Does Uber care about its black passengers?

Cold Fusion

Member
It’s a strange feeling to open the Uber app in a low-income San Francisco neighborhood and know you’ll wait an eternity before a car comes your way.

Drivers don’t flock to the places I frequent — San Francisco’s Bayview and Hunters Point and Fillmore neighborhoods, and across the Bay Bridge in East Oakland. Add in the fact that I’m a young black man — my photo on the app is me wearing a hoodie and baseball cap — asking for a ride out of a neighborhood known for street crime, and my Uber wait times can be more than 30 minutes.

 

peteyvavs

Member
It’s a strange feeling to open the Uber app in a low-income San Francisco neighborhood and know you’ll wait an eternity before a car comes your way.

Drivers don’t flock to the places I frequent — San Francisco’s Bayview and Hunters Point and Fillmore neighborhoods, and across the Bay Bridge in East Oakland. Add in the fact that I’m a young black man — my photo on the app is me wearing a hoodie and baseball cap — asking for a ride out of a neighborhood known for street crime, and my Uber wait times can be more than 30 minutes.

Uber doesn’t accept EBT at this time.
 

1.5xorbust

Well-Known Member
It’s a strange feeling to open the Uber app in a low-income San Francisco neighborhood and know you’ll wait an eternity before a car comes your way.

Drivers don’t flock to the places I frequent — San Francisco’s Bayview and Hunters Point and Fillmore neighborhoods, and across the Bay Bridge in East Oakland. Add in the fact that I’m a young black man — my photo on the app is me wearing a hoodie and baseball cap — asking for a ride out of a neighborhood known for street crime, and my Uber wait times can be more than 30 minutes.

I thought you were a white guy from NYC.
 

mbd

Well-Known Member
It’s a strange feeling to open the Uber app in a low-income San Francisco neighborhood and know you’ll wait an eternity before a car comes your way.

Drivers don’t flock to the places I frequent — San Francisco’s Bayview and Hunters Point and Fillmore neighborhoods, and across the Bay Bridge in East Oakland. Add in the fact that I’m a young black man — my photo on the app is me wearing a hoodie and baseball cap — asking for a ride out of a neighborhood known for street crime, and my Uber wait times can be more than 30 minutes.

Take your pic out and go with your last name and tip 1$. Don’t put Lil, Dr, T, or Bank as your first name. That is a 100% decline.
I got 100% AR,I know how the ping sequence works 😁
Use female friends/ wife/ sister/ mothers App. Few of the brothers do that at night.
 
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LyftUberFuwabolewa

Well-Known Member
You do realize of course that this wasn't Uber's idea. It's in response to the new law.

If community "A" is being shunned by community "B", community "A" needs to take a look at itself.

If in a particular community rideshare drivers have more problems with: riders that have infants with no carseats who get angry and sometimes aggressive when you have to cancel, people eating in the car, having Facetime calls at full volume the entire ride, and zero tips, it's not racist to notice that. It's not racist to want to avoid that.
 

waldowainthrop

Well-Known Member
I thought you were a white guy from NYC.
I’m a white guy from NYC. I want to see Uber (or some kind of private transportation alternative) serve Ward 7 and 8 in DC, Oakland, CA, Detroit, MI. I also want safety for drivers. It’s possible to hold these beliefs at the same time. Growing up in NYC, taxi cab profiling of black and brown passengers was a well-known problem and probably still exists. A lot of black and brown rideshare drivers today express openly that they completely avoid going to high crime and predominantly black neighborhoods. I don’t have a complete set of solutions for it.

Also, @Cold Fusion is just sharing the opinion piece – not everything has an agenda.
 

mbd

Well-Known Member
It is true, if you are a black male, you will be declined by Uber/Lyft drivers. Most drivers are minorities.
Middle East drivers - 95% of the Middle East drivers will not pick up black males in the hood .😁 Outside the hood, they will pick up.
That is according to my analytics report.
Asian drivers- Korean, Viet, Chinese drivers- nope, no chance. Analytics report says 96.2% decline rate. 😁
Pakistani/Bangladesh/Indian - 97.5% decline rate , according to the analytics report😁
 
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waldowainthrop

Well-Known Member
It is true, if you are a black male, you will be declined by Uber/Lyft drivers. Most drivers are minorities.
Middle East drivers - 95% of the Middle East drivers will not pick up black males in the hood .😁 Outside the hood, they will pick up.
That is according to my analytics report.
Asian drivers- Korean, Viet, Chinese drivers- nope, no chance. Analytics report says 96.2% decline rate. 😁
Pakistani/Bangladesh/Indian - 97.5% decline rate , according to the analytics report😁
2% of white passengers feel that they have social license to say something privately racist to their white driver about other people. ✋🏼 👉🏼
 

OG ant

Well-Known Member
It’s a strange feeling to open the Uber app in a low-income San Francisco neighborhood and know you’ll wait an eternity before a car comes your way.

Drivers don’t flock to the places I frequent — San Francisco’s Bayview and Hunters Point and Fillmore neighborhoods, and across the Bay Bridge in East Oakland. Add in the fact that I’m a young black man — my photo on the app is me wearing a hoodie and baseball cap — asking for a ride out of a neighborhood known for street crime, and my Uber wait times can be more than 30 minutes.

I don't why they are making this a race issue when this is more of a safety and location issue, has nothing to do with black folks! No one wants to gamble with thier lifes for couple of dollars!!

White, black, Hispanic, if you live in a high crime area you ain't getting picked up, sorry! Nothing personal, my safety always comes first! Nothing racist about that.

This article is making it seem like people are racist towards black.
 

Diamondraider

Well-Known Member
It’s a strange feeling to open the Uber app in a low-income San Francisco neighborhood and know you’ll wait an eternity before a car comes your way.

Drivers don’t flock to the places I frequent — San Francisco’s Bayview and Hunters Point and Fillmore neighborhoods, and across the Bay Bridge in East Oakland. Add in the fact that I’m a young black man — my photo on the app is me wearing a hoodie and baseball cap — asking for a ride out of a neighborhood known for street crime, and my Uber wait times can be more than 30 minutes.

Uber doesn’t have pax photos. Another SJW looking for something to @@@@@ about.
 

GoldenGoji

Well-Known Member
The writer of the article doesn't seem to know that Uber drivers do NOT see a passenger's picture whenever a ride request comes in. We can't discriminate based on skin color, so it doesn't matter what their picture on their Uber Passenger app is.

Now in terms of locations, of course drivers will have to also think about their own safety. Why in the world would anyone drive to a place where there's a highly likely chance of getting victimized by a fake passenger? Are they saying that Uber drivers are supposed to be these extremely noble, selfless people who would sacrifice their livelihoods and safety for a couple of bucks? Uber drivers are not community service employees. We work for the money. We work to make a living. If we get injured, die, or if our vehicles get carjacked, then people who depend on us, such as our families, will be badly affected.

I believe that it is extremely unfair of people to turn this into some kind of racial issue when it's not. It's a SAFETY issue and of course, a financial issue. Will you be safe when you do business at a certain area? If it's safe, then you have to know, will it be profitable to do business there? It's not a racial issue. We are Uber drivers. We follow where the money is, as long as it's SAFE. Who wants to die for a $5 ride?
 

Diamondraider

Well-Known Member
If you’re waiting for a ride in an area known for street crime, that’s why you’re waiting. I’ve seen Lyft pax photos who were black and wore a hoodie. I’ve picked them up with no issue. However, I don’t pickup in high crime areas.
But the OP said Uber, which makes this b.s.
Post automatically merged:

I’m a white guy from NYC. I want to see Uber (or some kind of private transportation alternative) serve Ward 7 and 8 in DC, Oakland, CA, Detroit, MI. I also want safety for drivers. It’s possible to hold these beliefs at the same time. Growing up in NYC, taxi cab profiling of black and brown passengers was a well-known problem and probably still exists. A lot of black and brown rideshare drivers today express openly that they completely avoid going to high crime and predominantly black neighborhoods. I don’t have a complete set of solutions for it.

Also, @Cold Fusion is just sharing the opinion piece – not everything has an agenda.
Well, if black and brown won’t pick up in bad areas, then the race angle is out the window.

sounds like perceived safety or risk management is in play.
 

waldowainthrop

Well-Known Member
I don't why they are making this a race issue when this is more of a safety and location issue, has nothing to do with black folks! No one wants to gamble with thier lifes for couple of dollars!!

White, black, Hispanic, if you live in a high crime area you ain't getting picked up, sorry! Nothing personal, my safety always comes first! Nothing racist about that.

This article is making it seem like people are racist towards black.
It is a safety issue for drivers, primarily. No one wants to drive somewhere perceived as unsafe.

Socially, it is absolutely a race issue. Even middle class black people are affected by this social phenomenon. Also, some drivers incorrectly conflate race and class and crime risk (as in the case of the black San Francisco Chronicle journalist having trouble getting rides home), which makes it a race issue in individual cases.

I have a policy prescription for this but it involves socialism so I’ll shut up for now. 😅
 

UbaBrah

Well-Known Member
I live and operate in predominantly black neighborhoods and areas. There are countless black drivers here. That's the case all through the south and in just about every large urban area in the US too.

I also wish news publications didn't give these disgruntled segments of society such attention. People of matching colors tend to stick together and distrust the others. And crime statistics aren't in black people's favor. That's just the way it is. But why examine your own demographic when you can lash out at everyone else.
 
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