Inshur

Check your pay statements vs your Partner Invoices

deesto

Active Member
On the web browser, on partners.uber.com, check that your UBER Fee displayed on the pay statements matches in value to what is shown on the partners invoice section (generated each week, or even every time you cash a faster payment). For me, It doesn’t tally up since Apr, and they have also stopped listing in the clean air fee component, which they substract from the gross sales, which is what they pay us. So they really need to display that again, as well as any fees that are fares split fees (as they initially pay us ~£0.40(Gross sales), and then substract that from the gross pay(commission expenses))

Both the omission of the clean air fee component on these invoices, and the wrong figure displayed for the uber fee (simple maths gone wrong), will give your wrong figures for Gross sales, expense fees, and can ultimately lead to display wrong profit and loss figures (in terms of record keeping mostly, and accounting purposes).

I have already alerted them of the mistake. But check if it happens to you as well, and let them know!

Our payments seem to be corect and so do the statements thankfully. But as we need these invoices to justify to HMRC the correct amount of expenses taken from our gross sales, in terms of record keeping, we desperately need these to be correct as well.

Should be just a temp techy glitch, hopefully, not a big deal, but they can’t supply us wrong figures on these invoices and make them up like that. Anyone else with the issue? Feel free to comment below.

Ps. If you rely on your pay statements for accounting generating purposes you have nothing to worrry about. All seemed to be correct still. But we need these invoices ultimately to justify to HMRC of the charges being levied upon us by UBER, which we will treat as expenses because we technically pay THEM that. These invoices are the expenses receipts that we need to retain for record keeping purposes. I hope it all makes sense (and hope you understand why it’s importsnt we get these correctly calculated with all the items correctly listed and added up))! We can use pay statements for record keeping purposes, I suppose, but strictly speaking, HMRC still does require Invoices and/or receipts for expense justification (even if they are simplified).

Post automatically merged:

Incidentally. In case you didn’t know, as well as your total uber fares, all tolls, tips, split fare fees, cancellations, clean air fee component, London central fees that are listed in positive in the statement, the sum of all of that, combined, is your actual gross sales (what you would invoice UBER for, and use that as the profit figure), for which in all, we get taxed :frown:.

Our expenses would be the uber fee commission, clean air fee component, split fare fees listed as negative on the pay stament - or within the partner invoices - (plus fuel mot, road tax etc etc etc etc etc).

This becomes more evident that you get right if you are VAT registered (even on flat scheme), as the reverse charge will apply, so gets messy and therefore needs to be accounted for properly.

If you are not, the record keeping is much simpler as you will list the clean air and central fee plus tolls plus split fares as a sale in your P&L, and simply net that with the expenses of the airport tolls, clean air fee and split fares that you pay to Uber. The resulting tax you have to pay each year might be the same as if you omitted to list these netting figures, but your invoices and the record keeping and listing of it all, will not reflect accurately what’s happening in the accounting world HMRC requires.
Post automatically merged:

Incidentally, You will know whether you have contracted a good accountant, if they understand and follow this procedure like so. Or a bad one if they just let you work it all out, hope for the best, and hope you give them the right figures at the end of the tax year.
 
Last edited:

deesto

Active Member
This is why our tips gets taxed (as nothing to net it against), and acts as part of the gross sale. The same applies to that extra 50p you get from an airport parking toll. (Ie you pay £4.50 to the airport, but UBER gives you £5 toll. The resulting 50p profit is taxed). Or remember the central London fee of £1 per trip (or incentive, surge, and bonus). It’s not £1 you receive. It’s £1 minus tax! You will net these £1s profits against the CC expenses, but if you never paid CC, know that these extra £1s then they DO get taxed :frown:
 

Shane Sheikh

Well-Known Member
This is why you keep receipts of parkings tickets, and know you will have record of Cc charge which you can show to your accountant
This is why our tips gets taxed (as nothing to net it against), and acts as part of the gross sale. The same applies to that extra 50p you get from an airport parking toll. (Ie you pay £4.50 to the airport, but UBER gives you £5 toll. The resulting 50p profit is taxed). Or remember the central London fee of £1 per trip (or incentive, surge, and bonus). It’s not £1 you receive. It’s £1 minus tax! You will net these £1s profits against the CC expenses, but if you never paid CC, know that these extra £1s then they DO get taxed :frown:
 

deesto

Active Member
Not Tax Deductable.

But still an expenditure.

Surely not the same thing?


Though the above article was talking about Corporation Tax. And self employed people don't pay Corporation Tax

You have to show it on your books, the money doesn't come out of the air.

If you want to record these as expenditure, perhaps your accountant may want to record them as disallowable expenses. But the end result is the same though..: Not Tax Deductible.
Post automatically merged:

However, I'd venture out and say that if you get a parking fine, like at McDonalds or Sainsburys for overstaying, part of me thinks this would be a parking allowable expense. This is because they do not issue PCNs, (they also do not come from the council), so technically you haven't breached the law.. you've merely stayed long enough to incur a massive parking charge :biggrin:
 
Last edited:
Top