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A message from new President of Ridesharing,Jeff Jones

Discussion in 'Notifications' started by CarterPeerless, Nov 14, 2016.

  1. Retired Senior

    Retired Senior Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Connecticut....
    Driving:
    UberX
    You mean like Donald Trump and his promise (now withdrawn) about disclosing his income taxes?
     
  2. UberLaLa

    UberLaLa Well-Known Member

    Location:
    LaLa Land


    Turned this all around right into a discussion about your politics....you you you....you're good!
     
  3. Retired Senior

    Retired Senior Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Connecticut....
    Driving:
    UberX
    Be Cool, Buddy! I neither praised nor condemned the action - or non-action. But I do believe that words mean specific things, and that you can't arbitrarily change their meaning without damaging the communication that is vital to social cohesion. George Orwell introduced us to "Double Speak" in his book "1984". I think our newly elected President and his friends mastered the subject!
     
    UberLaLa likes this.
  4. Michael - Cleveland

    Michael - Cleveland Moderator Moderator

    Location:
    Great Lakes
    Driving:
    UberSELECT
    Uber never has to earn a dime in profits from the rideshare business. That's not the end-game - and hasn't been since Uber began raising serious capital. Think of the data being collected - think of the value of that data - think of the captured audience (eyeballs) - and then think 'Google' and you start to get an idea of why so much big money is behind Uber.
     
    circle1 and UberLaLa like this.
  5. UberLaLa

    UberLaLa Well-Known Member

    Location:
    LaLa Land
    There you go again...and for that you get the long cut version! lol

     
    Retired Senior likes this.

  6. Wil_Iam_Fuber'd

    Wil_Iam_Fuber'd Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Chi-Town
    Ah, so it's the data now that's worth a fortune? I thought it was robot cars. And what is the value of that data exactly?

    Do you mean the same data that every mobile phone company, retail merchant, credit card company, mortgage broker, insurance company, medical provider, and every other consumer facing industry has been collecting for 300 years? That data?
     
  7. circle1

    circle1 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Seattle
    THIS^
     
  8. freediverdude

    freediverdude Active Member

    Location:
    Tampa, FL
    Yep, think of what that data is worth to advertisers, when Uber knows you go to a certain place at a certain time every day or frequently. And knows the route you take and what businesses are on the route. Imagine being in an Uber and getting a message on your phone that a Taco Bell is 2 blocks ahead, they've got a special taco deal for Uber, tell your driver to pull in there for a moment. More money for Taco Bell, longer fare for Uber, rider is happy getting a meal on the way.
     
    circle1 likes this.
  9. circle1

    circle1 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Seattle
    Absolutely. We're at the point now that, unless you use different devices for different things (i.e., buying, shopping, email, etc.), Big Data vendors probably know your underware size, what your medical issues are, where you usually hangout on Thursday afternoons at 4pm, and your SSN!
     
  10. tohunt4me

    tohunt4me Well-Known Member

    Location:
    new orleans , la.
    He said " just as soon as Hillary reveals her 39,000 ERASED E MAILS.
     
  11. Retired Senior

    Retired Senior Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Connecticut....
    Driving:
    UberX
    About Amazon and Google and their hunger for your data....
    The American people have sold their privacy - and their souls - for some imagined convenience . Your home assistant now knows more about you than your spouse, your pet animal, and your best friend.

    UBER really is a "Johnny come lately".

    https://www.technologyreview.com/s/...ign=newsletters&utm_source=newsletter-weekly-

    Mobile
    Alexa Gives Amazon a Powerful Data Advantage
    Millions of people talking with Alexa could help Amazon fight off Google in the home voice assistant market.


    Amazon is estimated to have sold more than five million Echo devices, which have the voice-activated Alexa assistant inside.
    “Hey, Alexa”—a phrase that millions of people call out at home just before telling Amazon their desires at that moment. All those people asking Alexa to order kitchen supplies, turn on the lights, or play music gives Amazon a valuable stockpile of data that it could use to fend off competitors and make breakthroughs in what voice-operated assistants can do.


    “There are millions of these in households, and they’re not collecting dust,” Nikko Strom, a speech-recognition expert and founding member of the team at Amazon that built Alexa and Echo, said at the AI Frontiers conference in Santa Clara, California, last week. “We get an insane amount of data coming in that we can work on.”

    Strom said that data had already helped the company make progress on a longstanding challenge in speech recognition known as the cocktail party problem, where the challenge is to pick out a single voice from a hubbub of many people talking.

    Initially Alexa could easily tell that someone had called out its name, but—like other voice-recognition systems—it struggled to know which words being said around it were the request being issued. Then Strom’s team developed a system that notes characteristics of a voice that calls out “Alexa” and uses them to home in on the words of the person asking for help.

    The data Amazon is amassing to take on problems like that could be unique. Standard datasets available for training and testing speech recognition systems don’t usually include audio captured in home environments, or using microphone arrays like that the Echo uses to focus on speech from a particular direction, says Abeer Alwan, a professor at University of California, Los Angeles, who works on speech recognition.

    “People have been toying with microphone arrays for a long time but I don’t think there has been a deployment at the scale Amazon is talking about,” says Alwan. More data on a particular scenario or type of speech usually translates into better performance, she says.

    Strom said he also hopes that his team’s data trove could eventually help upgrade Alexa to being able to follow two people speaking simultaneously. “It’s hard, but there’s been some progress,” he said. “It’s super interesting for us if we could solve that problem.”

    Strom didn’t say what Alexa might be able to do once that problem is solved. But it might make it more natural for multiple people to interact with an Echo or other device at once, whether that’s kids peppering Alexa with questions or their parents rattling off a shopping list.

    The data piling up from Alexa could also help Amazon fend off Google’s Echo competitor, Google Home, which launched late last year. Google can draw on years of work in Web search and voice search, and sizeable investments in artificial intelligence. But its previous products and businesses don’t naturally collect speech like that of a person calling out to a device in the home, or on the same type of requests people ask home assistants to serve.

    Amazon is probably hoping that this contest turns out like the Web search market. Research has suggested that one reason Google’s dominance couldn’t be shaken by startups or well-funded competitors such as Microsoft was that Google had piles more data on what people search for and click on.

    Early reviews of Google Home have generally said that it and Amazon’s products are broadly similar, each with their own strong points. And Google is presumably working hard to learn all it can from the data coming in from its new product. But it will take some time for that flow of information to rival what Amazon is getting.

    Analysts estimated last November that over five million Echo devices had been sold since its launch two years prior, and Amazon said last month that Echo devices were the top seller over the holiday season. Alexa is also set to start appearing in products, such as speakers, cars, and fridges, from other companies.
     
    circle1 likes this.
  12. Ls1478

    Ls1478 New Member

    Location:
    inland empire
    when we received the email for him he included that address, my nice android phone has decided to delete it on its own and now I can't seem to get it, and if you ask UBER for it they will refuse to give it to you, saying they can resolve any issues, which we all know they can not.
    be aware if you have done instant pay even once, they will continue to deduct 50 from every earning, and good luck trying to get that back. also when surges are happening drivers must screenshot it or you will not get paid your surge fees. Uber conveniently will say there was not surge at that time.
     
    circle1 likes this.
  13. circle1

    circle1 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Seattle
    This is royally F'ed up!
     
  14. Retired Senior

    Retired Senior Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Connecticut....
    Driving:
    UberX
    This ad appeared on AOL today for the first time.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Retired Senior

    Retired Senior Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Connecticut....
    Driving:
    UberX
    I'm not worried about targeted ads. What does worry me is that this technology, coupled with a very thin-skinned President Trump, makes it very easy to apprehend a "person of interest". My Mom always told her kids to be "interesting". These days I favor being invisible.
     
  16. CarterPeerless

    CarterPeerless Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Phoenix
    Driving:
    UberXL
  17. expoolman

    expoolman Member

    Location:
    Maryland
    Except he made a truckload of our money before he quit.
     
  18. Dontmakemepullauonyou

    Dontmakemepullauonyou Well-Known Member

    Location:
    West Coast
  19. Michael - Cleveland

    Michael - Cleveland Moderator Moderator

    Location:
    Great Lakes
    Driving:
    UberSELECT
    “It is now clear, however, that the beliefs and approach to leadership that have guided my career are inconsistent with what I saw and experienced at Uber..."
    Reading that, I wish he'd stayed on to fight the fight.
    But...
    Jones' decision to leave Uber likely won't surprise people who worked with him at Target. "Jeff does not like conflict," a source previously told Recode.
    Yeah... well, when you accept a multi-million dollar compensation package from a company, maybe you should have some 'conflict resolution' skills.
     
    Disgusted Driver likes this.
  20. iilee

    iilee New Member

    Location:
    san jose
    Does anyone have the facebook page where Jeff tries to talk to drivers and gets berated?
     

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