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Does anyone do uberASSIST?

Discussion in 'Advice' started by miresearch, Oct 29, 2018.

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  1. miresearch

    miresearch

    Location:
    Michigan
    I am curious what the availability of this option is. Thanks!
     
    tohunt4me and rider25 like this.
  2. Rakos

    Rakos

    Location:
    Tampa Bay
    Driving:
    UberXL
    I thought it was a local Uber thing 8>)

    You call support...

    And they assist you...8>)

    Rakos
    Copy of s-l300-14.jpg
     
  3. Z129

    Z129 Moderator

    You have to watch some videos and take/pass a quiz. You have to break down and store their assistive scooters. The requests are farther away than you can imagine and the pay is the same as X.
     
  4. Uber's Guber

    Uber's Guber

    Location:
    United States
    Driving:
    UberX
    Assist pax NEVER tip, and you have to work harder.
     
  5. miresearch

    miresearch

    Location:
    Michigan
    Thanks for the feedback!
     
    tohunt4me and Z129 like this.
  6. mbd

    mbd

    Location:
    Dallas
    No just rebound , block and steal ;)
     
  7. miresearch

    miresearch

    Location:
    Michigan
    Thanks
     
    Z129 likes this.
  8. JimKE

    JimKE

    Location:
    Miami
    Do they even have Assist any more?

    I don't think we ever had it here. I thought it was something they tested and abandoned.

    I can't imagine voluntarily signing up for extra injury and liability risk!
     
  9. miresearch

    miresearch

    Location:
    Michigan
    Thanks for the info! That is what I am trying to figure out if it is actually available currently.
     
    tohunt4me and Z129 like this.
  10. Z129

    Z129 Moderator

    I use Uber's fare estimator to figure out what options are available in a city. Just enter a pickup location and a destination and see what options are available:

    https://www.uber.com/fare-estimate/
     
  11. Rushmanyyz

    Rushmanyyz

    Location:
    Melbourne
    I just got contacted about Assist again. It's still out there. No way in hell I'd sign up for it without some guarantees.
     
    MoreTips, wonderfulcarscent and Z129 like this.
  12. Don't do it.
     
    Z129 likes this.
  13. uberdriverfornow

    uberdriverfornow

    Location:
    no
    if there was ever a time to tip it would be when the driver has to do such an extra amount of work as driving out of the way and breaking down your equipment and helping you in and out of the car

    not trying to sound cold but just being fair
     
    Danny3xd, MoreTips and Z129 like this.
  14. miresearch

    miresearch

    Location:
    Michigan
    That link is super helpful, thank you!
     
    Z129 likes this.
  15. Uber should make this mandatory. Accessibility is mandatory in basically every other service based industry in the developed world.
     
  16. JimKE

    JimKE

    Location:
    Miami
    Uber can make it mandatory when they provide the vehicles! We're independent contractors -- you can't force us to take any ride, or transport any kind of equipment.

    I'm quite sure most Uber drivers will accommodate a rider with a folding wheelchair without any problem, unless there are too many passengers or the vehicle is simply too small to accommodate a wheelchair. But expecting a driver to break down, load, unload, and re-assemble an ECV is just stupid.

    If government wants that service, government should provide it -- as they do here.
     
  17. I actually want to try my hand at starting up an online community like this one, except for people who are dependant on government paratransit such as myself. Trouble is I have no idea how to promote such a thing and attract members to it.
    The life of a paratransit rider really is that of a puppet. You exist on their terms. They tell you when you can work, when you can play, when you can go home to sleep and what time to wake up. From the hours you spend everyday waiting for them to show up, to the hours you spend waiting because they insisted on dropping you off two hours early for work or an appointment, to the hours you spend waiting on hold to book your next trip, they control more of your life than any employer ever could.
    You're in constant competition for your livelihood with thousands of other people in your community who are in the same boat. If you're lucky enough to be one of the first callers to book for a given day, you get to be somewhat on time for whatever you need to do in life, while the next guy who lost out to you gets to either miss out or settle for being hours early.
    You don't call and a driver is there in ten minutes. You call, roll the dice, and hopefully they'll tell you they'll have somebody there somewhere in the vicinity of your requested time three days to a week from now.
    Then there's always the chance that your driver wants to stop for a burger and doesn't have time to do so because they're on a tight schedule. So they shuffle you to create slack in their schedule and now you're really in a spot and have no choice but to call an Uber or something else to get home.
    So yeah, government transit is something people like myself are eternally grateful for. But it's not the peaches and cream that your city's PR department would like the general public to believe it is.
    That's why when I have to call an Uber and the driver has no problem spending 30 seconds to help me out I feel inclined to worship the ground they walk on. Try living that way for a month and you'll appreciate that sentiment.
    Food for thought.
     
    Hamilton OC likes this.
  18. JimKE

    JimKE

    Location:
    Miami
    I know what you're talking about to some degree. My mother-in-law is disabled and we've just started using the county's STS for her. My uncle has used it in the past, with some of the problems you mention -- but so far so good with MIL.

    Here, there are a number of private transportation companies which provide various levels of accessibility under contract with the county. Our service may be better than most, because it's a big business. You see the vehicles everywhere.

    But this is not a job for Uber drivers, seriously. A paratransit driver needs special training, and often specialized vehicles to do the job right. They also need protection from both their own personal injury and from liability. Uber offers none of that at all.
     
  19. Yeah, I know there are complicated cases. Obviously if somebody has a huge wheelchair they need a bus or something which can accommodate it properly. I can't imagine being an Uber exec who is legally being forced to solve that problem because I don't think there is a solution.
    That said, for most of us, the special training you need is just a little patience and compassion. In my case, I just need to hold on to your arm and have you direct me towards your car from the door, and back again at the destination. No special training required, perfect strangers can do it. You just have to be willing to spend a few extra seconds.
    Around here, all the paratransit drivers get in terms of training is a one day job shadowing session with another driver. They just ride along and watch them do what they do, then they're on their own. I've been picked up by drivers who have trainees with them many times. The trainee is always the one driving but never the one getting out and doing the other components of the job. So they're not getting all that much more than what you'd get with the Uber Assist training video.
    I know people probably think paratransit operators go to school for what they do (that it requires a social work background) but that's just not the case at all.
     
  20. JimKE

    JimKE

    Location:
    Miami
    Nobody at Uber is being forced to solve the problem. Uber is not involved in the problem except in those cities where they offer UberAssist, and I doubt if those are forced situations. Probably something Uber tried as a test, or as a PR initiative.
    Yeah, a lot of people think that -- but it's much more complicated than that. When I went to EMT school, our first 8 hours were on legal issues, and the second 8 hours were on how to move people without hurting them or yourself. It's much more dangerous and complicated than most lay people know, and you can really hurt someone if you do it improperly.
     

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