Does anyone can Help? - Impounded Car- Undercover Trap

Does anyone know what to do for impounded car ?


  • Total voters
    19
  • Poll closed .

Kevin111

New Member
Hi people,

Last week Los angeles Police Department trapped me and offered me cash as an undercover officer next to La Staples Center. Then they impounded my car, gave me a ticket. I e-mailed uber and they did not care.

Now I am looking what is the solution for it ?

They impounded my car under illegal taxicab code.

Did anyone get this situation before ( I hope not) or does anyone know anything about it what should I do ?

Thanks.
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
Hi people,

Last week Los angeles Police Department trapped me and offered me cash as an undercover officer next to La Staples Center. Then they impounded my car, gave me a ticket. I e-mailed uber and they did not care.

Now I am looking what is the solution for it ?

They impounded my car under illegal taxicab code.

Did anyone get this situation before ( I hope not) or does anyone know anything about it what should I do ?

Thanks.
Get even.

Confiscate one of their cars !
 

tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
Get even.

Confiscate one of their cars !
Take 5 lb. Maul, insert yellow handled "key". Should take 15 seconds . . .
(P.S., never buy a used car with this ignition system)
Bring 12 volt lantern battery to wire up to tail lights.
Screenshot_2016-04-18-04-22-45.png
 
Last edited:

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Last week Los angeles Police Department trapped me and offered me cash as an undercover officer next to La Staples Center. Then they impounded my car, gave me a ticket. I e-mailed uber and they did not care.

Uber tells you specifically do not accept street hails and do not accept cash. Uber tells you that you must accept passengers only from the Uber application. This is why Uber does "not care". In fact, I am surprised that Uber did not de-activate you on the spot. To read what CSRs and other Uber employees have posted here, accepting, or attempting to accept a street hail will earn you a no-questions-asked automatic de-activation.

Usually, when the Police impound your car, they give you a paper that tells you what to do to get it returned to you. Did they give you a paper? If not, as others have posted here, contact the Police and ask them what you are supposed to do. Whatever you do, get it back as soon as possible. Those storage charges are high and mount quickly.

I do hope that the car is driveable when you go to fetch it. More than one person who has had his car impounded has gone to retieve it and found that he could not drive it. The Police are none too careful with cars that they impound. It is worse if the Police have a private firm tow it. Impound jobs tend to pay well and the Police do not care what the private firm does. Your car will be banged and bumped around and may even have parts missing.

I have had more than a few friends, relatives and acquaintances who have had to deal with tow-aways and impoundments. In addition, I have hauled more than a few customers to impound yards. On occasion, I will offer to wait when we arrive, to make sure that they get back the car or that they can drive it. Some take me up on it, some do not. Mostly, I will not make the offer, though. Most of the impound trips involve annoying passengers. Most impound jobs do not tip or tip poorly. I understand why, they are in a foul mood and might need the money to get back their car. But, you do get that for which you pay. Most impound yards in this area are in rather remote locations where it is difficult to secure transportation. Arlington County (a Virginia suburb) is one exception, but even there you must leg it if the bus that goes by there is not the one that you want.
 

JimS

Well-Known Member
^^^
Yup, and one of the instances was at Staples.
Sounds like a hot spot for this kind of entrapment.
It's not entrapment if you're doing something illegal. It's a sting operation.

I'm not an Uber hater by any means. Yes, I don't like their rate cuts, and I can't stand their customer service & unethical behavior, but the job is fun and I make some extra coin doing it.

But I AM against people who jump into this gig without understanding rules, regulations, and costs. I was on this forum for at least a month before I took my first ride.

You can't accept street hails! All rides must be done through the App. Never accept cash unless the rider specifically gives you a tip at the end. If it's too much, make sure they're not stupidly paying you for the ride.

You broke the law, and there is no recourse but to pay the fines, get your car back, and try to make money the right way.

There is ONE other option - you could consult with an attorney who may be able to convince a judge that this was illegal entrapment, but I doubt you have a case.
 
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Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
"Entrapment" often walks a fine line.

Here, back when the streetwalkers were all over Fourteenth Street, the Metropolitan Police used to use what the Fourth Estate called "Flatfoot Floozies". These were female police officers disguised as streetwalkers. It got to the point where the Police commanders issued directives that these decoys could not dress too provocatively and could not even approach potential johns. The john had to approach them, mention a Close Encounter of the Best Kind and money, then they could make the arrest. When approached and spoken to, the decoys could not mention anything about "getting busy", money, "services" offered, anything. The john had to do all of the talking.

MPD also used decoy johns, so the real streetwalkers never would mention anything, either. They insisted that the john do all of the talking. It used to be quite the comedy watching the johns and girls negotiate. I used to make good money hauling the girls and johns to the trick pad, waiting and bringing them back to the start point.

Usually, the female decoy's male colleagues were waiting close at hand, and, upon signal, would approach and arrest. The decoy, though, did have her badge and service weapon in a clutch purse.


What happened was that several johns used the entrapment defence when the decoys talked to them, asked them a question such as "Are you looking for a date?" or were dressed provocatively. These johns got off, hence the directives.

In the case of transport-for-hire stings, however, the "entrapment" defence has been less successful. There is something in it about a "pre-disposition to violate the law" that is easy for the accuser (prosecutor) to prove and difficult for the respondent (defendant) to disprove (do not confuse this with "burden-shifting", that does not enter into it, here......and do not get me going on "burden-shifting"). I do not know the whole thing on
"pre-disposition", a lawyer should know more.

Here, the Hack Office and Police have used decoys on cabs and limousines. Limousines are not supposed to accept street hails, but used to do it quite a bit. It has toned down somewhat, as the word has gotten out that the Police and Hack Inspectors are pulling over limousines that do this, issuing summonses and impounding cars. Out of State cabs are not supposed to accept street hails at all, even those going to their jurisdiction of licensure (although they can transport passengers who summon them by telephone, application or previous arrangement back to their jurisdiction of licensure). The Police and Hack Inspectors have been going after this, as well.

In fact, these days, the Hack Office pursues multiple violations with their little traps. They will put a black person out there to hail a cab. Twenty five, or so, yards up the street, they will put a white person to hail a cab. If the D.C. cab driver passes the black person and picks up the white person, he receives a summons for refusal to haul and another one for discrimination in the provision of service. If he passes both, he receives one summons for refusal to haul. If an out of state cab stops for either or both, he receives a summons for illegal hacking and has his car impounded. If a limousine stops for either, it is the same. More than one driver caught in those traps has tried the entrapment defence and failed
 

observer

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Uber tells you specifically do not accept street hails and do not accept cash. Uber tells you that you must accept passengers only from the Uber application. This is why Uber does "not care". In fact, I am surprised that Uber did not de-activate you on the spot. To read what CSRs and other Uber employees have posted here, accepting, or attempting to accept a street hail will earn you a no-questions-asked automatic de-activation.

Usually, when the Police impound your car, they give you a paper that tells you what to do to get it returned to you. Did they give you a paper? If not, as others have posted here, contact the Police and ask them what you are supposed to do. Whatever you do, get it back as soon as possible. Those storage charges are high and mount quickly.

I do hope that the car is driveable when you go to fetch it. More than one person who has had his car impounded has gone to retieve it and found that he could not drive it. The Police are none too careful with cars that they impound. It is worse if the Police have a private firm tow it. Impound jobs tend to pay well and the Police do not care what the private firm does. Your car will be banged and bumped around and may even have parts missing.

I have had more than a few friends, relatives and acquaintances who have had to deal with tow-aways and impoundments. In addition, I have hauled more than a few customers to impound yards. On occasion, I will offer to wait when we arrive, to make sure that they get back the car or that they can drive it. Some take me up on it, some do not. Mostly, I will not make the offer, though. Most of the impound trips involve annoying passengers. Most impound jobs do not tip or tip poorly. I understand why, they are in a foul mood and might need the money to get back their car. But, you do get that for which you pay. Most impound yards in this area are in rather remote locations where it is difficult to secure transportation. Arlington County (a Virginia suburb) is one exception, but even there you must leg it if the bus that goes by there is not the one that you want.

In CA, police departments don't run the impound yards. I can think of only one, where the city actually has its own tow service. Most contract out the work to private tow companies.

In Los Angeles the towing is done by one of 18 Official Police Garages (OPGs). These are private tow companies authorized by the police department to tow cars for the police.

While sometimes cars are damaged by tow trucks or forklifts, this is very rare. Rarer still is having parts or belongings missing. Not saying it doesn't happen, but towing for the police is a very lucrative business, companies don't want to lose the business.

People who get their cars towed, are not happy campers. Some have been known to on occasion, lie.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Some have been known to on occasion, lie.

I am guessing that in California, if someone who has had his car towed complains and can back it, the Police or the Jurisdiction actually will do something.

Here, many of the Jurisdictions do operate their own impound yards but will use private firms to pick up the slack. In some cases, the private firms tow to the impound yards, in some cases, the private firms handle the whole thing: tow the car, keep the car, collect the money, release the car. The private firm will pay either a flat fee or a cut to the Jurisdiction for which they tow. Here, though, if your car is damaged, both the Jurisdiction and the private firm will tell you that it is too bad for you. Even the courts have upheld this, here. The attitude is that if you did not want your car towed or damaged, you should not have parked where you did.
 

observer

Well-Known Member
Moderator
I am guessing that in California, if someone who has had his car towed complains and can back it, the Police or the Jurisdiction actually will do something.

Here, many of the Jurisdictions do operate their own impound yards but will use private firms to pick up the slack. In some cases, the private firms tow to the impound yards, in some cases, the private firms handle the whole thing: tow the car, keep the car, collect the money, release the car. The private firm will pay either a flat fee or a cut to the Jurisdiction for which they tow. Here, though, if your car is damaged, both the Jurisdiction and the private firm will tell you that it is too bad for you. Even the courts have upheld this, here. The attitude is that if you did not want your car towed or damaged, you should not have parked where you did.

Generally, the impound yard is liable for damage, if you can prove damage was done while in custody of the yard. The difficulty is proving it.

A few years back I worked for a company that impounded a couple hundred cars a day for a major CA city. Majority of towing was done by tow companies we contracted with to just tow the car to us.

Impound fees were very high, about $350 for FIRST day (currently just under $500). A good chunk of which went to the city.

Cashiers were behind bullet proof glass because people would come in and curse the cashiers, they were very angry "customers". We got many complaints of damage to cars and belongings missing. We would evaluate the damage claimed, if it was valid we would deduct from the tow companies pay.

Some claims were valid, many were not.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
People would come in and curse the cashiers.

That is no surprise. The cashier is the face of the entity to whom the vehicle owner is paying the money, money that he does not want to pay, so he goes off on the available target. As you cited, the fees are steep, as a rule.

Do you recall the video that went nationwide of the female ESPN reporter who went off on a tow company cashier here? It was in Arlington, Virginia (a suburb). They tow viciously in Virginia, even to the point of breaking the law, but rarely does anyone do anything about it. I know the tow company that took her car, and, in her defence, they are a bunch of [rectal apertures] who have been popped for illegal towing and for towing cars that were not parked illegally. To be sure, I do not know if she had parked illegally. The point is, though, her conduct is not unusual. I have seen similar and worse, more than once.


I guess that it is time, once more, to cue up Steve Goodman's Lincoln Park Pirates.
 

Fireguy50

Well-Known Member
You did something stupid in a posted "No Stupid Zone"

Get your car out fast, before they fines add up, and follow the Uber app!
 
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