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Chicago Drivers: Snares, Traps, Dangers, Rip-offs...BEWARE!

AllenChicago

Well-Known Member
July 23, 2016

I'm starting this thread because it seems that the number of revenue generating tools, rules and schemes used by the city of Chicago, and some Chicago area businesses with ties to the city, are escalating exponentially this year.

For instance, I just learned from a UBER driver that he got a $120 automated ticket, because he didn't STOP FOR FOUR SECONDS before turning right, at a red light in Chicago. I had no idea that you had to stand still for more than 1 second, before turning right.

I've recently read in this forum where Chicago Uber/Lyft drivers have been slapped with insane tickets at the Airports, booted at a McDonalds, had their tires secretly inspected, and been silently ticketed by goons in the Loop.

As a service to each other, can we share what not to do, in the City of Chicago (and suburbs), in order to avoid having to pay a ticket, or fine. If we can line everything up here, this thread would become a great resource for helping Chicago drivers avoid a lot of financial traps, snares, and punishments, IMO. The city will get less revenue from us, but it'll manage. Thanks in advance to all contributors!! :smiles:

-Allen
 

80sDude

Well-Known Member
I first red light ticket for " No turn on red" was prolly 4 years ago.. Welcome to Chicago... and they wonder why people here are so cranky now
 

WestBurbsMac

Well-Known Member
I just got a $100 turn-on-red camera ticket in Berwyn because, while I stopped properly and allowed a car to pass, my tires were just across the line.
 

WestBurbsMac

Well-Known Member
Unless it's changed Illinois law does not specify an amount of time for a stop. I contested camera ticket for a right turn citing this and won, though it was in the suburbs where due process exists.
I don't think there is. The car has to "rock back" as I understand the definition. The "rule of thumb" is 3 seconds.
 

WestSubDriver

Well-Known Member
Good idea for a thread. With the city's bond rating just a notch above junk you have to figure that thousands of Uber and Lyft drivers are ripe targets for fines and citations to generate revenue. All drivers must be aware that the fines laid out in the ordinance are not trivial - up to $1,000 per violation. There is a report on here of a driver recently getting pinched in the Midway holding lot for several violations. Educate yourself at:

http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/bacp/supp_info/transportation-network-providers.html

New amended ordinance language is not on that website yet (I have attached here) but you should pay attention to the Know How to Identify a TNP document. Don't trust that either TNP company has told you everything you need to know. I don't recall hearing anything from Uber about needing to have a copy of TNP Terms of Service Agreement in my car.
 

Attachments

UberServant

Well-Known Member
I agree with the author of this thread, the city of Chicago are predators, preying on motorists and obviously Uber drivers are easy targets. My one word of advice is never break a traffic law just to pick or drop someone off. I think the most likely of these is the illegal U turn. Don't do it, drive around the block or whatever is needed. The passenger can either wait another minute or two or get dropped off on the opposite side of the street or pay a few more cents for you to drive the block.
 

PRC

Active Member
Here are my 5 cents: Was pulled over this Friday by Palatine police after picking up 2 drunk girls downtown palatine. The officer was very friendly, and explained that he pulled me over to make sure that all passengers are buckled up, and that there are no open containers in the vehicle. After they buckled, he let me go with no citation or warning, bu told me that I must ask my passengers to buckle up, and that if he pulls me over again - there will be a ticket.
 

pizza guy

Well-Known Member
Here are my 5 cents: Was pulled over this Friday by Palatine police after picking up 2 drunk girls downtown palatine. The officer was very friendly, and explained that he pulled me over to make sure that all passengers are buckled up, and that there are no open containers in the vehicle. After they buckled, he let me go with no citation or warning, bu told me that I must ask my passengers to buckle up, and that if he pulls me over again - there will be a ticket.
Glad he was nice, but doesn't he need a reason to pull you over? If the riders were in the back there is no way he could tell the seat belt situation. I'm also curious if he knew you were a ride share driver when he pulled you over.
Also if you are ever pulled over for stupid reason and the cop becomes really nice when he see you're sober, keep this mind: Uber drivers make more off DUI's than the government.
 

WestSubDriver

Well-Known Member
"As a service to each other, can we share what not to do,"

Don't drive for 90 cents a mile or pool. but that should be self-evident.
Good points to make for newbies. A new driver may need to suck it up for awhile until promotions start getting offered. I only drive when a promotion or guarantee gives me the chance to make an acceptable rate.

I only choke down Pool when needing it to meet promotion requirements and even then I'm resorting to fare reviews to see what more I can extract out of Uber. Pool is the new Uber profit enhancer they are pushing on us so that they can take the bulk of the true fare on those additional passengers. Go ahead, ask that second or third Pool pax what they are being charged and look at what Uber is paying you on. Your eyes shall be opened.
 

PRC

Active Member
Glad he was nice, but doesn't he need a reason to pull you over? If the riders were in the back there is no way he could tell the seat belt situation. I'm also curious if he knew you were a ride share driver when he pulled you over.
Also if you are ever pulled over for stupid reason and the cop becomes really nice when he see you're sober, keep this mind: Uber drivers make more off DUI's than the government.
There was sort of check point, where cops were checking every car exiting the bar area. I've seen lots of these in Schaumburg and Hoffman, but never in palatine. So yes, he saw that the passengers were not buckled before he told me to pull a side. And he knew I was Uber, cause I had all my signs displayed.
 

AllenChicago

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #17
Good idea for a thread. With the city's bond rating just a notch above junk you have to figure that thousands of Uber and Lyft drivers are ripe targets for fines and citations to generate revenue. All drivers must be aware that the fines laid out in the ordinance are not trivial - up to $1,000 per violation. There is a report on here of a driver recently getting pinched in the Midway holding lot for several violations. Educate yourself at:

http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/bacp/supp_info/transportation-network-providers.html

New amended ordinance language is not on that website yet (I have attached here) but you should pay attention to the Know How to Identify a TNP document. Don't trust that either TNP company has told you everything you need to know. I don't recall hearing anything from Uber about needing to have a copy of TNP Terms of Service Agreement in my car.
Thank-you very much for attaching the updated June 22, 2016 City Ordinance to your post, WestSubDriver. I'm beginning to understand now why guarantees are becoming more spotty, and less generous. I'm sure both Uber and Lyft are gearing up to adhere to the new requirements prior to the 90-day (Sept 22, 2016) deadline.

The photo ID's that we'll be required to keep in our vehicles will not be cheap, when multiplied over many thousands of drivers. Developing the online Driver Certification course, and driver completion/tracking capability, adds additional financial burden to Uber and Lyft. I don't understand the entire Ordinance, due to the way certain items are worded and crossed-out, but it appears to be a landmine of potential fines against both the TNC companies, and their drivers. Thanks again for finding and posting the June 22nd amendment to the TNC ordinance, WestSubDriver!
-Allen
 

chrisbk88

Member
I just got a $100 turn-on-red camera ticket in Berwyn because, while I stopped properly and allowed a car to pass, my tires were just across the line.
You may not have been unless you've already received it in the mail. They say that all red light violations are supposed to be reviewed by an actual person. And I have personally been flashed for stopping at a red over the line but never received the actual ticket. It's ludicrous if you think about it, receiving a ticket when you're actually stopped, just because your car is a few inches too far forward. Hopefully you don't receive anything either.
 

driving312

Well-Known Member
As a service to each other, I will share what to do, in the City of Chicago (and suburbs), in order to avoid having to pay a ticket, or fine. I will line everything up here:

Be a good driver. End of discussion. Very simple actually- there is no secret.

If you get red-light tickets, speed-camera tickets, etc etc. You screwed up and you're not a good driver. Admit it, pay for your mistake, and be a better driver.

The proper name for this thread:
Chicago Bad Drivers: You did nothing wrong! Snares, Traps, Dangers, Rip-offs...BEWARE Traffic Laws that are out to get bad drivers like you!
 

WestSubDriver

Well-Known Member
I will keep this in the vein of being constructive and informative for the driver community instead of castigating.

** We should all be even more aware of the traps and rip-offs that Uber is setting for us **

I have experienced Uber showing me a different fare for incremental Pool passengers than what passengers told me themselves they were paying. Per our Terms of Service, Uber is to provide a receipt to the passenger and "such receipt" is also to be provided to us. Because, after all, their agreement says they are providing that receipt "on our behalf" (i.e. the transaction is between us and the passenger and Uber is just the middleman).

First advice - don't take Pool rides unless you need to for promotions. If you do Pool rides, scrutinize the fares afterward especially the distance charged to incremental riders. Fare review is your weapon against getting short-changed. Go into that passenger's ride and submit a fare review and start asking questions about the fare calculation. Trust me, the initial auto-reply will be "this falls within the range of our estimate, blah blah blah". Don't give up.

We all know that one of Uber's largest expenses is legal and they obviously have good lawyers. You must be quick about your fare review. The language in our agreement with them says you only have 3 business days after provision of the services to submit any correction to them regarding a fare. After that, you have accepted the fare they gave you and you agree you can't hold them liable for any "mistakes" in the fare calculation.
 
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