Acceptance %

Attractspsychos

New Member
If I was to ignore a few pings, my acceptance percentage goes down. I am at 100% now. Does this matter at all or is there a limit and you cannot go under a certain %
 

MikesUber

Well-Known Member
If I was to ignore a few pings, my acceptance percentage goes down. I am at 100% now. Does this matter at all or is there a limit and you cannot go under a certain %
Acceptance Rates
High acceptance rates are a critical part of reliable, high-quality service, but not accepting trip requests does not lead to permanent loss of your account.

Consistently accepting trip requests helps maximize earnings for drivers and keeps the system running smoothly. We know that sometimes things come up that prevent you from accepting every trip request, or you may want to take a break. But not accepting dispatches causes delays and degrades the reliability of the system. If you don’t want to accept trips, just log off.

If you consistently decline trip requests, we will assume you do not want to accept more trips and you may be logged out of the app.

More: https://www.uber.com/legal/community-guidelines/us-en/
 

MikesUber

Well-Known Member
Acceptance Rates
High acceptance rates are a critical part of reliable, high-quality service, but not accepting trip requests does not lead to permanent loss of your account.

Consistently accepting trip requests helps maximize earnings for drivers and keeps the system running smoothly. We know that sometimes things come up that prevent you from accepting every trip request, or you may want to take a break. But not accepting dispatches causes delays and degrades the reliability of the system. If you don’t want to accept trips, just log off.

If you consistently decline trip requests, we will assume you do not want to accept more trips and you may be logged out of the app.

More: https://www.uber.com/legal/community-guidelines/us-en/
Short answer you cannot be permanently deactivated for ignoring pings. After 3-5 consecutive missed pings you will be placed in a 5-10 minute time out window however.
 

MikesUber

Well-Known Member
Well said. I do not have that issue. I accept all. Just curious though. Thank you.
You don't have to accept everything once you're in the city, look at passenger rating, surge levels and distance/time to the passenger, profitability wise it may be a better business move to not take certain requests. I typically don't take anything greater than ~6 minutes away. I understand you're coming from further away though. Remember to remain online on your way to the city as that 40 min drive is tax deductible.
 

MikesUber

Well-Known Member
Seriously it is tax deductible? So you recommend nothing really past 6 minutes?
The miles are, whenever you drive keep a manual log (notebook or on your phone) recording the starting odometer reading. When you finish for the day record the ending odometer reading. This mileage is tax deductible at 53.5 cents a mile.*

And as far as pick up distance that's up to you, you're not getting paid for miles driven to the passenger so those are the miles you want to minimize. Doesn't make sense to drive 10 minutes to a passenger who may only travel 5 minutes down the road. You never know where they'll head though but again the ratio of dead (empty) miles vs paid miles should be optimized.

More*: https://www.irs.gov/tax-professionals/standard-mileage-rates/
 

MikesUber

Well-Known Member
Mike, seriously you are awesome. I have no clue on what I can and cannot write off. I guess I never thought about it
Any purchases related to ridesharing can be written off as well (in part or in full): dash camera, floor mats, phone mounts, sick bags. Car maintenance and servicing. Car washes. Insurance, registration...

BIG caveat however...

You can either use the standard mileage deduction (i.e. total business miles x 53.5 cents) OR use an itemized deduction where you add up all expenses for the year divided by miles. You cannot use both under my understanding of the law.

I am not a CPA and this is not tax or legal advice. I would consult with a CPA or tax professional if you have specific tax questions related to this.


Glad to help, best of luck out there.




Tip: Stay parked when online, minimize your dead miles when waiting for a fare request.
 

Xeverrer

Active Member
Just to add into this... for me personally (and in my opinion, how you should think about this) where I am changes a lot of what I'm willing to accept

If I'm downtown I'm not taking something 5 miles & 12 minutes away. Under 6 sounds reasonable there. If you're out in Canonsburg, you probably want to roll the dice if it says 10 minutes because they may be going into city or airport or whatever (Destination filters help w/ this too obviously)

Time and surge plays a factor as well. You might be willing to drive a bit at 11 AM just to get a ride as opposed to 2 AM when you're in surge.

I try to stay parked and Mike's absolutely right about trying to kill dead miles, but I'll make exceptions for that as well at various times of day (think: rides towards south side when everyone is going to bar but no one leaving yet or whatever)
 

MasterKNinja

Well-Known Member
If I'm downtown I'm not taking something 5 miles & 12 minutes away. Under 6 sounds reasonable there. If you're out in Canonsburg, you probably want to roll the dice if it says 10 minutes because they may be going into city or airport or whatever (Destination filters help w/ this too obviously)

Yeah outside the city everything is further away, rides are longer on average, $7-$11 are typical fares, so it can pay to drive 10 minutes. People outside the city also tip more often. They're newer to Uber & are used to cabs & weren't around for the BS "tips are included" era.

I try to stay parked and Mike's absolutely right about trying to kill dead miles, but I'll make exceptions for that as well at various times of day (think: rides towards south side when everyone is going to bar but no one leaving yet or whatever)
Uber published a white paper a while back using big data analysis to compare staying still vs continual driving & found continual driving made more money. It's counter-intuitive, 'cause you're using more gas & racking up more mileage, but if you keep looping back to known 'hot spots' you end up making slightly more per hour. On a busy night it doesn't matter, but it becomes more apparent at slow times. Didn't save the link though. I'm too lazy to try & Google it.
 
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bigga519

Well-Known Member
Yeah outside the city everything is further away, rides are longer on average, $7-$11 are typical fares, so it can pay to drive 10 minutes. People outside the city also tip more often. They're newer to Uber & are used to cabs & weren't around for the BS "tips are included" era.


Uber published a white paper a while back using big data analysis to compare staying still vs continual driving & found continual driving made more money. It's counter-intuitive, 'cause you're using more gas & racking up more mileage, but if you keep looping back to known 'hot spots' you end up making slightly more per hour. On a busy night it doesn't matter, but it becomes more apparent at slow times. Didn't save the link though. I'm too lazy to try & Google it.
I'm all about parking and waiting between trips. I hate driving around and chasing trips. Depending where you are the wait won't be long. Lots of times I get new trip requests as I'm finishing up a current trip, especially in Oakland, lawrenceville, south side and north shore.
 

coach81

New Member
I also used to worry about acceptance percentage but profitability is more important I still try to keep it high but driving 15 minutes for a minimum fare is not profitable because I have XL I sometimes depending on the night go a little farther than normal for a pickup
 
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