Acknowledgement

re101

Member
Is it wrong for a driver to expect the courtesy of acknowledgement when you arrive at a pick up? Got a pick up request from Discover card in Deerfield. The pin said building one, but in all fairness the rider sent me a text and said they're actually building two. I arrive at building two, ask a few people standing on the curb if they were the rider and they said no. I called the rider and there was no answer. After a couple minutes I called the rider a couple more times still no answer. I text them and reconfirmed if they were really a building two or building one. I got a reply he's at building two, and I saw the person that seem to be on the phone that was only 20 yards away. I waited a couple more minutes and canceled. That's when the rider who was in that group that was only 20 yards away came over and complain that I need to wait. He stated "I'm talking to my boss and not going to interrupt him for you " I told him he was rude and that I canceled the trip and that was that. I most certainly would've been patient if he just responded and let me know that he was close by and that by chance I was not in the wrong location. My thought is that don't order a ride until your ready to go and be ready and available for the driver. Is this the wrong thought process?
 

Tom Harding

Well-Known Member
Is it wrong for a driver to expect the courtesy of acknowledgement when you arrive at a pick up? Got a pick up request from Discover card in Deerfield. The pin said building one, but in all fairness the rider sent me a text and said they're actually building two. I arrive at building two, ask a few people standing on the curb if they were the rider and they said no. I called the rider and there was no answer. After a couple minutes I called the rider a couple more times still no answer. I text them and reconfirmed if they were really a building two or building one. I got a reply he's at building two, and I saw the person that seem to be on the phone that was only 20 yards away. I waited a couple more minutes and canceled. That's when the rider who was in that group that was only 20 yards away came over and complain that I need to wait. He stated "I'm talking to my boss and not going to interrupt him for you " I told him he was rude and that I canceled the trip and that was that. I most certainly would've been patient if he just responded and let me know that he was close by and that by chance I was not in the wrong location. My thought is that don't order a ride until your ready to go and be ready and available for the driver. Is this the wrong thought process?
You were VERY right in cancelling the call. Riders expect the drivers to respect them, but not so much the other way around. I cancelled on a call when the pickup was at The Cheese Cake Factory in the north loop area. The riders were supposed to be in front. I called and then waited, no rider, I called again, and finally cancelled. as I pulled away to the corner at Michigan Ave. a girl came up to the window and asked why I cancelled the ride. I said "you are not where the pickup point was supposed to be and you didn't answer your phone", and then I drove away.
 

qiaoxiaopang

Well-Known Member
Is it wrong for a driver to expect the courtesy of acknowledgement when you arrive at a pick up? Got a pick up request from Discover card in Deerfield. The pin said building one, but in all fairness the rider sent me a text and said they're actually building two. I arrive at building two, ask a few people standing on the curb if they were the rider and they said no. I called the rider and there was no answer. After a couple minutes I called the rider a couple more times still no answer. I text them and reconfirmed if they were really a building two or building one. I got a reply he's at building two, and I saw the person that seem to be on the phone that was only 20 yards away. I waited a couple more minutes and canceled. That's when the rider who was in that group that was only 20 yards away came over and complain that I need to wait. He stated "I'm talking to my boss and not going to interrupt him for you " I told him he was rude and that I canceled the trip and that was that. I most certainly would've been patient if he just responded and let me know that he was close by and that by chance I was not in the wrong location. My thought is that don't order a ride until your ready to go and be ready and available for the driver. Is this the wrong thought process?
In this business, the douch.e bag only gets worse by the day. Good move on cancelling on his ass. The fact that he was talking to his boss is a poor excuse. That's why we have cell phones so we can keep in contact should we need to go separate ways. I'm glad you cancelled on him. :wink:
 

Jinxstone

Well-Known Member
You did the right thing. I could understand waiting a little longer if the pax acknowledged you and indicated please wait. But this clown apparently knew you were there and decided you didn't matter. Collect your cancel fee and move on.
 

NHDriver

Well-Known Member
I have had people say they are on an important call getting into my car, notice the dash cam recording stickers, ask me if they are being recorded. I say yes you are. They tell the person on the other end of the phone they will call them back. Guess it really wasn't that important!!
 

chuber1

Well-Known Member
Uber teach them not to respect drivers
I tell ya you teach him a lesson,
I wish all driver's are like you.
 

bpm45

Well-Known Member
First rule for Uber riders is BE ON TIME.

Second rule for Uber riders is CHECK THE PICKUP LOCATION YOU SPECIFIED AND BE THERE.

Third rule for Uber riders is TIP AT LEAST $1 FOR EVERY RIDE.
 

Mapnik

Well-Known Member
Is it wrong for a driver to expect the courtesy of acknowledgement when you arrive at a pick up? Got a pick up request from Discover card in Deerfield. The pin said building one, but in all fairness the rider sent me a text and said they're actually building two. I arrive at building two, ask a few people standing on the curb if they were the rider and they said no. I called the rider and there was no answer. After a couple minutes I called the rider a couple more times still no answer. I text them and reconfirmed if they were really a building two or building one. I got a reply he's at building two, and I saw the person that seem to be on the phone that was only 20 yards away. I waited a couple more minutes and canceled. That's when the rider who was in that group that was only 20 yards away came over and complain that I need to wait. He stated "I'm talking to my boss and not going to interrupt him for you " I told him he was rude and that I canceled the trip and that was that. I most certainly would've been patient if he just responded and let me know that he was close by and that by chance I was not in the wrong location. My thought is that don't order a ride until your ready to go and be ready and available for the driver. Is this the wrong thought process?
You were absolutely 100% in the right, and you handled it exactly in the correct way - I would do the same thing, for the same reasons...

There does seem to be some confusion in the general public about who is doing who a favor with this cut-rate illegal taxi business. When I pull up to a valet zone and the pax is not there, I sometimes get staff that seem to want to chase me away... I tell them, no I don't know the last name, don't care, and trust me, I'm not waiting for them more than a few minutes... (by the way, 'charging for wait time' is not a big incentive to hang around - you make 45 cents on that - fug it, cancel.) It's as if the driver is 'lucky to get the business'... please, you want to inconvenience your guest, by all means, I have no problem to cancel and they can wait another 6 minutes for the next guy... no skin off my crotch, not for a trip I'm going to net 3 dollars on.

Also, I think it serves a valid educational purpose to cancel after 2 minutes if they don't show - let them wait another 3 minutes, or 12 minutes, or however long it's going to take the next guy up...
 

UberBeemer

Well-Known Member
Is it wrong for a driver to expect the courtesy of acknowledgement when you arrive at a pick up?... My thought is that don't order a ride until your ready to go and be ready and available for the driver. Is this the wrong thought process?

I would agree. Had a rider call me to a new subdivision the other night, no numbers on the houses yet, (?) and very poor street lighting. Followed GPS and found the pin but he wasn't there. Waited several minutes and left. Before I got back to the main street, pinged again. I go back, and he calls, tells me he can see me, and he will be right out soon as he gets his backpack. 3 minutes, no sign. No porch light. Nothing. Bye Bye. $8 without him ever in the car seemed unfair, but I got over it.
 

Pchi

Well-Known Member
Is it wrong for a driver to expect the courtesy of acknowledgement when you arrive at a pick up? Got a pick up request from Discover card in Deerfield. The pin said building one, but in all fairness the rider sent me a text and said they're actually building two. I arrive at building two, ask a few people standing on the curb if they were the rider and they said no. I called the rider and there was no answer. After a couple minutes I called the rider a couple more times still no answer. I text them and reconfirmed if they were really a building two or building one. I got a reply he's at building two, and I saw the person that seem to be on the phone that was only 20 yards away. I waited a couple more minutes and canceled. That's when the rider who was in that group that was only 20 yards away came over and complain that I need to wait. He stated "I'm talking to my boss and not going to interrupt him for you " I told him he was rude and that I canceled the trip and that was that. I most certainly would've been patient if he just responded and let me know that he was close by and that by chance I was not in the wrong location. My thought is that don't order a ride until your ready to go and be ready and available for the driver. Is this the wrong thought process?
You should of knocked him out, inject him with some h, them sold him for a carton of rolls...
 

DancingBear

Active Member
My thought is that don't order a ride until your ready to go and be ready and available for the driver. Is this the wrong thought process?

That's the one I use. Any congested or ambiguous pickup location, they better be tracking me and waving me down.

It's a bleeding shame that Uber doesn't train their rider users in these basic things.
 

Mad Medic

Well-Known Member
Many,I dont even call or text them. If Im there and I know I am there exactly where I need to be and you don't even have your porch light on or front door open, I'm just cancelling and driving off. Same if it's a known establishment with only 1 entrance/ exit. If my car is at that front door and you're still inside the club, Im gone and collecting my $3.75. If I'm in a line of taxis and other ride share cars or having to be a little away, I'll give a courtesy call so we could locate one another, not so you can spend 10 more minutes saying farewell to all your friends. Get in. I don't make enough money waiting to afford to keep the car running. Wait time money is worse than our already low driving rates
 

Friendly Jack

Well-Known Member
Is it wrong for a driver to expect the courtesy of acknowledgement when you arrive at a pick up? Got a pick up request from Discover card in Deerfield. The pin said building one, but in all fairness the rider sent me a text and said they're actually building two. I arrive at building two, ask a few people standing on the curb if they were the rider and they said no. I called the rider and there was no answer. After a couple minutes I called the rider a couple more times still no answer. I text them and reconfirmed if they were really a building two or building one. I got a reply he's at building two, and I saw the person that seem to be on the phone that was only 20 yards away. I waited a couple more minutes and canceled. That's when the rider who was in that group that was only 20 yards away came over and complain that I need to wait. He stated "I'm talking to my boss and not going to interrupt him for you " I told him he was rude and that I canceled the trip and that was that. I most certainly would've been patient if he just responded and let me know that he was close by and that by chance I was not in the wrong location. My thought is that don't order a ride until your ready to go and be ready and available for the driver. Is this the wrong thought process?
You definitely did everything right except one thing... I never cancel directly at the pickup location, but always roll a hundred yards or more away from any people in close proximity before cancelling. Why let the rider confront you?
 

leroy jenkins

Well-Known Member
To open a can of worms-----the experiences above are why some people want to flood the market with immigrant labor. They want the work force to be filled with legal slaves who have no choice but bite their tongue, be treated like garbage and paid like monkeys---even if they were a physics teacher in their home country.

Most self-respecting native Americans would never tolerate being treated like a serf from a rider. And if it was up to Uber HQ, they'd probably want a 100% H1-B driver pool cuz then they'd never see a single cancellation no matter how batsh----t crazy the situation is
 

UberBeemer

Well-Known Member
That's the one I use. Any congested or ambiguous pickup location, they better be tracking me and waving me down.

It's a bleeding shame that Uber doesn't train their rider users in these basic things.
So, there's an exception in my eyes. If a rider calls or texts and says they are almost ready and would I mind waiting, I'll tell them yes, but if another 5 goes by, then I cancel. Or, I've had customers who ordered a scheduled pickup from the train, but the train is delayed by a few minutes. If they call or text, I'm probably going to accomodate, unless they say it's 30 minutes or something.

To open a can of worms-----the experiences above are why some people want to flood the market with immigrant labor. They want the work force to be filled with legal slaves who have no choice but bite their tongue, be treated like garbage and paid like monkeys---even if they were a physics teacher in their home country.

Most self-respecting native Americans would never tolerate being treated like a serf from a rider. And if it was up to Uber HQ, they'd probably want a 100% H1-B driver pool cuz then they'd never see a single cancellation no matter how batsh----t crazy the situation is
Do you think Uber cares what race color or creed you are as long as your car meets their requirements and you pass a background check? Could you be displacing some frustrations?
 
Top