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Does anyone do uberASSIST?

Discussion in 'Advice' started by miresearch, Oct 29, 2018.

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  1. Just curious (I don't remember). Did you respond to my thread from a few months ago, asking would you be willing to give a blind passenger direction to/from your vehicle?
    How do you feel about trivial cases like that one?
     
  2. JimKE

    JimKE

    Location:
    Miami
    I don't remember that thread.

    I certainly have no problem transporting a blind person (I have), or anyone else with any kind of disability I can manage safely. I drive disabled people pretty regularly, including those with wheelchairs. I have an SUV, so a chair is no problem.

    I also have no problem driving sick people to doctors appointments or medical facilities, as long as they are not emergent. But I have hundreds of hours of training and 11 years of experience as an EMT, so I'm adequately prepared to evaluate those riders. I would not hesitate one second to drive them, nor would I hesitate one second in telling them no and calling rescue if necessary.

    But it's not rational to expect every Uber driver to drive every disabled or sick person who needs a ride. Very few Uber/Lyft drivers have any medical training at all. Those that have some training probably took a basic first aid course 10 years ago -- 100% of which is now outdated, and quite likely the opposite of current protocols! And they have zero workers' comp insurance, most likely no Good Samaritan Law protection, and would be in a very risky situation.
     
  3. Thread was this:
    https://uberpeople.net/threads/star...rider-unique-circumstances-here.266214/page-3
    Long since dead, but it sure gave some interesting perspective on the human race.
     
  4. Atom guy

    Atom guy

    Location:
    CT
    They don't have that in my market, but that doesn't stop the nursing homes from requesting trips for their residents. Annoying.
     
  5. What's wrong with that?
    One day you'll be in a nursing home and you'll be the one annoying someone just so you can continue to exist. Looking forward to it?
     
  6. 1.5xorbust

    1.5xorbust

    Location:
    San Diego
    Once thinking I would be tipped for the additional time and effort. I wasn’t so I haven’t done one since.
     
  7. What was the situation with this ride? What sort of pickup and drop-off location, and circumstances surrounding the passenger's need for ASSIST?
    My thinking is that you could have been dealing with someone who literally had to choose between their Uber ASSIST ride to their medical appointment and food.
    I always tip, but I'm not in the kind of dire situation financially that some handicapped people are in.
     
  8. 1.5xorbust

    1.5xorbust

    Location:
    San Diego
    A senior gentleman on crutches from a doctor’s office to his home.
     
  9. Ah. So my speculation was probably pretty spot on. He's probably stuck on a waiting list for paratransit, and so the majority of his fixed income is being sunk into medical related transportation. Tough situation for all involved. Not fair that he doesn't have the means to offer a gratuity, but not fair that he's now a prisoner in his own home after being a contributing member of society his entire life. Makes you wonder what the point of living is sometimes.
     
  10. All of my wheel chair passengers were picked up doing normal uber x.
    All i do is assist with locking chair wheels.hold door. Stand behind chair to block if it moves.
    Do not Touch passenger unless Asked to help.
     
    Caturria likes this.
  11. Yep. That's really all it is, just be patient and ask and the person will tell you exactly what they need. It's as easy or as hard as you choose to make it.
    It's funny, I think some people need to convince themselves that something is impossible and/or prohibitively difficult in order to make themselves feel better about being the ones truly classifiable as 'disabled'.
     
  12. touberornottouber

    touberornottouber

    Location:
    Volusia County, FL
    Driving:
    UberX
    Around here you can just get a job for non-emergency transport and get $10 an hour using someone else's vehicle. Doing UberAssist wouldn't really make much sense.
     
  13. Are you talking about city paratransit? or just taxi?
     
  14. touberornottouber

    touberornottouber

    Location:
    Volusia County, FL
    Driving:
    UberX
    Here we have non-emergency transport which is basically a taxi for people who need to go to the doctor, etc. They contract with insurance companies and doctors. They usually pay their workers per hour and provide the vehicle which is usually a minivan and sometimes a converted full size type van with a wheelchair lift.
     
  15. I have to ask.
    Are people who are opposed to participating in Uber Assist, and people who feel resentment towards elderly and/or physically challenged pax generally opposed to the idea of humans assisting other humans in general?
    Do you endeavour to complete your lives without ever taking a moment to lend a hand to anyone outside of family?
    Do you find the very idea of compassion destructive and/or abhorrent?
    Would you look at someone helping an elderly person across the street and think 'how sappy and pathetic'?
    Does this place really attract people of that mindset in such astonishing numbers?
     
    Ziplock likes this.
  16. touberornottouber

    touberornottouber

    Location:
    Volusia County, FL
    Driving:
    UberX
    I actually help everyone I get as a passenger just because I am used to that as I was a taxi driver and we did that. Plus I like to help people. For instance a couple of days ago I got a third party ping to take a nice older asian immigrant woman to the doctor. She didn't even know the name of the doctor or place she was going to. I parked my car and actually went inside the building and took her up the elevator to find the right doctor where I confirmed that she was in the right place. I just didn't want to leave her at the wrong place where she was stranded.

    BUT joining a special program where all pings are that and not being compensated anything extra for my time (and the extra time and effort needed) is not acceptable to me. Especially not with the pay being so low already and Uber routinely taking 40%+ of the fare now. I mean today for instance I was online for five hours and Uber only gave me one ping for $5 + $5 tip. Am I supposed to be an ambulance driver now too? For $2 an hour? In my own vehicle??

    And why should the burden be absorbed by the driver? Uber can always charge the same amount and reduce THEIR cut in order to help the disabled passenger. After all it doesn't cost 40% to run the app.

    Another way of looking at this: Do you help every single homeless person you pass on the street? Maybe you help one every now and then. OK. Now would you want every homeless person in your city to knock on your door for food and shelter non-stop? I'm betting not. Is it because you are selfish and inhumane? Not a good person?
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2018 at 6:30 PM
    JimKE and Ziplock like this.
  17. What exactly do you mean by 'all pings are that'?
    I doubt they'd amount to more than 0.5% of overall requests.
    Hypothetically speaking, if Uber waved it's cut on these and passed it on to you (which would be the right thing to do), would this be sufficient? What do you see as a fair going rate for one or two pings a month on average which take two minutes extra?
     
  18. JimKE

    JimKE

    Location:
    Miami
    What you see a lot with issues like this is that affected people understandably have a strong agenda of "fairness"...which to most of us means, "I GET what I WANT!"

    So they naturally present a sensible government service as something that should be a fundamental human right and the moral obligation of everybody else on the planet.

    And if you disagree in the slightest with any part of their agenda, you're obviously an inhuman monster of some sort.

    It may strike us as odd that those same advocates don't apply the same social justice standards to the exploitation of rideshare drivers by venture capitalists...but it is what it is.:rolleyes:

    The problem of transportation for people with disabilities is a very real problem, and one that communities need to address in cases where families cannot, or will not, meet the needs.

    Disability transport is a rightful obligation of government -- and if government is not meeting the need, the remedy it to demand that government explain what they are using your tax dollars for. In many cases, advocates for legitimate needs like transportation for disabled persons would be appalled to learn where their tax money really goes.
     
    touberornottouber likes this.
  19. 68350

    68350

    Location:
    PHX
    Driving:
    UberX
    Uber Assist exists in the Phoenix market. No thanks, when it's the same crappy pay as X. Uber can't CHARGE more, so they will never pay more to drivers. As it is, I get requests from 'gogograndparent' on and off. 99% of the time it is an elderly person who really NEEDS physical assistance, but is too cheap to pay for physical assistance services to give them their ride. I've been declining rides from them, but last week took one that was p/u at a senior care facility. I wanted to do the ride then go back and have a talk with the facility staff to find out what's going on. In this case, she was an independent living resident, who was still allowed to handle all of her own business. I informed the staff and the head of transp, that this woman could not get in and out of my car without help. I had to take hold of her foot and leg and bend and swing her in and out of the car. Totally unacceptable service level to expect from basic X/Lyft drivers. And a big extra waste of time to do such rides. I had one woman last year who couldn't take 3 steps at a time to get from her own front door, down to the curb to my car. And I was expected to walk her back and forth, help her in/out of my car, and had to actually take her inside a clinic to the reg desk and put her hands on the counter and ask someone to come help her, before I could leave.

    Imagine the liability if I didn't provide that help, and she fell while trying to get into the clinic and broke a hip. We aren't paid to do this crap.
     
  20. JimKE

    JimKE

    Location:
    Miami
    The liability exists whether you help her or not. In fact, there is MORE liability if you help her, because the help you give will be evaluated by standards you have probably not been trained to meet. The liability issue is a real landmine for untrained drivers.

    And don't think you are protected from liability if your state happens to be one of the 38 states with Good Samaritan laws, because you are probably NOT. You are being paid to drive that person, and in most cases that compensation excludes you from Good Sam protection.

    I get those kind of rides about once a month...maybe more. I take them and don't mind them -- in fact, I normally enjoy them. But, as I explained above, I have the training and experience to feel comfortable driving riders who need a little extra help.

    That said, if Uber offered UberAssist in Miami, I would NOT sign up for it because of the extra liability.
     

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