All communications with uber come from the Philippines, at slave wages and long hours.

cleansafepolite

Well-Known Member
Why do emails from uber suck? Becuase they are written by Filipinos working long hours for slave wages with large quotas. These people who are working for between 200 and 600 U.S. dollars PER MONTH. They are responsable for all research into claims and all writtwn emails. If you get an email response from them that has nothing to do with your issue it is becuase english is NOT THIER FIRST LANGUAGE. and becuase they have a ridiculous amount to process everyday to keep thier jobs. If you are deactivated or not paid correctly good luck explaining your case, they have about 5 minutes to spend on each reply. SOME are just using templates so that they can meet or exceed thier quota..cookie cutter responses. They dont care about you. They care about keeping thier jobs...if a letter makes it to thier supervisor it is looked at as a failure on thier part, they will be reprimanded and fired if they often have letters go to the supervisor for not being handled properly. This is why they sweep you under the rug or have you terminated without recoarse...you dont matter..your problems dont matter. YOUR APPEALS WILL BE SWEPT UNDER THE RUG SO THAT THEY CAN PROTECT THIER JOBS.
 

uberparadise

Well-Known Member
Why do emails from uber suck? Becuase they are written by Filipinos working long hours for slave wages with large quotas. These people who are working for between 200 and 600 U.S. dollars PER MONTH. They are responsable for all research into claims and all writtwn emails. If you get an email response from them that has nothing to do with your issue it is becuase english is NOT THIER FIRST LANGUAGE. and becuase they have a ridiculous amount to process everyday to keep thier jobs. If you are deactivated or not paid correctly good luck explaining your case, they have about 5 minutes to spend on each reply. SOME are just using templates so that they can meet or exceed thier quota..cookie cutter responses. They dont care about you. They care about keeping thier jobs...if a letter makes it to thier supervisor it is looked at as a failure on thier part, they will be reprimanded and fired if they often have letters go to the supervisor for not being handled properly. This is why they sweep you under the rug or have you terminated without recoarse...you dont matter..your problems dont matter. YOUR APPEALS WILL BE SWEPT UNDER THE RUG SO THAT THEY CAN PROTECT THIER JOBS.
I love those interesting first names. Uber does not miss a chance to save money. They push each of us to our breaking points. They also insult us with their 2nd grade charts and graphs.
 

Huberis

Well-Known Member
Why do emails from uber suck? Becuase they are written by Filipinos working long hours for slave wages with large quotas. These people who are working for between 200 and 600 U.S. dollars PER MONTH. They are responsable for all research into claims and all writtwn emails. If you get an email response from them that has nothing to do with your issue it is becuase english is NOT THIER FIRST LANGUAGE. and becuase they have a ridiculous amount to process everyday to keep thier jobs. If you are deactivated or not paid correctly good luck explaining your case, they have about 5 minutes to spend on each reply. SOME are just using templates so that they can meet or exceed thier quota..cookie cutter responses. They dont care about you. They care about keeping thier jobs...if a letter makes it to thier supervisor it is looked at as a failure on thier part, they will be reprimanded and fired if they often have letters go to the supervisor for not being handled properly. This is why they sweep you under the rug or have you terminated without recoarse...you dont matter..your problems dont matter. YOUR APPEALS WILL BE SWEPT UNDER THE RUG SO THAT THEY CAN PROTECT THIER JOBS.
I'd guess the poor writing on average has more to do with time and workload than ability. I would also guess much of what they write is as scripted as possible.
 

cleansafepolite

Well-Known Member
Screenshot_2015-12-26-13-27-32.png
 

cleansafepolite

Well-Known Member
I'd guess the poor writing on average has more to do with time and workload than ability. I would also guess much of what they write is as scripted as possible.
Absolutely, Many filipinos with college degrees are forced to take up work with abismal employers like uber. Who take advantage of 10 hour workdays with no overtime pay...dont think that means a 50 hour work week. NO. They are not given weekly overtime until after 60 hours. 240 hours per month for 200 bucks ....if they are single they fall into a different tax bracket and make about 180 bucks. YUP less than one dollar per hour it makes me sick. I have nothing but love for the Filipino people. Its to much work too little money. Did i mention the average commute time near metro manilla is 2hours? Children grow up without parents becuase of predetors like uber.
 

cleansafepolite

Well-Known Member
Yes..because they can. everybody gets the shaft except the ones counting the money..arent they smug about it? Dont think for a second 2 or 3 hundred bucks spreads alot more on the philippines..these people are taking thier showers with buckets and and paying for thier childrens educations with all of thier savings..why? So that thier kids can get thier degrees and work for companies like uber...1/2 of all call centers and customer service workers in the Philippines have MEDICAL DEGREES.
 

cleansafepolite

Well-Known Member
I could give an extensive list of garbage giant comapnies getting free labor from interns in the Philippines..PIZZA HUT, Mcdonalds, Washington Mutual, Best Western...In Pizza huts case...interns are students of hospitality management, they make arrangements with the colleges and students cannot graduate without providing free labor. What THE HELL is somebody going to learn about hospitality management working in a dAmn pizza hut or mcdonalds? ...wash dishes or do not graduate...graduate and pizza hut MAY HAVE A JOB FOR YOU...Its wrong on so many levels. Someday they will have plans like this for us..unless we stop them now.
 

ClevelandUberRider

Well-Known Member
In India and the Philippines, two of the largest offshored call center countries, the average call center / customer service industry pay there, when compared to their national average, is very attractive. That is why when you set up a call center in Utah and pay the CSRs $12 an hour, you get a 22-year old high school dropout single parent with two kids or a 65 year old grandma on SS. But setting one up in India and pay $4 an hour will get you choice college graduates. A lot of IIT (the prestigious Indian Institute of Technology) graduates are working in tech support, but also the regular, general, non-tech CSR call centers in India. To get such a job there, you need to "know people".

Similarly, in China, the managers of American fast food restaurants are all college graduates, some from the top elite institutions. Here, not so much.

(Edit: Corrected the spelling of the Philippines.)
 
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sellkatsell44

Well-Known Member
You know what you can get in the PI with 600US a month?? Lol they're living pretty well.

Pretty much.

Here's the tough Q though (how far are you willing to go in your daily life to contribute to a change), because uber is seen as a giant evil (not saying it isn't or is) but they're simply one company in a long string of companies. Like a domino effect.

People weren't going to buy shiet during the economic meltdown unless retailers lowered the price enough that it made sense for them. The problem with that is that the companies in turn, let go a lot of its employees or did a combo of let go/trimming + less wages/raise freeze, etcetc.


See

The thing is, regardless of how much anyone lobbies; even if you make the company do something (finally), they'll take it out elsewhere. Like the stupid taxes and fees (I'm paying to build Verizon cell towers?!) that cell phone companies tackle on on top of other usual snazz

Or when debit cards couldn't generate as much fees for the banks--hey! No more cash back on debit cards for you folks.


You need someone in the office that not only sees the problems, and understands how to stay on both sides (not easy) while overall getting shiet done to move the economy.

I heard the prez state speech and color me unimpressed but than again I haven't been super impressed with him and the issues he's tackling but that's lil ol me.

Big businesses like uber won't bow down, and won't change the way it does business unless you can effectively show them a better way to do business and how it can benefit them in the long term, rather than immediate "success" which is how they're currently operating imho. They don't look down five years and see how their model is "sustainable".
 

ClevelandUberRider

Well-Known Member
Since the between-country income comparison is an interesting topic, let me spend the next half hour discussing the two ways of comparisons.

Let's see.

Nominal per capita income in the Philippines is USD 3,568.

(Using the upper limit of OP's alleged Filipino CSRs' pay range)

USD 600 per months x 12 months per year = USD 7,200 per year.

That is slightly more than double of the Philippines' nominal per capital income.

Just for comparison:

In the U.S., the nominal per capita income is $54,629.

(The following discussion is purely on the income-earner's income status viz a viz that of his own countrymen.)

For a CSR in the U.S. to enjoy the same income status as the Filipino CSR who earns USD 600 per month, he will have to earn $110,237.89 a year, or $9,186.49 per month, here in the U.S.

(The following discussion is about how much you can buy with the money, as certain things are cheaper in some countries, a concept captured in PPP, or purchasing power parity. The PPP captures the purchasing power of a citizen considering a basket of goods the average citizen "consumes" including shelter, food, clothing, education, transportation, etc., just like the basket of goods used in estimating the inflation rate.)

According to PPP, one USD can buy goods and services in the Philippines that are worth $2.19899 in the U.S.

So, the Filipino CSR, earning $600 per month, has the purchasing power in her country, that is equal to the purchasing power in the U.S. of someone making $15,833 (rounded to the closest dollar).

In other words, in the U.S., a CSR who earns $15,833 can enjoy the material comfort in the U.S. As someone earning $600 per month in the Philippines can in that country.

As seems to be implied by AyyoStephen, this seems to be understating the purchasing power of a dollar in the Philippines. Observations from my international travel convinced me that the PPPs generally understate the purchasing power of citizens in many countries with lower nominal per capita income than ours. But here, we continue our discussing assuming the official PPP figures are correct (which is the practice of almost all academic as well as media discussions). Also, we disregard the impact of different tax rates on income. The per capita income figures are gross income figures, and most industrialized countries have combined higher income tax rates than developing and less developed countries, so the Filipino CSR gets to keep more of her gross income. But as stated earlier, we disregard this for simpler discussion.

(The two comparisons discussed)

So, as you can see, a CSR or a FT Uber driver earning net income of more than $15,833 will enjoy more material comfort than a Filipino CSR earning $600 per month. But, who has higher (purely income) status in their respective societies? The American CSR making $15,833 earns less than half of her average countryman, while the Filipino CSR (even though enjoying similar purchasing power from her salary) earns double of her average countryman.

So the question often becomes: If limited to only the following two choices, is some one happier (A) having the ability to buy more stuff in a country where a great majority of her countrymen can buy even more stuff than her (America), or (B) not having the ability to buy as much stuff, but still more stuff than the great majority of her countrymen?
 

WHICHUBERUBE

New Member
Generally foreign company jobs are considered prime jobs in the Philippines. People strive to get them. Not everyone has useful employment skills or speaks servicible English so the companies pay relatively well when they find them. They are considered professional jobs. They often work 9 hours with a 1 hour break (not paid). They often get full benefits and a " 13th month pay". (One month bonus).

I am absolutely clueless how Uber compensates them and they may stray from this but it would be fairly unlikely, I suspect. Not knowing and guessing, salary is probably $300 to $800 USD month. The vast majority between $300 and $600. Again, Uber may be using a different model but the above is a credible ball park.

The suggestion of slave labor is stated out of pure ignorance. Now if your talking about less desirable jobs that could be true.
 

JimS

Well-Known Member
Meanwhile the workers in Manilla are looking at us and saying, "those poor slave workers! Work for 30 cents a mile!"
 
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