• UberPeople.NET - Independent community of rideshare drivers. It's FREE to be a person and enjoy all the benefits of membership. JOIN US! CLICK HERE

Dear Television News Reporters,

Spreading misinformation is not helping (Rider safety.)


UberPax.jpeg


This morning as I was getting ready for work, I was watching my local news broadcast in Seattle Washington, Local Q13 News. I'm very fond of this news affiliate and watch it daily. Their local reporters are likable, intelligent, and very good at their jobs. This is why I was shocked to hear one of the most talented members of their team, Ms. Brandi Kruse, speak in error when referring to the proper procedures for Uber drivers in confirming a rider's (Pax) name.


BrandiKruse.PNG

Brandi Kruse:
https://q13fox.com/author/bkruse9/

She was doing a story about the recent string of events where female pax are getting raped and even murdered by fraudulent rideshare drivers. After reporting the story, Ms. Kruse then began running through a list of tips riders need to use in order to guarantee their safety.

Of course she went through the usual preliminary steps: Check the car license plate, the make, model, color... then confirm the driver's face to the picture and the driver's name as well. All was fine up until her next few sentences.

"Make sure you get the driver to tell you your name! Do not give your name to the driver. Make them say your name. They have it in their app.They better know your name!"

:eek::eek: I almost spit out my coffee! "Oh what the hell did she just say?? This is why I had two pax just yesterday pull this crap on me!" Coffee down and laptop open.....Lissetti has some words to say to this reporter.

This is the email I sent off to her this morning April 5th, 2019 9:55 AM. I'm waiting on a response. Q13 News is usually good about replying back to their community. I'll keep you guys posted as to the status of the reply.



Attention: Brandi Kruse


Hello Ms. Kruse,

I am a female Uber driver and I have performed this job for over 2 years while I attended college. I'm writing to you about a statement you said in your morning broadcast about the fake Uber driver rape story. You said that the Uber driver is the one who is supposed to say the rider's name. This is incorrect and Uber has warned us drivers against using this practice. We are supposed to ask the rider's name, not say it. The reason is because random people can approach a waiting car and essentially "steal" a paying customer's Uber ride by and saying they are indeed the name of the person the driver asked for. Then once that person is in the car and the ride is underway, the rider will attempt to continue the fraud by saying they put the wrong address in the app and they will just give directions to where they want to go.

The experienced Uber drivers will realize something is up and pull over immediately. The problem now is that we have a stranger in our car who is not identified Uber's system by either their account ID or by info extracted through their phone data. Uber has no way of tracking this person should anything transpire. This happened to me once as a rookie Uber driver when I pulled up to The Shelter bar in Ballard one Saturday morning at 2:20 am. A man walked up my car and asked who I was looking for. I told him the name of the rider I was looking for, "Jake." The man said that was him and got in the car. About a mile away my phone rang. It was my real rider I was supposed to pick up, the real Jake.

Jake canceled the ride and I pulled over to tell the man sitting behind me that he got in the wrong Uber. He angrily told me it didn't matter and that he just lived a couple miles away and to take him home and he will give me cash. That is against Uber's policy too and I told him that. He refused to get out of the car. Like I said I am a female driver and this was a large, angry drunk man. Further, we were both alone in my car on a dark street at 2:30 am. So as to not escalate matters, I did as I was told and took him to his destination. As he got out he tossed a $20.00 bill on my console.

Yes I made $20.00 out of a bad situation but this could have ended much worse for me. This man was not Jake. He does not exist in Uber's system. There would be no way for Uber to track this man had he attacked me and fled after. I had got into a car accident with this individual in the vehicle, Uber's insurance would not cover any damages including the rider's medical injuries because since the rider in my car was not their customer, I was working "off app" in a street hail fashion which is not only against Uber policy, but it's against the law for rideshare drivers to do. Street hail is legal for taxi cabs only.

Please do not tell your listeners that the driver should say the rider's name. We are only to ask their name, or the rider can confirm our name. Unlike Lyft, we Uber driver's have no picture or other way identify a rider on the app other than their name and location. Meanwhile Uber gives the rider more than enough information to identify their driver. Riders are given the driver's car make, model, color and most importantly the car's license plate number. Rider's are also given the driver's name, picture, as well. The burden of proof is upon the rider to clarify that they are getting into the right car. Further, Uber makes sure they supply the rider all the tools they need to ensure they are getting into the proper vehicle.

I also work as a moderator for the world's largest online rideshare forum, uberpeople.net. You are welcome to come to our forum anytime and see what we drivers are saying about this recent turn of events and other issues. I've supplied some links to some threads on our forum regarding this topic that may be of interest to you. You aren't the only reporter who is telling the public to make the driver say the rider's name. This has gone nationwide.

https://uberpeople.net/threads/uber-riders-refusing-to-give-their-name.319349/

https://uberpeople.net/threads/national-whats-my-name-campaign.319282/

Also, from Uber.com.

https://help.uber.com/partners/article/the-wrong-rider-took-this-trip------?nodeId=7a3db1b8-1521-452c-bfa4-8474f119c26f


I watch the Q13 news broadcast daily, and I think you are an excellent reporter and very talented. I look forward to your in depth commentaries on local and national issues. However please do not continue to spread this misinformation about rider name confirmation tactics. We Uber drivers are also part of your community that you seek to protect. Why put information out there that not only is against Uber guidelines, but also jeopardizes our safety as well?


Thank you,
 
Lissetti

Lissetti

Rebel Honey Badger
Article Manager
Moderator
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #42
Dang man too bad about the no reply but yea they are going to be real careful about what they say now that they know we have a communicator like yourself on our side.
We did link this article to her Facebook and Twitter so she is aware of it and now knows I did much more than reach out to her in a private email. Everyone can see her mistake.
 

Taxi2Uber

Well-Known Member
It's official. Riders asking drivers for the rider's name is now the new normal.
Email that I, (and I assume all riders/drivers), received from Uber yesterday:
Steps to help ensure safe pickups
1. Confirming the rider’s name
Riders are asked to find you by checking that your license plate, make and model of your car, and the photo of you match what is shown in their Rider app. Some customers may also want to confirm their ride by asking you:
  • "Who are you here to pick up?"
  • "What is my name?"

2. Having the rider confirm your name
You should feel free to ask riders to confirm your name, too. Here are some helpful ways to do that:
  • “Hi, who is your driver?”
  • “Can you please confirm my name? It should be displayed in your app.”
So all the news reports "teaching" riders what to do are now vindicated.
I think its backwards and problematic, and I have had several issues already.
 

Alantc

Active Member
Since the tragic incident in SC more riders are checking my plates,or they ask me who are you here for, or ask what my name is before they get in the car.I would never get in the car or drive someone until names are verified.
Post automatically merged:

I agree with the advice that the driver should call the name. That is how the pax knows the rider is not some random guy, additional security. The argument if some one trying to steal a ride is not good. Nobody steals a ride and no driver drives the passangeres to so new destination without making them change it in the app.

Also, if the driver is so concerned with safety or that some one might steal a ride, the driver can ask the pax to tell the driver the driver's name - the pax should know the driver's name.

Also, that is exactly how some victims get into the wrong car. Hey, are you here to pick up Liz, she asked. Yes, get in, he said. Then he raped her. True story!
Exactly, 2 simple questions (1) rider asks who are you here to pickup (2) driver asks rider for name after giving his name. If the driver ask first ,rider gives name but doesn't ask driver names, forgetful thought on riders part, hops in,end of story.And i always ask the rider if this is the adress there going too
 
Last edited:

Spike72

Active Member
Good point. No one gets into my vehicle without my verifying who they are. As a female driver, maybe I'm more conditioned to be aware of my personal safety. The pax can easily verify me via my photo and vehicle. But Lyft has too many pax accounts with NO PAX PHOTOS which is very unsafe because we cannot easily verify the pax then except by name. Cannot count the times the pax account is NOT the person trying to get into the car. The pax account holder has set up the ride for a friend, boyfriend, adult son or daughter, girlfriend, etc. The pax is supposed to tell the driver who THEY ARE and if they are not the account holder tell us the account holder's name. Sometimes, the pax account holder will call and tell the driver the name of the person they are picking up. If that's required, it's not enforced. Of course not. If news anchors did the job, they would understand the job. But they don't - and they don't.
Post automatically merged:




Yes, my favorite local news line after the death of the South Carolina college student was, "The parents of the murdered woman are working with Lyft and Uber to make ride share safer." Yes, of course. It must be the fault of the compnay. Because this young female was too stupid, drunk, or complacent - pick one - to follow simple instructions and now she's dead at the hands of a predator, just one of hundreds of thousands roaming the country looking for ways to do evil and exploiting every avenue until they do evil. I don't mean to be cruel with my statement, but honestly, the technology makes it so easy to just drop the common sense and make everyone else responsible for us, doesn't it?
Post automatically merged:




Here in the U.S. where individual freedom no longer goes hand-in-hand with individual responsibility, no one is ever to blame for their own actions, mistakes, decisions, choices, or lives. So much easier to be a victim you're entire life and wallow in self-righteous indignation.
Yeah, why are the parents of the murdered woman working with Lyft and Uber to make ride share safer? Neither Uber nor Lyft are responsible for this. She may have thought she was getting in an Uber car, but the son of a @@@@@ that murdered her wasn't an Uber driver. He was some random sicko that was posing as one. This is just another example of legislators picking low-hanging fruit to solve what is ostensibly not even ride share's issue. Yes it is tragic, but the fault is not with people doing their due diligence (drivers and aware riders).
 

RadarRider

Active Member
I am launching a hashtag campaign to combat this ridiculous "say my name" campaign: #spymyplate
Why? To what end? Rideshare drivers are more at risk than passengers. If it makes them more aware, is free advertising, and possibly even makes people more appreciative of real drivers... then why? Pick and choose your battles and don't go chasing windmills or barn burning. If you want to protest something... protest Uber STEALING our earnings from Destination mode rides!
 

Spike72

Active Member
Why? To what end? Rideshare drivers are more at risk than passengers. If it makes them more aware, is free advertising, and possibly even makes people more appreciative of real drivers... then why? Pick and choose your battles and don't go chasing windmills or barn burning. If you want to protest something... protest Uber STEALING our earnings from Destination mode rides!
Por que no los dos?

I see this all over the internet. Wherein I can't possibly be in opposition to more than one thing at a time. I can (maybe you can't).

I am opposed to Lyft and Uber gouging our fares - but that's not what I'm talking about here.

I'm talking about what was expressed in the original post which @Lissetti covered very nicely. Riders shouldn't be asking us to say their names. If they are truly interested in security they would be looking at our license plate numbers instead of telling us to say their (not unique) name in a tree-marking fashion.
 

RadarRider

Active Member
Riders shouldn't be asking us to say their names. If they are truly interested in security they would be looking at our license plate numbers instead of telling us to say their (not unique) name in a tree-marking fashion.
I agree with checking the make and model (at the very least) and looking at the plates!!! People apologize, but I will never be offended.

Saying their name is not the highest form of security... however, it does somewhat show that you are the correct driver as well. (Assuming no one stole the car and the phone.)

It also adds a level of personal comfort. Why not do it?

However, They should say OUR names... so we know it is the correct rider. (Hopefully not an unwanted aggressor)

I almost always say their names to let them know I am the right driver and it is a nice icebreaker. (A two way handshake.)

At the airport, I will get out of the car and yell out their names if I have to, to speed things up... (it is frigging annoying, but good practice for public speaking.)

Then the only way they get in the car is if they tell me my name first. (When in doubt anyway.)
(The airport would be crowded with plenty of people to witness any violent pushback.)

As I expect them to say my name, I reciprocate with theirs.
It becomes a sort of etiquette and pleasantry that gets the ride off to a nice start.
No bowing or courtesy required.
It costs nothing.
A little sincerity and smile does not hurt either.
 

UberVato

Well-Known Member
I’m sorry...
I felt compelled to contribute to this thread with honesty...

Here, in the Bay Area, the same “say my name” campaigned was preached by a much less attractive anchor, and therefore I tried to make a thread about it.

Now, when it comes to ms Brandi, she is extremely good looking, pretty, and likeable, obviously knows how to take a selfie...and therefore, in my world, her word becomes law.

If she said “hey ant, why don’t you just drive off a cliff ?!” Off I go..

So thank you Liz, for actually writing about it, I can’t stand people who do not have common sense to do the right thing, and I can’t stand people who cannot function because members of the opposite sex are too damn good looking....

Oh wait...
 

Lissetti

Rebel Honey Badger
Article Manager
Moderator
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #54
Now, when it comes to ms Brandi, she is extremely good looking, pretty, and likeable, obviously knows how to take a selfie...and therefore, in my world, her word becomes law.
Yeah that's one thing I'll give Q13 News in Seattle WA credit for. They have very good looking reporters.

Screenshot_20190417-163718~2.jpg
 

JBinPenfield

Active Member
I've never asked for the passenger's name because I thought it was foolish from a customer service standpoint to say something like "please confirm your name." I'd much rather say, with a smile on my face, "Hi _______?" followed with (where appropriate) "can I help you get your groceries/luggage in my trunk?" Their name also helps when driving up to the pickup point because it will usually tell you what sex they are and often gives clues as to race and nationality so which person you are looking for. I agree with a previous poster that the next thing the pax should say is "can you confirm your name" or if they don't do that I can ask "can you confirm my name on your app...." if there is any doubt I've it's the wrong person. In over 3000 rides I've yet to pick up a wrong pax, even without them confirming my name.
 

Alantc

Active Member
I am launching a hashtag campaign to combat this ridiculous "say my name" campaign: #spymyplate
The one other thing i do is always ask when i start the trip, is this the adress your going to. In my early days of driving i did pickup a couple of Times people with the same name. And picking up in a collage town you pick up a lot of students with the same name.
 

Mr. Yuck

Well-Known Member
My first name is unusual but the pax knew it and I knew hers and she passed out in the back and 15 minutes later the ride cancels and I stop and the wrong Allison wakes up drunk on the side of a dark dirt road in a national forest and I'd donned my luminous kabuki mask. Well no, not the mask part but she reacted that way.

Check the plate!
 

IMMA DRIVER

Well-Known Member
Here's my humble suggestion: The app could solve everything. Make the app a 2-way street. When driver's arrive and confirm they have the correct passenger that is when they swipe right and begin the trip. Well the passenger's should have a swipe right button also, that says "CONFIRMED DRIVER". This way the owness is on both parties involved. Passenger is confirming they have the correct car, license and driver.
Most arguments are either for the driver, or for the rider. Why doesn't Uber and Lyft just make the app a 2-way street and the ride will not start navigating until both parties have confirmation.

If a problem arises, the question will now become why did rider swipe right if they didn't confirm the driver? Not many would want to look stupid and swipe without confimation.
 

RadarRider

Active Member
Here's my humble suggestion: The app could solve everything. Make the app a 2-way street. When driver's arrive and confirm they have the correct passenger that is when they swipe right and begin the trip. Well the passenger's should have a swipe right button also, that says "CONFIRMED DRIVER". This way the owness is on both parties involved. Passenger is confirming they have the correct car, license and driver.
Most arguments are either for the driver, or for the rider. Why doesn't Uber and Lyft just make the app a 2-way street and the ride will not start navigating until both parties have confirmation.

If a problem arises, the question will now become why did rider swipe right if they didn't confirm the driver? Not many would want to look stupid and swipe without confimation.
Post automatically merged:

That might actually work... unless the passenger is not the one who paid for the ride.
 
Top