Did anyone have to transport a severely handicapped rider?

Young Kim

Well-Known Member
I just had a memorable ride. I drove to a house for a pickup in the suburbs. Once there, I saw the garage door open, and there was a lady at the back of the garage by the door in a wheelchair. She called out that she needed help so I went to her and pushed her down the driveway to my car. I opened the door and she told me she had cerebral palsy and would need help. I gave her my hand but she said she really could not move her body well. So she said she would need to put her arms around my neck and that I would have to carry her. I was fine with this but since she was around the same body weight as mine, it took some time. The only issue I had was that as I positioned her in my back seat, she sort of fell sideways and slightly hit her head on the opposite door (not hard) before I could put her seat belt on. I put the wheelchair in as best I could... I drove her to church which was four blocks away. I wheeled her into the church and sat her down and positioned her carefully as Mass was starting. She had no complaints and was happy but I was afraid she could have been injured while I was placing her into my car. Has anyone been in a similar situation?
 

Young Kim

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
Does Mentally Handicapped count?
Well, I never had a mentally handicapped rider but many of the late night drunk passengers certainly seemed that way. Especially when I started driving years ago when Uber did not require a destination (at least in Chicago). Many years ago, drunk passengers would come out and not even know where they were going, so I would ask for their driver's license or have them call someone on their phone so I could figure out where to take them since some were slurring their speech so hard and I could not understand a word. Not legally "mentally @@@@@@ed", but really drunk people had a lot of challenges.
 

UbaBrah

Well-Known Member
I had one woman with groceries who was in a wheelchair. I tend to be wary about potential medical issues since I'm not trained for that beyond basic first aid, and I also don't want to run into a liability situation.

But she lucked out with me as I'm not a dick and drive an SUV. So I loaded her stuff into the car, then helped her in and out, and also lifted and folded her chair into the back. It was big and heavy, and only just about fit. At the destination I wheeled her up her ramp to the front door. Nice lady, who had led an interesting life. $10 tip.
 

SleelWheels

Well-Known Member
I picked up a guy from a nursing home, had a wheelchair and his elderly wife was with him. Dude had a catheter and a pretty damn full urine bag. We had a long trip in front of us to get to his doc at the VA hospital and I thought the bag would pop before we’d get there. Anyway, I think a lot of medical facilities or patients themselves use rideshare for medical transport when we’re not equipped to do so. Nice of you to take care of the lady though.
 

Uberguyken

Member
ADA law allows for us to decline a ride to someone who cannot reasonably use our service. We are not medical transport... I am not trained in medical transport and in this case would have refused service based on the non-discrimination portion of the ADA law. I would have forwarded this directly to Uber explaining why I cancelled stating the passenger could not enter my vehicle under their own power and I am not a medical transport. Here's the Law...
It clearly says if the individual is CAPABLE of using the service ...this passenger was not without medical assistance which I am not trained to provide.



Screenshot_20200628-172655.jpg
 

kcdrvr15

Well-Known Member
You all are being pimped out so bad. All of these people are eligible for and getting a gov check along with free health care, they have transportation services that do just this, and is paid for by insurance. The reason they are requesting uber/lyft is they are cheap f**ks and don't care if you get hurt and will sue you if they do. I don't do these types of jobs, even at taxi rates they are too much trouble and high risk.
Here in KC, they have a company that is paid for with grants from both the local and fed goverments, the drivers make $22 an hour w/benefits. It's called Assisted Transportation, they specialize in transporting non-ambulatory paitents and handicap people to where they need to go.
 

SinTaxERROR

Well-Known Member
I just had a memorable ride. I drove to a house for a pickup in the suburbs. Once there, I saw the garage door open, and there was a lady at the back of the garage by the door in a wheelchair. She called out that she needed help so I went to her and pushed her down the driveway to my car. I opened the door and she told me she had cerebral palsy and would need help. I gave her my hand but she said she really could not move her body well. So she said she would need to put her arms around my neck and that I would have to carry her. I was fine with this but since she was around the same body weight as mine, it took some time. The only issue I had was that as I positioned her in my back seat, she sort of fell sideways and slightly hit her head on the opposite door (not hard) before I could put her seat belt on. I put the wheelchair in as best I could... I drove her to church which was four blocks away. I wheeled her into the church and sat her down and positioned her carefully as Mass was starting. She had no complaints and was happy but I was afraid she could have been injured while I was placing her into my car. Has anyone been in a similar situation?
4 blocks?

You could have just wheeled her there to church and walked back to your car. Just leave the app on, collecting wait time, then drove to the church, ending the ride.

All you are doing is opening yourself to liability. And be assured Uber nor Lyft will have your back should this ride have gone sideways in any manner.
 

mbd

Well-Known Member
I just had a memorable ride. I drove to a house for a pickup in the suburbs. Once there, I saw the garage door open, and there was a lady at the back of the garage by the door in a wheelchair. She called out that she needed help so I went to her and pushed her down the driveway to my car. I opened the door and she told me she had cerebral palsy and would need help. I gave her my hand but she said she really could not move her body well. So she said she would need to put her arms around my neck and that I would have to carry her. I was fine with this but since she was around the same body weight as mine, it took some time. The only issue I had was that as I positioned her in my back seat, she sort of fell sideways and slightly hit her head on the opposite door (not hard) before I could put her seat belt on. I put the wheelchair in as best I could... I drove her to church which was four blocks away. I wheeled her into the church and sat her down and positioned her carefully as Mass was starting. She had no complaints and was happy but I was afraid she could have been injured while I was placing her into my car. Has anyone been in a similar situation?
Had a 20ish year old patient going to Davita dialysis, her first time. Rolled her in and said good bye. Did not know it was a dialysis issue until the building popped up:unsure:. It was one of those “ make sure to follow the Exact GPS route, fixed cost ride”. I didn’t take the exact route and still got paid. Took the faster and better route.:thumbdown: DVA stock is doing good and Oracle of Omaha owns some of it.👍
 

Young Kim

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
4 blocks?

You could have just wheeled her there to church and walked back to your car. Just leave the app on, collecting wait time, then drove to the church, ending the ride.

All you are doing is opening yourself to liability. And be assured Uber nor Lyft will have your back should this ride have gone sideways in any manner.
Looking back, wheeling her to church would have been faster maybe, but I did not know how close her destination was until she was in the car and I started the ride in the app. (For myself, I start rides once the passenger is inside.) Plus, she clearly wanted me to drive her to church, otherwise I feel she would be suggested my pushing her there. I was a little surprised nobody was actually at the church to receive her though. So I slowly and carefully brought her out of the car, took out her wheelchair, and then took her into the church.
 

Daisey77

Well-Known Member
I got a request one night at bar close. Get a call a short time later telling me he ordered it for a friend and there's no way I can miss him because he's in a wheelchair. After he assured me over and over that he's able to get in the car on his own, I pull up to the intersection and the guy is nowhere to be found. I'm waiting out my 5 minutes and with less than a minute left two people come running up to the car, asking me if I'm the Uber. They toss his wallet and phone in my truck and say hold on we're going to go get him. I said, get him? Get him from where? Are you guys coming with him? They said oh no we don't know him. We just came across him sitting in the middle of an intersection throwing up on himself. We found his wallet and phone in the middle of the street. The guy offered to help get him in the car but told him that's only one hurdle. When I get to where he's going what if there's no one there to help me get him out? Not to mention he's not getting in my truck with throw up all over him. he didn't even know his own name! Call the account holder and found out they were part of rugby team for the disabled and the whole team was staying at a hotel about 20 miles away. They came downtown drinking and the account holder had met a woman who he decided to go home with and left his buddy to fend for himself, handicap in a wheelchair, in a city he's never been, and drinking at altitude he's not used to. I told him I hope the tail he was chasing was worth it because his buddy is going to the hospital. I hung up and called the paramedics. I apologized to them but said I don't know what to do with him. With me being 125 lbs there is no way I can lift a grown ass man up into my truck . meanwhile I called Uber, before ending the ride, tell them what happened, and had them quickly speak with the paramedic to confirm my story because I was damned if they were going to come back with some bullshit accusing me of refusing service to a disabled person or something
 

Jon Stoppable

Well-Known Member
Bear would help them. Bear is much larger than most humans so lifting is not a problem if they don't mind bear using his mouth on the back of their clothes. If something goes wrong, bear would not get sued. Bear would just eat them to dispose of the evidence.
 

Young Kim

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
I picked up a guy from a nursing home, had a wheelchair and his elderly wife was with him. Dude had a catheter and a pretty damn full urine bag. We had a long trip in front of us to get to his doc at the VA hospital and I thought the bag would pop before we’d get there. Anyway, I think a lot of medical facilities or patients themselves use rideshare for medical transport when we’re not equipped to do so. Nice of you to take care of the lady though.
You just reminded me of another hospital trip where a father and son came in who were totally blind. They had these two very large service dogs with them, and one of the service dogs was extremely friendly and I was a little distracted. Yeah, come to think of it, there have been other disabled passengers for me...

LOL, I remember driving a very elderly couple from the hospital to their home, and both were extremely hard of hearing. As the wife was chatting with me, the husband told her, "Don't bother the nice young man, he drives very carefully and safely, as all "Japs" do." I was a bit surprised as the term is a derogatory reference to Asians, but after speaking to both of them for a few minutes in a friendly talk, I was convinced that he was just from a different time like 60 to 70 years ago. Both had accents and said they lived in Europe before coming to the U.S.
 

ANT 7

Well-Known Member
Our city provides deeply subsidized wheelchair van rides for these folks.

You'll never get one in an Uber here.
 

SinTaxERROR

Well-Known Member
Bear would help them. Bear is much larger than most humans so lifting is not a problem if they don't mind bear using his mouth on the back of their clothes. If something goes wrong, bear would not get sued. Bear would just eat them to dispose of the evidence.
The fact that you are a human pretending to be a bear that eats humans is very disturbing to me... of course I will make an exception for lowly pax that deserve to be cannibalized... :roflmao:
 

Demon

Well-Known Member
ADA law allows for us to decline a ride to someone who cannot reasonably use our service. We are not medical transport... I am not trained in medical transport and in this case would have refused service based on the non-discrimination portion of the ADA law. I would have forwarded this directly to Uber explaining why I cancelled stating the passenger could not enter my vehicle under their own power and I am not a medical transport. Here's the Law...
It clearly says if the individual is CAPABLE of using the service ...this passenger was not without medical assistance which I am not trained to provide.



View attachment 479764
Lyft just settled a case like this. Drivers need to take people in wheelchairs. The person was not capable of sitting in your car?
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Uberguyken

Member
Lyft just settled a case like this. Drivers need to take people in wheelchairs. The person was not capable of sitting in your car?
Post automatically merged:

No dipshyt he could not get into my car without my assistance of lifting him or her.... And I am NOT a medical transport.

Good thing I don't do LYFT anymore huh?
 

Demon

Well-Known Member
No dipshyt he could not get into my car without my assistance of lifting him or her.... And I am NOT a medical transport.

Good thing I don't do LYFT anymore huh?
So he was capable of using the service. Uber has settlements about wheelchairs too.
 
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