DC Taxi Rule Overhaul Could Cut Some Regulations in Age of Uber, Lyft

Another Uber Driver

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DC taxi rule overhaul could cut some regulations in age of Uber, Lyft

Max Smith | @amaxsmith
January 17, 2020, 7:05 PM
A major rewrite of D.C. taxi rules in the next few months will include changes meant to move toward a more level playing field between cabs and app-based ride-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft.
Though their rapid growth has slowed in D.C., Uber, Lyft, Via and similar services carry nearly 60 million trips per year. Taxi trips have fallen sharply over the last five years to 8.8 million trips in the 12 months that ended Sept. 30.
On a financial basis, with an average cab fare under $14, that means cabs collected around $112 million in fares, while ride-hailing apps collected around $657 million in fares for trips in D.C., the Department of For-Hire Vehicles said.

“The current regulations are too restrictive and forces D.C. taxicab operators into a singular process with [a] distinctly separate set of rules that diminishes their ability to expand services and be competitive,” Yellow Cab General Manager Roy Spooner told the D.C. Council this week.
The Department of For-Hire Vehicles will be amending some of the regulations cab companies have concerns with in the next five months, said Director David Do.
“Private vehicles for hire have plateaued over the last year, and so we expect that the industry is at this equilibrium at this point,” Do said.
The regulation changes set for public comment in coming months would take the taxi rules from about 400 pages to about 200 pages, and would lift requirements that cabdrivers get medical physicals, meet dress codes and get rid of cars that are over eight years old.
The new rules would allow cars up to 10 model-years old, matching the current rules for the app-based services known in the industry as transportation network companies, or TNCs.

“There are 112 areas where we can enforce on taxis, but only about 12 areas where we can enforce on TNCs,” Do said.
Still, Spooner described some things in the regulations, such as licensing and inspection requirements, as an advantage for taxis to promote, compared to the more self-governed world of Uber and Lyft.
Recalls
The department learned this week that about 15% of the cab fleet has been covered by some type of manufacturer’s recall.
“We depend on our independent drivers and our companies to get those recall fixes,” Do said.
The department has no idea though what that number is for Uber and Lyft drivers, since D.C. law does not require similar registrations and tracking for those companies.
Tracking and repairs are left to the companies and their drivers.
Complaints
The number of complaints filed with the city has risen, as it has become easier to reach out online and through social media.
The single biggest complaint the last two years was about drivers stopping in the middle of the road and blocking traffic or bike lanes while dropping off or picking up riders.

Alternative ride services
The Transport DC program is now within budget, so there are no plans to reinstate extra restrictions on trips that had been needed in the past.
Transport DC is a service that provides rides to WMATA MetroAccess customers.
A microtransit program that creates shared rides in designated parts of the city is also getting some increasing use, with more than 25,000 trips taken between June and December.
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It is PAST time for this. The City Council and DFHV/Taxicab Commission should have gotten rid of most of these rules in 2012.
 

SOLA-RAH

Well-Known Member
I fail to see how eliminating medical physicals, relaxing the dress code (lolol!?!), or allowing older vehicles is gonna help a DC cabbie make any more money than they are currently. Uber/Lyft are doing 11x more volume than taxicabs, 6x the revenue, and the gap is still growing. If taxicabs want to remain “competitive”, the regulations should be more stringent not less.

Also, some impressive volume numbers in the story within the story:
A19AD08F-DD00-4E48-9E50-53371D61956F.jpeg
 

Another Uber Driver

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It reduces the expenses.

The relaxed dress code really does not mean much. Most of the prohibitions are honoured more in their breach than their keeping as it is.

Giving us an extra two years does give us more time to save to buy another vehicle.

The elimination of the physical will give us a few dollars. It will knock a few dollars off what we must spend to renew or obtain a licence.

Clearly the items mentioned would not be sufficient to allow us to adjust our rates to compete with the TNCs on the longer trips. As it is, the short and mediocre trips in the city are about the same as the TNCx. While more people are discovering this, still too few people know it. If we had fewer expenses, we could be more flexible in our fares.

This is a step in the right direction, but, more needs to be done.

More regulations will not help us. It costs money to comply with regulations. The one regulation that should be retained is the licencing. The test for licencing should require knowledge of basic geography. This does allow us to sell our service as a cut above the TNCs. Other than that, more regulation only hurts us.

Here is a curious little bit of information:

The policy that either Uber of Lyft provides to you during Periods Two and Three is better than ours. We can buy only state minimums. Some of us have been crying for years for at least an option to purchase higher limits. It is only recently that some of the cab insurance companies began to offer collision/full coverage.
 

UberPotomac

Well-Known Member
It reduces the expenses.

The relaxed dress code really does not mean much. Most of the prohibitions are honoured more in their breach than their keeping as it is.

Giving us an extra two years does give us more time to save to buy another vehicle.

The elimination of the physical will give us a few dollars. It will knock a few dollars off what we must spend to renew or obtain a licence.

Clearly the items mentioned would not be sufficient to allow us to adjust our rates to compete with the TNCs on the longer trips. As it is, the short and mediocre trips in the city are about the same as the TNCx. While more people are discovering this, still too few people know it. If we had fewer expenses, we could be more flexible in our fares.

This is a step in the right direction, but, more needs to be done.

More regulations will not help us. It costs money to comply with regulations. The one regulation that should be retained is the licencing. The test for licencing should require knowledge of basic geography. This does allow us to sell our service as a cut above the TNCs. Other than that, more regulation only hurts us.

Here is a curious little bit of information:

The policy that either Uber of Lyft provides to you during Periods Two and Three is better than ours. We can buy only state minimums. Some of us have been crying for years for at least an option to purchase higher limits. It is only recently that some of the cab insurance companies began to offer collision/full coverage.
Is anyone that fill the requirement freely gets a DC cab license , today?
 

Darrell Green Fan

Well-Known Member
I think it's pretty obvious that the playing field is not level and cabs are subject to many more laws that put a cost on compliance. But I really don't have a lot of sympathy for the cab industry. Rider after rider have complained about their crappy service, dirty old cabs, rude drivers and the length of time they take to get to the rider (if they even show up at all). We prove better service at a lower cost, we deserve the business the cab companies are losing.
 

New2This

Well-Known Member
I think it's pretty obvious that the playing field is not level and cabs are subject to many more laws that put a cost on compliance. But I really don't have a lot of sympathy for the cab industry. Rider after rider have complained about their crappy service, dirty old cabs, rude drivers and the length of time they take to get to the rider (if they even show up at all). We prove better service at a lower cost, we deserve the business the cab companies are losing.
You can say the same thing and more about Uber/Lyft. You seen some of the pieces of shit sporting the Uber/Lyft stickers?

I get the "oh wow you speak English" more frequently these days. Welcome to the world of driving for $0.81/mile $0.60/mile
 

Another Uber Driver

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Is anyone that fill the requirement freely gets a DC cab license , today?
If you will meet the requirements, you can get a hack face.

I really don't have a lot of sympathy for the cab industry.
When you consider the source, ask me why I am not surprised at this statement.


Rider after rider have complained about their crappy service, dirty old cabs, rude drivers and the length of time they take to get to the rider
Those complaints are:

A. Old/Dated
B. TNC propaganda
C. Perpetuated by the TNCs, their shills, their trolls and those who have drunk the TNC kool-aid.
D. The same ones that I have been hearing from my customers, both cab and TNC, about Uber/Lyft drivers for some time......plus a few.

We prove better service
To hear what my customers are telling me; not any more you do not.



at a lower cost,
.............not any more, at least not for the short and mediocre trips. More and more people are discovering this. On the longer trips, once the surge hits 1,7, it is about the same as a cab. When it hits 1,9, you are paying more than a cab. Only on the longer trips is there a significant price differential. Keep in mind, what Uber pays to you is not the same as what the customer pays to Uber. In many cases, what Uber pays to you is far less than what the customer pays. I understand that you consider this irrelevant, as you are one of the minority of posters here who believes that what Uber pays to the drivers is sufficient.


we deserve the business the cab companies are losing.

When you consider that the level of service that you provide is far below that which I provide, that statement is obviously false. In fact, when I drive the Uber/Lyft car, I must "dumb down" the service that I provide.



You can say the same thing and more about Uber/Lyft. You seen some of the pieces of shit sporting the Uber/Lyft stickers?
His statements are pure TNC elitism that spring from drinking Uber's Kool-Aid.
 

UberPotomac

Well-Known Member
I am “ non speak English driver” andI hear complaint about cabbies . But let’s be fate , many cabbies are now UBER DRIVERS .
 

Another Uber Driver

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I thought you just had a hard time writing it.
Have you thought about taking classes?
Yes, I thought about classes and then I thought again not to .

If he posts in Spanish, I can decipher it; or most of it. I might have a hard time with words peculiar to one place or another.

It is similar to speakers of français métropolitaine who do not know what chaoui, steamé, ouaouaron or plaquemine is.
 

UberPotomac

Well-Known Member
If he posts in Spanish, I can decipher it; or most of it. I might have a hard time with words peculiar to one place or another.

It is similar to speakers of français métropolitaine who do not know what chaoui, steamé, ouaouaron or plaquemine is.
Oui , oui . Me Appel Uber Potomac . Je me an Uber driver partirme , the outer time labore plantation .Je ne parle fluent francais
 

Carnivore Deluxe

Well-Known Member
Bad. Exceptionally bad French. Malicious and insidious butchering of the Royal Language.

Paging our grammar policeman and distinguished scholar, AUD.
 
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