Advice to UBer

Oscar Levant

Well-Known Member
1. For UberX drivers ( I used to be one ), the rate is not enough to compensate drivers for use of their cars.
When I was driving UberX, the partner report said I was making $20 per hour, but when I divided my actual hours on the road for Uber, servicing Uber requests, by the total a received minus gas, it was $10, on the average. From this I have to deduct accelerated maintenance and depreciation. The actual earnings are below minimum wage. I've talked to many X drivers, and they are saying similar. The rate should be enough to be profitable after deducting the IRS per mile deductible. I suspect the floor should be $2 per mile in most cities. When I started, it was $1.90, and I was doing fine. It descended to $1 per mile, and I got emails saying I would be making more, but hte truth is, my earnings were slashed in half. How would you like a 50% reducing in pay? how would that affect your morale?

Currently, the IRS deduction 56 cents per mile. If paid miles average about 50% of total miles driven, then every paid mile costs an average of $1.12. Yet, most rates are lower than this, this is recipe for disaster, in the long run. The IRS deduction is calculated from real world averaged costs. This is what it actually costs drivers to operate vehicles, and may be higher because of commercial usage.

2. Uber reports most drivers are happy with Uber. But, can Uber trust survey data when drivers are afraid to speak their mind for fear of being deactivated? An anonymous system is recommended.

3. I'm 64, and Uber is the first company in my entire life where I couldn't call the office, or speak to a real human for issues that come up, occasionally. I used to drive for Yellow, and though we recieved calls via a computer, there was a two way radio, I could pick up the microphone any time to talk to someone, if an issue came up requiring an immediate answer to. Installing two way radios would be very simple, really, ( all couriers have them ) but it would require Uber to have a transmitter.

4. CSR emails are always cut and pasted, and demoralizing, drivers feel they are not getting their communications answered, and often the cut and pasted reply does not answer the question asked, so, --- the drivers feel isolated.

5. Too much emphasis on ratings. Ratings are misleading, and are a source of deep resentment for every driver I have talked to about it. It 's as if drivers are just a number, and the number doesn't tell the whole story, the rating system is very stressful for drivers, and stress reduces driver morale. Rating system is demoralizing. Riders are not told that too many 4 stars will get a driver deactivated, so 4 starts are equal to a thumbs down rating, and this is a source of driver frustration.

6. Driver morale is low, very low, because of the ratings system, and fare rates are not enough to compensate drivers for use of their vehicles, and, as such, Uber drivers are subsidizing UBer. This is unethical. Poor driver morale, well, there is only one way to know if it exists, just look at UberX turnover rate. I bet its high. I've taken UberX as a rider, several times, and every one of them had only driven a few weeks, or few months, I bet turnover is high. this tells me driver morale is low, and the cost of it is high, and dangerous, because that cost will not be obvious on the balance sheet and profit and loss statements. See, driver morale cannot be hidden from customers, they can feel it, sense it, and this can't be good for business, in the long term.

7. The CEO wants to replace drivers with driverless cars. Nothing like a robot to make a driver feel he is a valued "partner", eh? CEO says driverless cars will result in savings for riders. But, is CEO factoring in the need for wharehouses of driverless cars with attending technicians in every city UBer operates? I sincerely doubt driverless cars will allow for lower rates for customers.

I currently drive for UberSUV, and the SUV is profitable, and I'm happy with Uber except for the rating system, it's very frustrating and I personally resent it, it makes me feel that all I am is a number, nothing more, it's dehumanizing. I feel if Uber wants to find out about drivers, surveys are the best way. On the other hand, my commerical insurance as been increased t0 $8,000 per year, so this is going to reduce my income by about $4o00 per year, or so, and the rate hasn't increased to compensate.

8: UBER MUST STOP advertising 'earn up to $1000 per week' in its recruitment ads. This is a lie. People know it's a lie, drivers know it's a lie. Just because a driver can earn a lot in NYC, that doesn't mean it's possible anywhere else, and it just isn't. This causes deep resentment. Now Im' seeing "drivers earn $688 per week'. That's just as bad because a specific figure implies a wage, and it's just not true. In other words, Uber MUST stop being deceitful in it's procurement ads.

9: Don't reward CSRs for quantity of emails, reward for quality. They always cut and paste, and it's easy to tell because the language is always corporate-speak, worded in ways that no one actually talks like, or writes like. There is nothing worse than to recieve a cut and pasted email, it's demoralizing. Many email replies do not answer the question, giving the driver the idea that the CSR did not read the email at all. Sure, Uber sends surveys, but the surveys tend to ask the wrong questions. in fact, most surveys I've recieved I do not answer because Im not assured of anonymity, and I, like many other drivers, feel that if I don't say UBER is GREAT, yadda yadda, Uber will deactivate me under the pretence "not a good fit ". Uber will NEVER get the truth unless general surveys are anonymous, and how can you gaurantee that? You cant. But, you could if you would allow for snail mail, but, of course, Uber is never going to do that, and that is a shame.

10. There should be monthly meetings with drivers and management/office personnel, so drivers could get to know other drivers and staff, this will help build a feeling of community. I know UBer does this, on occasion, but not often enough, in my opinion, and they usually do it on busy days, it should be done on a tuesday or wednesday, in the mid afternoon, when it's slow.

11: STRONG RECOMMENDATION: The USNavy has a post called "Master Chief Of The Navy". There is only one post, and the function of his post is that this sailor is the voice of all enlisted men and speaks for them, and their needs, and provides their viewpoint on issues concerning sailors to the brass from the sailor's point of view, or that's how I believe it should be (if it isn't). I strongly recommend that Uber hire one if its more experienced drivers to represent the drivers's viewpoint on policy decisions. Uber has experienced a number of PR disasters that could have been avoided if you had hired this driver for this post. ( Not saying Uber should hire me, but of course, I wouldn't turn down a nice job, with benefits --- hey, no harm in asking :smiles: ).

I found UberX to be unprofitable. I've been driving for Uber for almost 2 years. I have driven taxis, limos, shuttles, off an on for a total of about 12 - 15 years experience, since the 70s.
 
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Oh My

Well-Known Member
1. For UberX drivers ( I used to be one ), the rate is not enough to compensate drivers for use of their cars.
When I was driving UberX, the partner report said I was making $20 per hour, but when I divided my actual hours on the road for Uber, servicing Uber requests, by the total a received minus gas, it was $10, on the average. From this I have to deduct accelerated maintenance and depreciation. The actual earnings are below minimum wage. I've talked to many X drivers, and they are saying similar. The rate should be enough to be profitable after deducting the IRS per mile deductible. I suspect the floor should be $2 per mile in most cities. When I started, it was $1.90, and I was doing fine. It descended to $1 per mile, and I got emails saying I would be making more, but hte truth is, my earnings were slashed in half. How would you like a 50% reducing in pay? how would that affect your morale?

Currently, the IRS deduction 56 cents per mile. If paid miles average about 50% of total miles driven, then every paid mile costs an average of $1.12. Yet, most rates are lower than this, this is recipe for disaster, in the long run. The IRS deduction is calculated from real world averaged costs. This is what it actually costs drivers to operate vehicles, and may be higher because of commercial usage.

2. Uber reports most drivers are happy with Uber. But, can Uber trust survey data when drivers are afraid to speak their mind for fear of being deactivated? An anonymous system is recommended.

3. I'm 64, and Uber is the first company in my entire life where I couldn't call the office, or speak to a real human for issues that come up, occasionally. I used to drive for Yellow, and though we recieved calls via a computer, there was a two way radio, I could pick up the microphone any time to talk to someone, if an issue came up requiring an immediate answer to. Installing two way radios would be very simple, really, ( all couriers have them ) but it would require Uber to have a transmitter.

4. CSR emails are always cut and pasted, and demoralizing, drivers feel they are not getting their communications answered, and often the cut and pasted reply does not answer the question asked, so, --- the drivers feel isolated.

5. Too much emphasis on ratings. Ratings are misleading, and are a source of deep resentment for every driver I have talked to about it. It 's as if drivers are just a number, and the number doesn't tell the whole story, the rating system is very stressful for drivers, and stress reduces driver morale. Rating system is demoralizing. Riders are not told that too many 4 stars will get a driver deactivated, so 4 starts are equal to a thumbs down rating, and this is a source of driver frustration.

6. Driver morale is low, very low, because of the ratings system, and fare rates are not enough to compensate drivers for use of their vehicles, and, as such, Uber drivers are subsidizing UBer. This is unethical. Poor driver morale, well, there is only one way to know if it exists, just look at UberX turnover rate. I bet its high. I've taken UberX as a rider, several times, and every one of them had only driven a few weeks, or few months, I bet turnover is high. this tells me driver morale is low, and the cost of it is high, and dangerous, because that cost will not be obvious on the balance sheet and profit and loss statements. See, driver morale cannot be hidden from customers, they can feel it, sense it, and this can't be good for business, in the long term.

7. The CEO wants to replace drivers with driverless cars. Nothing like a robot to make a driver feel he is a valued "partner", eh? CEO says driverless cars will result in savings for riders. But, is CEO factoring in the need for wharehouses of driverless cars with attending technicians in every city UBer operates? I sincerely doubt driverless cars will allow for lower rates for customers.

I currently drive for UberSUV, and the SUV is profitable, and I'm happy with Uber except for the rating system, it's very frustrating and I personally resent it, it makes me feel that all I am is a number, nothing more, it's dehumanizing. I feel if Uber wants to find out about drivers, surveys are the best way. On the other hand, my commerical insurance as been increased t0 $8,000 per year, so this is going to reduce my income by about $4o00 per year, or so, and the rate hasn't increased to compensate.

I found UberX to be unprofitable. I've been driving for Uber for almost 2 years. I have driven taxis, limos, shuttles, off an on for a total of about 12 - 15 years experience, since the 70s.
I never drove a taxi, limo or shuttle before driving for Uber and I knew it was unprofitable upon their first rate cut and additional commission at the same time in Chicago - and I didn't even need to pull out a calculator.

Regarding your #2? They all have less than 90 days in driving for Uber. Guaranteed.
 

UberNorthStar

Well-Known Member
Oscar Levant said:
7. The CEO wants to replace drivers with driverless cars. Nothing like a robot to make a driver feel he is a valued "partner", eh? CEO says driverless cars will result in savings for riders. But, is CEO factoring in the need for wharehouses of driverless cars with attending technicians in every city UBer operates? I sincerely doubt driverless cars will allow for lower rates for customers.
8. When Uber makes changes in the "Partner Agreement" (ROFLMAO! Partner?), It is without consulting the partners involved. Changes are made arbitrarily; partners do not have representation when drivers' rates are dropped and Uber's commission is raised.

9. All Uber cares about is putting more drivers on the road. Their background checks are completed w/n 4 days and the applicant is on the road. If government entities required drug tests and FBI fingerprinting, many undesirables would be weeded out.
 

Winkomo

Member
8. When Uber makes changes in the "Partner Agreement" (ROFLMAO! Partner?), It is without consulting the partners involved. Changes are made arbitrarily; partners do not have representation when drivers' rates are dropped and Uber's commission is raised.

9. All Uber cares about is putting more drivers on the road. Their background checks are completed w/n 4 days and the applicant is on the road. If government entities required drug tests and FBI fingerprinting, many undesirables would be weeded out.
Re #8, I'd say the changes to the Partner Agreement are made unilaterally as opposed to arbitrary (not trying to be a semantics wiz here); I'd be shocked if Uber does anything arbitrary regarding it's contractual relationship with the drivers. Every change they make is either because they benefit Uber or decrease the chance of hurting Uber.
 

UberNorthStar

Well-Known Member
The word is arbitrarily and the definition is:
subject to individual will or judgmentwithout restriction; contingent solely upon one's discretion:

Changes to the agreement are not done with partner input. Changes are made at the discretion of Uber CEO. :wink:
 
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Winkomo

Member
The word is arbitrarily and the definition is:
subject to individual will or judgmentwithout restriction; contingent solely upon one's discretion:

Changes to the agreement are not done with partner input. Changes are made at the discretion of Uber CEO.
I stand corrected! Like ur points all the same.
 

Raider

Well-Known Member
Uber is worth 50 billion dollars. They are doing everything right. What advice can you possibly offer them that they'll listen? It has always been the game where the rich the exploits the poor and the uneducated. Without the poor there can't be the rich.

We might think that uber is stupid this and that for cutting rates blah blah. I'm sure they have analysts that knows the market and what the absolute lowest rate that the drivers will drive for. Every ride uber gets a dollar from the SRF. just imagine how many rides are taken place throughout the day. At the end of the day we are still driving for pennies while they wipe their ass with benjamins.
 
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UberNorthStar

Well-Known Member
Every ride uber gets a dollar from the SRF.
I pd $1.55 per fare on my first paycheck.

Raider, Raiser, LLC./Uber lowers fares so drivers are earning less. Then it raises its commission so it keeps a steady income. Yes, that is common sense.
 

Oh My

Well-Known Member
I pd $1.55 per fare on my first paycheck.

Raider, Raiser, LLC./Uber lowers fares so drivers are earning less. Then it raises its commission so it keeps a steady income. Yes, that is common sense.
But people are still driving. There is plenty of water around Chicago, the East coast and the West Coast for a neo-Tea Party.
 
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