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Cleaning Fee - Required Steps

Discussion in 'Advice' started by KeJorn, Oct 27, 2014.

  1. KeJorn

    KeJorn Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Mars
    Driving:
    UberX
    Just in case someone vomits in your vehicle, etc, know the following (good luck finding anything like this on any of their websites or FAQs):

    "For a cleaning fee reimbursement, we require:

    1. A brief description of the incident
    2. A photo(s) of the damage
    3. A photo of the receipt of cleaning costs (cleaning fee MUST be appropriate to the damage)
    Note, when a rider makes a mess inside your vehicle, it is understandable that the vehicle interior would require some tidying up. However, if the amount requested does not seem appropriate given the evidence you provide of the incident, your cleaning fee reimbursement request will not be approved. Once received, we'll follow up with the rider and reimburse you as appropriate. Cleaning fee reimbursement requests must be made within 1 week of the incident, or will not be approved."
    - Uber Partner Support


    The only related information I have found on Uber's current websites are:
    "In the event of soiling in a drivers car you will be charged a cleaning fee. This covers vomiting, spillages and contamination. Depending on the severity of the soiling incident, the driver will be compensated for the cleaning and the inconvenience."

    "Drivers work hard to maintain clean vehicles. A clean up fee for damage to the interior or exterior of the vehicle incurred as a result of events such as vomiting or pet accidents will be assessed and charged when applicable. In most cases, this fee will be $100 - $200, but the exact amount depends on the extent of the damage. We will always notify you when such a charge is necessary."

    However I distinctly recall watching training videos when I first started out that discussed this issue and how they factored in more than just 'damage' but time/fares lost, etc.

    Apparently that is just marketing BS now.

    Just making sure other drivers are informed so they are not screwed out of a cleaning fee.
     
  2. scrurbscrud

    scrurbscrud Well-Known Member

    You only get written instructions if you actually have had the problem AND reported it in their system in the ways provided. I'm sure there are a lot of drivers that just clean up the mess and don't even know they can get paid for it or don't know how to use the app to make the initial report.

    They'll only figure it out once they've had the problem. The first time I used it it took several minutes for the app to even respond correctly after I went through the steps. Then had to do it over again once the app came back to it's senses. If you take another ride (can't imagine doing that but if you cleaned up, didn't report it and took another pax you may be screwed or at least it will be much more difficult to get it through Uber's system
     
  3. KeJorn

    KeJorn Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Mars
    Driving:
    UberX
    True, ONLY after you report it. Hope the driver thinks to take a photo of the vomit first.

    I immediately reported it through the fare review method they provide.
    It seemed to go through just fine and put me back online immediately afterwards (which I then went offline, since my car was in no condition to take another rider - though I had initially intended to drive for several more hours before this incident occurred).

    Two days later, still no email asking for more details etc, as I have seen with other fare reviews.
    So I sent an email asking about the status and I provided more details on the incident that took place.
    Uber Partner Support responds back that they have no record of that fare review.
    How interesting.

    However in their response, they rattle off the above information, even though I already provided the details of the incident, but they make no note of beginning to work from that info.
    So since I do not have a photo, I will likely lose out on the cleaning fee.
     
  4. scrurbscrud

    scrurbscrud Well-Known Member

    No photo's No pay. If you don't have a good phone with a powerful flash feature to do the photo's yer probably screwed (yet again.)

    And don't get too wordy on any explanations either. I just say picked up pax in the general vicinity of (whatever bar) and they puked approx. x min. or 'a few minutes' into the ride. No mention of any other details is needed or required. OR any driver added sensationalism. Pax puked in my ride. End of story.

    I also pick up my free phone (obviously the std. Uber phone is NOT that phone) while the pax is in puke mode, hold it up and snap the pic in the general direction of the pax. I don't care if the photo turns out as I've yet to have them turn out. I just want the flash to go off so they THINK I caught them puking so they think they are undoubtedly on the hook. Save the troubles of dispute. I also mention in the initial email report (photos attached as needed for now) just in case they are forwarding my report to the pax if they are whining about it cause in their minds they think I have the goods to nail them 'as needed.'

    Half the time as soon as they sober up they'll try to fight it if you don't. They could give a **** about their messes or cleaning up.
     
  5. duggles

    duggles Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Denver
    Though it took Uber nearly a week to respond to my first (and only) puking incident, I had only submitted photos of the damage/puke. I did not submit a receipt as I cleaned it myself.

    Yet, they reimbursed me $200. No receipt required. The CSR may have ****ed up, or maybe they felt generous since I had sent 4 emails between Saturday evening and Wednesday that went unresponded to. Either way, if it happens again I will likely doctor the receipt that's supposed to be necessary.

    But I cleaned my own car, and spent several days shampooing the seat to get the smell out. It was everywhere. But I cleaned it more thoroughly than a car wash would have and spent several hours doing so over a couple of days. I would much rather get the full $200 that way than paying half of it to get someone else to do a seat/interior clean.
     

  6. KeJorn

    KeJorn Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Mars
    Driving:
    UberX
    Having someone vomit in our cars costs Uber drivers in MANY ways, not just physical damage:
    (1) lost fares due to ending our driving shift early to clean our vehicle (something I distinctly recall their training videos had mentioned as a reason for the high fee)
    (2) stains and smells that may linger even after cleaning that may affect future clients. (How do I share the smell with Uber Partner Support so I can be reimbursed for that??)
    (3) recent cases of Ebola (HERE IN DALLAS), making the spread of bodily fluids (like vomit) to be a serious health concern.

    If you don't have the photos, the least they could do, is message the requester and state that there is a cleaning fee being applied and see what their response is.
    Not simply denying the case just because photos were not taken.

    Sure the requester may deny it.
    But then again, they may say something that confirms it as well.

    So tired of being treated by Uber Partner Support as a 3rd class citizen who is not to be trusted or respected.
    Yet they call us "partners" and exist SOLELY because of the work we do and the income we generate.
     
    big Dave likes this.
  7. luiselyy

    luiselyy New Member

    Location:
    Los
    Driving:
    Lyft
    Lyft is pretty good about this. All they required was the time, drop off-pick up location and pictures. A week later I got a total of $250 for the incident
     
    big Dave and KeJorn like this.
  8. SF CURBSERVER

    SF CURBSERVER Member

    Location:
    Sf
    **** that ****. 200 is not worth vomit in ur car. But I have gotten money for a ****er eating a burrito in my car. Hit that ***** with a cleaning fee
     
  9. scrurbscrud

    scrurbscrud Well-Known Member

    It's unfortunate that puke pax are probably the best $ there is in ride share.
     
  10. luiselyy

    luiselyy New Member

    Location:
    Los
    Driving:
    Lyft
    Lol
     
  11. scrurbscrud

    scrurbscrud Well-Known Member

    If I could get guaranteed pukers I'd set my vehicle up for it and RAKE it in. That's about the only way to make any money. Let's see. 5 pukers a nite x $200.

    Yep!
     
    big Dave and Orlando_Driver like this.
  12. KeJorn

    KeJorn Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Mars
    Driving:
    UberX
    I am posting the following info, because it seems with Uber's current cleaning fee policy, they are not too concerned about the impact other than visual (photo based).
    It also seems they may be reneging on their policy / stance to reimburse drivers for time lost, etc, as they stated during training videos, etc, by ONLY reimbursing for the basic cleaning costs.
    If they are, I think they need to reconsider.

    Reference: http://www.fightbac.org/storage/documents/Childcare/Vomiting_and_Fecal_Episodes.pdf

    Public Health Concerns - Vomit

    Vomit can contain high levels of pathogenic microorganisms. Electron microscopic examination has revealed that a minimum of 106 norovirus particles is normally present in a milliliter of vomit. A vomiting episode can also release droplets containing pathogens into the air, and these aerosolized particles may be deposited onto surfaces in the surrounding area. Therefore, any surface that comes into direct contact with vomit or feces, or is located in the surrounding area, can easily become contaminated.

    For example, in 2002, an outbreak of norovirus at a concert hall occurred after a concert attendee vomited. The concert hall staff cleaned up the vomit, but they did not use a disinfectant. The day after the vomiting event, 257 people who attended events at the concert hall became ill. Additionally, 27 people became ill after attending events over the following three days. The highest attack rate (75%) was reported by people seated in the same section where the sick person was seated. Lower attack rates were reported for people sitting nearby. In 2011, more than 80 patrons became ill from a rural North Carolina restaurant that did not have proper sanitation guidelines, especially for vomit clean-up.

    As this shows, cleaning up vomit is critical to preventing the spread of pathogens. To do this, it is important to understand the difference between sanitizers and disinfectants, so the proper chemicals are used during clean-up. Sanitizers reduce the bacterial and fungal counts on a surface by 99.999% or 5 logs. For example, if there are 1 million bacteria on a surface before the sanitizer is applied, then there should only be 10 bacterial cells left after the sanitizer is dry. Disinfectants differ from sanitizers in that they eliminate all of the microorganisms listed on the label, which can include viruses. This is why it is important to use disinfectants when cleaning up vomit.

    If surfaces contaminated by vomit and diarrhea are not properly cleaned and disinfected, there is the possibility that pathogens could remain on the surface, which could sicken other individuals. Norovirus has been reported to survive on hard surfaces for up to 42 days, while rotavirus and hepatitis A virus can persist for up to 60 days on hard surfaces. Pathogenic bacteria can also survive for extended periods on hard surfaces. Escherichia coli can persist up to 28 days on metal surfaces and Clostridium difficile spores for up to five months.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration both have guidelines on the clean-up of bodily fluids.

    How to properly clean and disinfect:
    Droplets produced during vomiting and diarrhea can become airborne. Thus, it is important to clean and disinfect not only the surfaces that come in contact with the bodily fluids but also the surfaces located near the event (floors, walls, shelves, toys, etc.). Clean and disinfect surfaces in as wide of an area around the vomit or fecal episode as is practical for your facility.

    Hard surfaces:
    - Wipe surfaces first with a damp cloth to remove dust and other debris.
    - Disinfect the surface with a bleach solution of 1 and 1/2 cups bleach in 1 gallon of water (1:10 dilution) or an EPA-registered disinfectant that is effective against norovirus.
    - Allow the surface to air dry.
    - For food-contact surfaces, disinfection must be followed by a clear-water rinse to remove any harmful residue that may have been left by the disinfectant.

    Carpet and cloth furnishings:
    - Spot-clean areas where bodily fluid contamination has occurred to remove visible debris.
    - Steam clean the area at 170°F (76.7°C) for 5 minutes to disinfect. (Not all steam cleaners can reach a temperature for 170°F (76.7°C), so check the manufacturing specifications.)
    - Porous surfaces, such as upholstered furniture, that are soiled with vomit/feces can also be cleaned with a chlorine bleach solution (1:10 dilution) with a contact time of 10-20 minutes. However, the solution will likely cause discoloration of the material.
    Do not dry vacuum because microorganisms can become airborne.

    When searching for a steam cleaner (steam vacuum, preferably), be aware of the following:

    Steam Vac and Steam Vacuum:
    Vapor steam cleaner vacuums or steam vapor vacuums are cleaning appliances or devices that use steam to quickly dry, clean, and sanitize inanimate surfaces. The steam is produced in a boiler that heats tap water to high temperatures (240-310F/115-155C) to produce low-pressure (several atmospheres), low moisture (4 to 6% water) water vapor (steam). In addition to the steam produced, the unit will simultaneously vacuum as the unit steams. Units that do not produce steam are called carpet extractors or carpet shampooers. These sort of devices do not have a heating element to produce steam, and can only use the hot tap water you put in.

    Carpet Extractors:
    When you search for steam vac on the internet you will commonly see similar brands offered at 100’s of online retailers. You will see Bissell Steam Vacuums, Hoover Steam Vacuums, Dirt Devil Steam Vacuums, Eureka Steam Vacuums, Haan Steamers, Rug Doctor Steam Vacuums, Royal Steam Vacuums, etc. Some of these brands are steam cleaners that produce the hot steam at 240-310F but do not vacuum. Most other units advertised on big box stores are falsely advertised as steam vacs when they are really carpet extractors and shampooers with no heating element. Brands like Bissell, Hoover, etc can use the hot water from the tap, and then be used to extract suck the dirty water back up.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2014
    big Dave likes this.
  13. SF CURBSERVER

    SF CURBSERVER Member

    Location:
    Sf
    Should set up your car with a puke smell or vomit cologne that way when pax that are drunk smell it makes them wanna puke. Lol
     
    Uberon1986 and Jeff Rey Key like this.
  14. SF CURBSERVER

    SF CURBSERVER Member

    Location:
    Sf
    Anyone ever caught someone wiping there hands on ur backseat after eating something greasy like French fries.
     
    Jay2dresq likes this.
  15. scrurbscrud

    scrurbscrud Well-Known Member

    Will note for future use. Gradually insert odor. Play puke vids on DVD player. Swerve n jerk just enough.

    Kaboom!

    PAYDAY!!! ;)
     
    SF CURBSERVER likes this.
  16. duggles

    duggles Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Denver
    Nope. I often find makeup on the backseats.
     
    Rideshare.work likes this.
  17. scrurbscrud

    scrurbscrud Well-Known Member

    Turn the chicks face up, one arm each side of head..;)
     
    duggles likes this.
  18. Brandon1

    Brandon1 Member

    Location:
    Woodland Hills
    Do you have to say which particular passenger made a mess? If my car is just pretty dirty in general from doing a ton of rides after a weekend, can i just get a car wash and have uber reimburse me? I wouldnt want to get one person charged for a bunch of people's mess and whatnot
     
  19. KeJorn

    KeJorn Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Mars
    Driving:
    UberX
    Dirty in terms of tracking dirt into the car onto the floor mats, etc.. is understandable.
    Messes left on the seats (spills, stains, etc... esp if caused by vomit) should be reported at the time you rate your customer (fare review/cleaning fee).
    So yes, it is specific to the customer, as we are not talking about simply tracking dirt into the car (floor).

    One thing to note, when I first signed up with Uber, the ONLY amount I had ever heard stated for cleaning fee (during the video training and website) was the phrase: 'up to $200'.

    Recently, Partner Support made the following statement:
    "...there is a $100 maximum payout for cleaning fees on UberX rides."

    That was news to me.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2014
    big Dave and scrurbscrud like this.
  20. Sydney Uber

    Sydney Uber Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Sydney Australia
    Driving:
    UberBLACK
    What! Uber go back on their word?

    The only thing they can be trusted to do is find new ways to squeeze its drivers.

    If that means halving the clean up fee then Uber is simply following an established method of dealing with its drivers - **** on them every chance they get.
     
    big Dave likes this.

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