Business Pax - Tip Shaming

CarterPeerless

Well-Known Member
I posted this idea in the Tips forum. Reposting here for my PHX people:

Recently I had a passenger that was a vice president at one of the worlds largest medical supply companies. He took UberX and gave no tip, which got me thinking. His company is paying for 100% of expenses. There is no reason for him to be a cheap ass.

Business travelers, especially those that work for big companies, have expense accounts that explicitly allow for customary tipping. Some even mandate the practice, and specify the rates that business travelers can/must give. Companies do not expect their travelers to stiff their waitstaff and taxi drivers - and it should not extend to their TNC driver, should they choose that mode of transportation.

I suggest that all drivers who find out that they are transporting a business person on an expense account - who doesn't tip - contact that passenger's company to complain. Nearly every company now has a "Contact Us" page on their website. If you are feeling particularly motivated, take it to twitter. Watch how fast company policies shift to mandatory tipping for business travelers.

https://uberpeople.net/threads/business-pax-tip-shaming.90189/
 

Teksaz

Well-Known Member
Had a business paxman the other day ask if I had change for a twenty and I told him no for obvious reasons. He said oh yes I totally agree with you doing what you do. Gave me the twenty and said great ride, thanks.

They're not all Dbags but most are. Obviously that hasn't happened but just a hand full of times. If you tell them you don't have change, one of two things is going to happen. Tip or no tip. No tip is the norm.
 

Jiggie

Active Member
I posted this idea in the Tips forum. Reposting here for my PHX people:

Recently I had a passenger that was a vice president at one of the worlds largest medical supply companies. He took UberX and gave no tip, which got me thinking. His company is paying for 100% of expenses. There is no reason for him to be a cheap ass.

Business travelers, especially those that work for big companies, have expense accounts that explicitly allow for customary tipping. Some even mandate the practice, and specify the rates that business travelers can/must give. Companies do not expect their travelers to stiff their waitstaff and taxi drivers - and it should not extend to their TNC driver, should they choose that mode of transportation.

I suggest that all drivers who find out that they are transporting a business person on an expense account - who doesn't tip - contact that passenger's company to complain. Nearly every company now has a "Contact Us" page on their website. If you are feeling particularly motivated, take it to twitter. Watch how fast company policies shift to mandatory tipping for business travelers.

https://uberpeople.net/threads/business-pax-tip-shaming.90189/
As a person who travels extensively for business and drives for Uber on my free time when home occasionally, I see this from both sides. While some of what you say is accurate, most of the items you point out are not as common in the business world as you may think. One of the major issues is that a vast majority of business travelers DO NOT carry cash when on the road for work, so if Uber did add a tipping feature that could go on top of the fare and be charged, I think that would help. Every company has different expense policies, some are more generous but most can be more restrictive after the last rescission. Hell, the differences between my company and my wife's with respect to travel is night and day and she works for a billion dollar large corporation, but has such a restrictive expense policy... She has to use hotel shuttles whenever possible and if she was to use ride sharing services, it always had to be the cheapest class of service (ie. UberX) cash tips and surge pricing aren't reimbursed unless its to the airport within 4 hours of departure time (Surge pricing only).

Now, your stance that just because someone has a title, works for a major corporation or is wealthy is a bad person if they don't tip you? You lose me there. We have become a culture infatuated with deserving of a tip... I'm sorry, your job and what you are paid for is to transport someone from one location to another... If thats all you did, how does that merit a tip? Where is the added value that should be met with added money? Now, if someone is going to have you run around doing errands, have to detour or another pickup, or get someone looking for water or gum or even a charger or you offer an entertaining conversation and make the drive more of an experience than a simple transport... you added a service aspect that absolutely can be argued for a tip, but just because someone got in your car and you drove them 15 minutes down the road, and thats it... there was no value added to the task, why should you get more for doing the task?

As for wanting to 'Shame' an organization or an individual, I can assure you that in most cases it won't do a thing. You'll either get laughed at, ignored, slapped with a lawsuit or even be banned from driving for Uber if they find out... and Uber always sides with the passenger over the partner.
 
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BlueSkies

Active Member
I've never taken a taxi, ordered a pizza delivery, room service, sky cab, haircut, manicure or drinks / food in a restaurant without leaving a tip. Minimum 20%. (Unless the service was particularly horrible) There's an expectation in most of these types of services of a tip, however meager. Just because Uber has proclaimed that it's a cashless service and has unfortunately promoted "no tip required" does not relieve the public of a commonly and socially accepted practice.
 

CarterPeerless

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
I can't say how society has become what it has become. But in America, it is the social norm to provide a gratuity to people who perform certain tasks. If you do not participate, you are a classless jerk.

In other parts of the world, gratuities are uncommon. Here is part of the social norm, and is built into the economy of certain indusrties.
 

Hey now

Well-Known Member
I was in sales for 18 years. Every time I wrote on my expense report +5 cash tip or +2 for car wash tip I was always reimbursed, no questions asked.
 

Phxdriver

Well-Known Member
As a person who travels extensively for business and drives for Uber on my free time when home occasionally, I see this from both sides. While some of what you say is accurate, most of the items you point out are not as common in the business world as you may think. One of the major issues is that a vast majority of business travelers DO NOT carry cash when on the road for work, so if Uber did add a tipping feature that could go on top of the fare and be charged, I think that would help. Every company has different expense policies, some are more generous but most can be more restrictive after the last rescission. Hell, the differences between my company and my wife's with respo travel is night and day and she works for a billion dollar large corporation, but has such a restrictive expense policy... She has to use hotel shuttles whenever possible and if she was to use ride sharing services, it always had to be the cheapest class of service (ie. UberX) cash tips and surge pricing aren't reimbursed unless its to the airport within 4 hours of departure time (Surge pricing only).

Now, your stance that just because someone has a title, works for a major corporation or is wealthy is a bad person if they don't tip you? You lose me there. We have become a culture infatuated with deserving of a tip... I'm sorry, your job and what you are paid for is to transport someone from one location to another... If thats all you did, how does that merit a tip? Where is the added value that should be met with added money? Now, if someone is going to have you run around doing errands, have to detour or another pickup, or get someone looking for water or gum or even a charger or you offer an entertaining conversation and make the drive more of an experience than a simple transport... you added a service aspect that absolutely can be argued for a tip, but just because someone got in your car and you drove them 15 minutes down the road, and thats it... there was no value added to the task, why should you get more for doing the task?

As for wanting to 'Shame' an organization or an individual, I can assure you that in most cases it won't do a thing. You'll either get laughed at, ignored, slapped with a lawsuit or even be banned from driving for Uber if they find out... and Uber always sides with the passenger over the partner.
Boring lecture and definition and cheapo. Really, you and wife big travellers and you drive uber in your spare time? Stop living in the past that job ended.
 

Tequila Jake

Well-Known Member
I used to travel a lot with a large corporation and back then, getting reimbursed for cash tips was fairly normal and straightforward. However, in the company I work for now, and this is likely true of other companies, all travel expenses are expected to be put on the corporate travel card. Getting reimbursed for cash outlays requires an exception process that requires going through multiple approvals.

Summary:

Add a tip on the card for a Lyft ride -- no problem. Add a cash tip for an Uber ride -- big problem.
 

backstreets-trans

Well-Known Member
I used to travel a lot with a large corporation and back then, getting reimbursed for cash tips was fairly normal and straightforward. However, in the company I work for now, and this is likely true of other companies, all travel expenses are expected to be put on the corporate travel card. Getting reimbursed for cash outlays requires an exception process that requires going through multiple approvals.

Summary:

Add a tip on the card for a Lyft ride -- no problem. Add a cash tip for an Uber ride -- big problem.
They're still tipping us cab drivers 100% of the time. They have 4 option 10%, 15%, 20% or other. To stiff us they have to hit other then type in $0.00. It's easier for them to tip unless they're from India then they hit other and $1.00.
 

Jiggie

Active Member
The biggest solution for business travelers would be to just simply add the tipping feature into the app so its gets included as a line item in the original fare. Uber is really screwing its partners and also making it difficult for many people by not simply just giving the option... it would still retain it's 'Cashless' initiative and at the same time allow those who want to tip an option. As it stands now, its inconvenient for passengers and screwing the drivers.
 

Jiggie

Active Member
They're still tipping us cab drivers 100% of the time. They have 4 option 10%, 15%, 20% or other. To stiff us they have to hit other then type in $0.00. It's easier for them to tip unless they're from India then they hit other and $1.00.
It's easy to tip a cab driver as it can all be put into the same transaction. Lyft at least gives the option, and Uber just doesn't give a shit... It also should not be that difficult as you can designate a tip amount for UberTAXI through Uber...
 

Jiggie

Active Member
I used to travel a lot with a large corporation and back then, getting reimbursed for cash tips was fairly normal and straightforward. However, in the company I work for now, and this is likely true of other companies, all travel expenses are expected to be put on the corporate travel card. Getting reimbursed for cash outlays requires an exception process that requires going through multiple approvals.

Summary:

Add a tip on the card for a Lyft ride -- no problem. Add a cash tip for an Uber ride -- big problem.
Pretty much a lot of companies now have restored to outsourcing a lot of the expense process. Over the last 5 years my company went from doing spreadsheets and receipts internally to using Concur and now Certify which automate a lot of the process and make it that much more of a pain in the ass to add 'Cash' on top of a credit card transaction as some policies force you to sync credit card statements against actual expenses, etc.
 

Phoenix666

Active Member
As a person who travels extensively for business and drives for Uber on my free time when home occasionally, I see this from both sides. While some of what you say is accurate, most of the items you point out are not as common in the business world as you may think. One of the major issues is that a vast majority of business travelers DO NOT carry cash when on the road for work, so if Uber did add a tipping feature that could go on top of the fare and be charged, I think that would help. Every company has different expense policies, some are more generous but most can be more restrictive after the last rescission. Hell, the differences between my company and my wife's with respect to travel is night and day and she works for a billion dollar large corporation, but has such a restrictive expense policy... She has to use hotel shuttles whenever possible and if she was to use ride sharing services, it always had to be the cheapest class of service (ie. UberX) cash tips and surge pricing aren't reimbursed unless its to the airport within 4 hours of departure time (Surge pricing only).

Now, your stance that just because someone has a title, works for a major corporation or is wealthy is a bad person if they don't tip you? You lose me there. We have become a culture infatuated with deserving of a tip... I'm sorry, your job and what you are paid for is to transport someone from one location to another... If thats all you did, how does that merit a tip? Where is the added value that should be met with added money? Now, if someone is going to have you run around doing errands, have to detour or another pickup, or get someone looking for water or gum or even a charger or you offer an entertaining conversation and make the drive more of an experience than a simple transport... you added a service aspect that absolutely can be argued for a tip, but just because someone got in your car and you drove them 15 minutes down the road, and thats it... there was no value added to the task, why should you get more for doing the task?

As for wanting to 'Shame' an organization or an individual, I can assure you that in most cases it won't do a thing. You'll either get laughed at, ignored, slapped with a lawsuit or even be banned from driving for Uber if they find out... and Uber always sides with the passenger over the partner.
Jiggle do us all a favor...step in front of the light rail.
 

PHXTE

Well-Known Member
I used to travel a lot with a large corporation and back then, getting reimbursed for cash tips was fairly normal and straightforward. However, in the company I work for now, and this is likely true of other companies, all travel expenses are expected to be put on the corporate travel card. Getting reimbursed for cash outlays requires an exception process that requires going through multiple approvals.

Summary:

Add a tip on the card for a Lyft ride -- no problem. Add a cash tip for an Uber ride -- big problem.
Every company is different. I travel a fair bit for work and I don't have a corporate card. Which is fine with me because I can put the expenses on my personal card and then collect the rewards.
 
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