancelled. As I was traveling back to downtown, I get another ping from a half-mile away. I took it and again, waited the two minutes and texted.

No response.

I called and went straight to voicemail.

Then I noticed something different about rider information in the the app.

Normally, when you arrive at the pickup location, the text “Rider Notified” appears in the center - just above the rider’s name, with a countdown timer for the two minute waiting period and the three minute hold before you are allowed to cancel the ride.

There was NO timer above the rider’s name.

And when I canceled the ride after five minutes - I DID NOT get a cancellation fee.

So, now I have spent almost half an hour in an area making no money and getting no closer to completing my Quest.

So I decided to go “Offline”, return downtown and go back Online.

After 45 minutes, it happened again. A ride deep across the river in Kentucky, I arrived and no response.

Again, NO Timer.

So I cancelled and left the area.

So the moral of the story - pay attention to your screens in the app.

The devil is in the details.
 
Uber is trying to pull a fast one on Cincinnati drivers -

Since they changed how Surge works, Uber is finding it more and more difficult to get drivers to spread out during peak hours.

Their solution - using their infamous “Greyball” software on us to give us fake rides.

Now before you blow the doors off my car with negative responses, let me tell you how I discovered Uber’s latest trick.

Last week, I was working Friday night after 10 p.m. (attempting to complete a “Quest”), when I received a ping to pickup a rider. It was some distance north of downtown and during a Surge event.

Okay, I thought.

Every one needs a ride and I can always come back after I drop off the passenger. So off I went, 15 minutes to pickup location.

When I arrived, I waited the two minutes and texted the passenger that I had arrived and was waiting for them. No response.

I waited another minute and called. No answer.

So I waited the required five minutes and cancelled. As I was traveling back to downtown, I get another ping from a half-mile away. I took it and again, waited the two minutes and texted.

No response.

I called and went straight to voicemail.

Then I noticed something different about rider information in the the app.

Normally, when you arrive at the pickup location, the text “Rider Notified” appears in the center - just above the rider’s name, with a countdown timer for the two minute waiting period and the three minute hold before you are allowed to cancel the ride.

There was NO timer above the rider’s name.

And when I canceled the ride after five minutes - I DID NOT get a cancellation fee.

So, now I have spent almost half an hour in an area making no money and getting no closer to completing my Quest.

So I decided to go “Offline”, return downtown and go back Online.

After 45 minutes, it happened again. A ride deep across the river in Kentucky, I arrived and no response.

Again, NO Timer.

So I cancelled and left the area.

So the moral of the story - pay attention to your screens in the app.

The devil is in the details.
Of course they think we are stupid. Even worse, they think we are suckers. Or they would be paying us more. A normal business would want a stable happy workforce making a livable wage that would provide good service to their customers. But I digress, heh
I have not had your problem... YET. Have you tried asking Uber about this? As far as I know, the only way to communicate with Uber is on the Uber Twitter Help page. I posted there when I first joined Uber with a question about the KY inspection and they got right back to me with a satisfactory answer.
Try that and let us all know what they say.
ahh.gif
 

nouberipo

Well-Known Member
Uber is trying to pull a fast one on Cincinnati drivers -

Since they changed how Surge works, Uber is finding it more and more difficult to get drivers to spread out during peak hours.

Their solution - using their infamous “Greyball” software on us to give us fake rides.

Now before you blow the doors off my car with negative responses, let me tell you how I discovered Uber’s latest trick.

Last week, I was working Friday night after 10 p.m. (attempting to complete a “Quest”), when I received a ping to pickup a rider. It was some distance north of downtown and during a Surge event.

Okay, I thought.

Every one needs a ride and I can always come back after I drop off the passenger. So off I went, 15 minutes to pickup location.

When I arrived, I waited the two minutes and texted the passenger that I had arrived and was waiting for them. No response.

I waited another minute and called. No answer.

So I waited the required five minutes and cancelled. As I was traveling back to downtown, I get another ping from a half-mile away. I took it and again, waited the two minutes and texted.

No response.

I called and went straight to voicemail.

Then I noticed something different about rider information in the the app.

Normally, when you arrive at the pickup location, the text “Rider Notified” appears in the center - just above the rider’s name, with a countdown timer for the two minute waiting period and the three minute hold before you are allowed to cancel the ride.

There was NO timer above the rider’s name.

And when I canceled the ride after five minutes - I DID NOT get a cancellation fee.

So, now I have spent almost half an hour in an area making no money and getting no closer to completing my Quest.

So I decided to go “Offline”, return downtown and go back Online.

After 45 minutes, it happened again. A ride deep across the river in Kentucky, I arrived and no response.

Again, NO Timer.

So I cancelled and left the area.

So the moral of the story - pay attention to your screens in the app.

The devil is in the details.
you titled this post...."does Uber think Cincinnati drivers are that stupid?" You then proceed to state the scenario in which you drove 15 minutes for a ping. I think you not only answered your own question but you also confirmed this with the Uber algorithm.
 

jrich6234

Active Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
you titled this post...."does Uber think Cincinnati drivers are that stupid?" You then proceed to state the scenario in which you drove 15 minutes for a ping. I think you not only answered your own question but you also confirmed this with the Uber algorithm.
Are you familiar with Cincinnati or do you just spend time trolling various posts? You can go from Downtown to Mad Tree in fifteen minutes and that’s worth the trip if you actually have a pickup.

But then you’re obviously too smart to be a driver because you’re always smarter than everyone else.

smdh...
 
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